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“Lying in Biz”

Disclaimer: I’m embarrassed to even post this. It could have been written by a teenager. But what better place to showcase a piece of teenage-quality writing than on PR.

Honesty is the best policy. That’s what we’re all taught as children, right? But what if we turned that on its backside and brought to light a theme that is all-too paramount in the world of business: lying as an effective best policy. What’s the significance, you ask? Despite being risky and unethical, the practice of lying is an unspoken rule and formidable tactic used to ward off potential danger or threats in the workforce. Sounds like a really bad idea, doesn’t it? Perhaps, but it matters not, because lying in business is a common practice that is sure to continue so as long as people remain human.

We have all been the victims of lies, and we’ve all told one. Having said that, I purport that the three types of people in this world – liars, white liars, and the brutally honest (well, most of the time) – don’t fully understand the role that money (yep, that root of all evil) has on their psyche. In fact, the lines are blurred, the playing field isn’t level, and everyone is having an identity crisis. You’re only fibbing when it’s about who ate the last piece of cheesecake in the fridge, but when it’s your butt on the line at work and you’re at risk of losing Free Lunch Fridays or that five percent raise for good performance, you won’t hesitate to act like Charles Ponzi or Frank Abagnale if it means preserving what’s rightfully yours.

Everyone lies in business, everyone lies about money. Period. It’s not only the great citizens of America either. I’ve had my fair share of experiences with people from different cultures doing the dirty little deed of lying. As a matter of fact, having lived in Europe for some years has awakened me to the idea that it’s not only Americans who lie on the job, but Europeans, too. Yessiree. They’ll do it if they have to. Why? Because, as the saying goes, “It’s not personal, it’s just business.”

There is probably some sort of inherent justification and rationale for lying to achieve a desired result. And I don’t mean the over-the-top, ruthless lies that some of those business rogues adopt for purposes of greed. These individuals make all of us look bad as a human race. I’m referring to the simple inability to say the direct truth in circumstances related to business. And it doesn’t matter what industry we’re talking about either. Someone will always be the victim of a lie. And sometimes you – yes, you – are the perpetrator. But truth be told: we all lie at some point on the job. And it’s personal. No matter what guise we use, lying to another person is downright raunchy and disrespectful. It’s a very personal thing to do to somebody.

I’ve held many different jobs: house painter, postal worker, engineering firm gofer, ESL teacher, proofreader, investigator, staff supervisor, nurse case management assistant, dishwasher, landscaper, retail cashier, janitor, van driver, security guard, medical editorial assistant, and freelancer. Much of the disillusionment I’ve experienced over my work has come mostly from the idea that everyone was lying to me. All the time. And I really didn’t appreciate it. I’d get lied to via email, over the phone, by fax, in person, at a meeting, at a luncheon, at an after-work cocktail party, you name it. Think about how many times we’ve declared ignorance or politely misinformed someone about something to avoid a contretemps, a backlashing, or, God forbid, a little bit of hurt feelings …

Well, sir, we really don’t want to extend to you the job offer because, as your resume indicates, you once held a position as an insurance salesman. Our impression of that occupation is not the most complimentary. It doesn’t matter what kind of person you are, or if you’re the most talented professional this side of the Mississippi. We just can’t get around the fact that you did that for a living. It doesn’t shine positively on your character. Therefore, we’ll simply tell you that your qualifications are not a match. However, we will gladly keep your application on file for future reference.” The thing is, though, you were a perfect fit, but instead you got the last line as a parting gift.

So the fact is, lying is here to stay. It’s not going to go away for twelve sessions of behavioral therapy and come out as something else. Therefore, I advise you to think carefully about the real reason you didn’t get that promotion, or new job, or that Christmas bonus. Chances are, someone is trying to save face, and you’re likely being fed a big fat lie as a result, although I urge you to keep in mind that it’s all in the name of business. But you already knew that, didn’t you, dear liar?

Comments

You held all those jobs as a teenager?

Of the list of jobs you've done, I once held the position Retail clerk. It seems I was simply cut out to check out groceries using the very impressive cash register with 40 secret buttons. Everybody else, the other clerks just stared at the 40 buttons.

If there had been retail Olympics, I:d have won.

I married a business man. Shall I just say that profound Optimism is required, in the personality type- Business Man. This may be where some of this possible lying, emerges from.

A ship is always just offshore, pulling into the harbor. Its full of gold coins. Just for you. It just hasn't QUITE landed yet.
 
I did not do much teenage writing.

However, college happened and they expected us to actually write things, in this class called English 1B. Taught by a grad student.

Bugging me to this day, is the story I wrote about being shot at. How many people can say they were actually shot at? I could be dead, really dead.

