Anyone feel BETTER after getting the Covid vax?

lenora

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Hi 2Cor.12:19.....I'm glad for the COVID patients, but hope they don't stop pulling research $$ because we're still here and in need of help.

It's a very complicated illness....it seems the longer you have, the more you understand about it. And so many small things have to be researched, papers written, presentations made before there are any real answers.

I have wondered how people with West Nile Virus have fared, and the host of others that are often lumped together? I would love to be able to look back 30 or 40 years from now and see if our world has changed. It will for the younger cohort, I have no doubt, but in the meantime there are so many aspects of life that are being challenged. I hope the answer comes soon. Yours, Lenora.
 

gbells

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.I'm glad for the COVID patients, but hope they don't stop pulling research $$ because we're still here and in need of help.
What research money? They only allocate $15mil/yr. The book Osler's web by Hillary Johnson showed how NIH was intentionally avoiding funding research on any physical manifestations of ME. I don't think they have any intention of curing it.
 

2Cor.12:19

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What research money? They only allocate $15mil/yr. The book Osler's web by Hillary Johnson showed how NIH was intentionally avoiding funding research on any physical manifestations of ME. I don't think they have any intention of curing it.
@gbells Big money (over 1 Billion $) was recently allotted to study Covid long haulers which will have implications for us. Osler's Web was written in 1996 and we've come a long way since then. True, not nearly as far as we'd like, but we've had some significant victories due to persistence patient and research advocacy.

https://www.healthrising.org/blog/2020/12/24/congress-billion-covid-19-long-haulers/
 
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gbells

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When we consider that millions upon millions of elderly people in and outside of nursing homes have atherosclerosis and have now been vaccinated worldwide without having a problem, I believe it’s safe to say we can be as confident as we could possibly be that the vaccines are very safe.
I agree with this. The body is overcome with a temporary lapse of immunity that allows combined viral infections to create large colonies of immortalized cells which then trigger mitochondral fragmentation and ME.
 

lenora

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Yes, Osler's Web (very thick book, by the way) was written a long time ago by our standards. Some areas have done a good job with raising private money for research and we have to help as much as we're able. The government has never funded unnecessarily.

I was so hopeful when research was done for AIDS, MS (which gets a lot of research money) and I was thinking some of the research will filter down to us. Wrong. Again, MS privately funded research for a long time before the government became involved. True, a lot of people with MS are able to recover in between attacks and were wonderful speakers in front of Congress and the like. That's how they came to receive large funds for research.

Somehow, and for whatever reason, we've never been able to gain that status... illness more than anything is what I suspect. Researchers are now able to help us, have been especially trained to do so, and the most we can hope for is to actually pay them for their skills. Government funds should follow, if enough interest is garnered.

Public ignorance isn't what it was. There are at least 3 good movies, not including UNREST that explain in an interesting way the path of ME. I don't know about England, so someone from there will have to answer. And let our voices be heard. Yours, Lenora.
 
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When we consider that millions upon millions of elderly people in and outside of nursing homes have atherosclerosis and have now been vaccinated worldwide without having a problem, I believe it’s safe to say we can be as confident as we could possibly be that the vaccines are very safe.

Some countries limit use of AstraZeneca vaccine
A number of countries have restricted the use of the AstraZeneca vaccine after the European Union's drug regulator pointed to a "possible link" to rare cases of blood clots.
 

JollyRoger

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I just had my 2nd Moderna shot 3 days ago. I was terrified when I got the first one because I've had severe ME for 35 years and can't take vaccines due to severe reactions to flu shots. To my surprise, I had almost no side effects with #1 shot and even felt better than usual afterwards for a few days.

#2 shot came with side effects. I felt like I had a nasty case of the flu starting at 10 hrs after the shot, and lasting for about 24 hours. Ran a temp of 101. But then I woke up this morning at 3:40 am and was fine in spite of not having much sleep. When I finally got up I felt good (for me) - so much so that I was able to do several housecleaning projects which I would normally have to pace over several days. Today I feel better than I have in quite awhile. Clearer thinking too.

I doubt this will last, but it's somewhat of a phenom that I've been reading from other ME/CFS patients. Reminds me of the old movie Awakenings. Anyone else experience this?

I hope the ME/ researchers will look into this.
I do some research regarding the vaccines and the immune system.

i found an interesting article about Moderna+BionTech and Th1/Th2 balance:

In addition to evaluating humoral response (ie, neutralizing antibody titers), cellular immunity was also evaluated. mRNA-1273 demonstrated Th1-type T cell polarization with minimal Th2 cytokine expression.
...
Cellular response was demonstrated through Th1 cytokine producing CD4+ T cell (S-specific) response (cohort 1: 76-83%; cohort 3: 60-67%) and CD8+ T cell (S-specific) response (cohort 1: 51-64%; cohort 3: 24-36%) Assessment for vaccine associated enhanced respiratory disease (VAERD) was completed by measuring CD4+ Th1 and Th2 responses to the vaccine evaluating for Th2 skewed response. Two participants had a measurable Th2 response, but Th1/Th2 ratio indicated it was a Th-1 skewed response.

So there seems to be a Th1–biased immune system reaction.
We have a imbalance toward Th2 so maybe that could be a reason why you are feeling better.
Just an idea....
 

2Cor.12:19

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I do some research regarding the vaccines and the immune system.

i found an interesting article about Moderna+BionTech and Th1/Th2 balance:

In addition to evaluating humoral response (ie, neutralizing antibody titers), cellular immunity was also evaluated. mRNA-1273 demonstrated Th1-type T cell polarization with minimal Th2 cytokine expression.
...
Cellular response was demonstrated through Th1 cytokine producing CD4+ T cell (S-specific) response (cohort 1: 76-83%; cohort 3: 60-67%) and CD8+ T cell (S-specific) response (cohort 1: 51-64%; cohort 3: 24-36%) Assessment for vaccine associated enhanced respiratory disease (VAERD) was completed by measuring CD4+ Th1 and Th2 responses to the vaccine evaluating for Th2 skewed response. Two participants had a measurable Th2 response, but Th1/Th2 ratio indicated it was a Th-1 skewed response.

So there seems to be a Th1–biased immune system reaction.
We have a imbalance toward Th2 so maybe that could be a reason why you are feeling better.
Just an idea....
@JollyRoger - thanks- that’s interesting. It’s been 10 days now since my 2nd dose and I’m still feeling better than I have in several years. I’ve had more energy, stamina, and overall better sense of well being despite getting little sleep (due to insomnia). I hope it continues. The fact that the vaccine is helping a good percentage (I read 30%) covid long haulers is fascinating. Hopefully it will have implications for some ME/CFS patients as well.
 

bread.

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@JollyRoger - thanks- that’s interesting. It’s been 10 days now since my 2nd dose and I’m still feeling better than I have in several years. I’ve had more energy, stamina, and overall better sense of well being despite getting little sleep (due to insomnia). I hope it continues. The fact that the vaccine is helping a good percentage (I read 30%) covid long haulers is fascinating. Hopefully it will have implications for some ME/CFS patients as well.
Do you by any chance know if you had/have low cd8 count?
 
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Second star to the right ...
He had a a massive stroke following a covid vaccination which killed him at home.
Oh, bells, I'm so sorry .... the anger and sadness over a random act of God-damn like that can be spirit- and heart-crushing
Had he lived in the EU where it was banned he might still be alive.
Try not to dwell on that. I had an old friend who used to say, in his lovely thick southern drawl , "Yaasssss, an' if bumble bees had juke-boxes on they backs, there'd be music in the air ...".


No one could have known. No one can change it.

I'm so very sorry :(:( :hug::hug::hug: ....
 
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I am fine with vaccinating people 60 and older but with a 1% death risk with proper nutrition I don't see the cost to benefit justification for those under 60.
The lastest study that found about 35% of the mild-moderate COVID victims have long haul symptoms...seems to be finally getting more widespead exposure.

Its not necessarily death one must fear. This was on Good Morning America- this week.
 
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2Cor.12:19

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The lastest study that found about 35% of the mild-moderate COVID victims seems to be finally getting more widespead exposure.

Its not necessarily death one must fear. This was on Good Morning America- this week.
Yeah, we have a 19 year old friend with long Covid who lost her job and is a mess. Same goes for my niece and nephew- both young parents in their 30-40’s. My nephew was a healthy law enforcement officer who barely survived Covid and has serous lung damage now.
I believe everyone that is able to should get vaccinated for their sake and everyone else’s.
But that’s just my opinion.
 
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The big increase in ICU patients in Canada is young people 20-40. A trip to ICU is so tough on a person that in itself can lead to long term problems. I respect people's choice not to get it, especially those with immune system dysfunction, but I have been leaning towards getting it with the third wave and the new variants on their way. There's been very few cases in the area where I live and there was a hope of riding it out but that doesn't seem to be the forecast now. Lung damage is horrifying.
 

2Cor.12:19

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The big increase in ICU patients in Canada is young people 20-40. A trip to ICU is so tough on a person that in itself can lead to long term problems. I respect people's choice not to get it, especially those with immune system dysfunction, but I have been leaning towards getting it with the third wave and the new variants on their way. There's been very few cases in the area where I live and there was a hope of riding it out but that doesn't seem to be the forecast now. Lung damage is horrifying.
I had some imaging done at our local hospital this week and asked the technician about their COVID cases. He told me that there had been 200 intubated and only 2 of them survived.
He also said that their respiratory therapists are seeing young people with lungs that look like they’ve been heavy smokers for 50 years.
I was initially very worried about getting the vaccine because of all my neurological problems- but boy, am I thankful I did!!!
 

gbells

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I don't see the advantage of immunization for those under 60 who aren't high exposure. If people would just wear masks, distance we can get the disease down to a level where we can contact trace and quarantine. The vaccines aren't effective against all the variants and only last 3-8 months. I'm not willing to risk the blood clotting effect and am not worried about the infection given that I've already had it (I'm 50) and had a moderate case following low inflammation/low glyphosate nutrition guidelines. My mother is a 67 year old obese diabetic, she did the same thing and was the healthiest person in the ICU. For people over 60 I think vaccination makes sense but not below without high exposure.
 
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I had some imaging done at our local hospital this week and asked the technician about their COVID cases. He told me that there had been 200 intubated and only 2 of them survived.
Same in the UK. Intubated patients are unlikely to survive, But it's worth pointing out that most of them are elderly with other, often serious, health problems and intubation is in its self a fairly brutal procedure.
 

lenora

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@2Cor.12:19.....Interesting article, but two things stick in my mind. First off, it states that a minority of Long Haulers are recovering. That can't be under/overestimated.

Also, I wonder if it depends upon how long you're had the virus. For someone like me, it's a minimum of 35 yrs. (since I actively became ill...or so ill that my routine existence ceased to be). Since then, I'm had large nos. of viral injections and well, nothing happened. How I wish I could state otherwise.

So would these people have recovered on their own? And does having the illness for a long period of time reduce your chances of recovery. Not to destroy hope in people, but also to tell those who haven't had any change that there are others out here just like them.

Perhaps the answer lies with the increased use of antivirals, which brings another question up: Were these people all treated the same way...the exact same treatments? Research often involves more questions than answers. Perhaps the needed booster shots for COVID will work for some of us. Let's hope. Yours, Lenora.