Why did I get a B minus on this thrilling short story? I'll never know. Because it was typed. And there were no computers. And keeping track of random paper is randomly hard. I'm missing everything I wrote, in college.

So kudos you managed to keep your story, somehow, someway.

P.S: oh, the other time I was almost shot at. Having crawled under seven strands of barbed wire, with my seven year old daughter, to find our missing dog, who had been captured by this neighbor who was, well aiming a shot gun right at me.

Guess what? I didn't budge.

I'm a person who, faced with a shot gun, did not budge.
 
I did not do much teenage writing.

However, college happened and they expected us to actually write things, in this class called English 1B. Taught by a grad student.

Bugging me to this day, is the story I wrote about being shot at. How many people can say they were actually shot at? I could be dead, really dead.

Why did I get a B minus on this thrilling short story? I'll never know. Because it was typed. And there were no computers. And keeping track of random paper is randomly hard. I'm missing everything I wrote, in college.

So kudos you managed to keep your story, somehow, someway.

P.S: oh, the other time I was almost shot at. Having crawled under seven strands of barbed wire, with my seven year old daughter, to find our missing dog, who had been captured by this neighbor who was, well aiming a shot gun right at me.

Guess what? I didn't budge.

I'm a person who, faced with a shot gun, did not budge.
Your story deserved an A (I wrote this blog post as an adult)! Also, you are delightfully brave. Anyone who doesn’t budge from a loaded shotgun gets a gold star in my book!
 
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Honesty is truly the best policy, and I'm a firm believer in it in every circumstance. I understand your frustration doing business and being lied to. My boyfriend (ex) and I did a lot of business in the south, and we were constantly lied to by EVERYONE. There was no one we could trust, ever. The thing every one said is, "My word is my bond." Well, that was always a clue. It was such an eye-opener. Since that experience, it's been hard for me to trust what people are saying.

I thought you did a great job of writing, but who am I to judge? I'm not a writer.🙂🙃
 
Honesty is truly the best policy, and I'm a firm believer in it in every circumstance. I understand your frustration doing business and being lied to. My boyfriend (ex) and I did a lot of business in the south, and we were constantly lied to by EVERYONE. There was no one we could trust, ever. The thing every one said is, "My word is my bond." Well, that was always a clue. It was such an eye-opener. Since that experience, it's been hard for me to trust what people are saying.

I thought you did a great job of writing, but who am I to judge? I'm not a writer.🙂🙃
Thank you, Christian! Yes, the mendacity is ubiquitous. But I am also a firm believer in honesty myself.
 
My boyfriend (ex) and I did a lot of business in the south, and we were constantly lied to by EVERYONE. There was no one we could trust, ever. The thing every one said is, "My word is my bond." Well, that was always a clue

I was around alot of that. It probably didn't matter what direction you were headed.

Been watching the show on Netflix, about Anna, who decided she'd put together a business deal, and why not use other people's money? And who are you, anyway?

Alot of very famous business gone Bad, happens near here. You read about it. You wonder about karma. Sometimes it seems rather instantaneous.....
 
Doesn't it truly depend on the circumstances? E.g. My crippled mother who didn't have access (personal computers didn't exist) looked everywhere for a dress, found what she thought was ideal and bought it. After a great deal of trouble in putting it on, modeled it for me and asked what I thought. Well, it was far from ideal and we both knew it, but she was making a huge effort to attend a grandchild's wedding and I felt the need (yes need) to tell her it was lovely.

Really, the circumstances matter. I'm now older and know that my daughters probably do the same thing to me. As for me, I don't really care if something is perfect or not.....my husband doesn't care, comfort is first and foremost.

Lately, I've fallen by another degree....is this what happens to a lot of us? I was very careful about make-up, clothing and hair at one time...but also understand that I'm only capable of so much at one point. As long as I'm clean, have a clean nightgown and sheets, I'm happy and good. So no, I don't feel bad about telling my mother that she looked fine because under the circumstances she did more than I can now....and for her age and situation she did look fine. With a bit of make-up (which I could never get her to wear) and her hair done, she would have been lovely. She died over 20+ years ago (they do pass) and no, I don't regret that lie at all. Besides, aren't some just riding the line between not really wanting to hurt someone's feelings? That's more important to me. Yours, L.
 
Sadly there is big money for big business through tactical lying. Marketing and many other professions have trainings for lying and strategic manipulation, but of course they call it by other names. Just look at politics, which I won't get into...
Yes the action of lying has many levels and reasons. Many people (not oriented towards business) have lied for the protection of self or those they care about. Some who may have been dealt raw hands early on in life may have developed a lying mechanism, without solid conscious awareness, for self preservation. Other people simply lie to get what they want. Some are addicted to it.
I think when we look at human nature in a social setting, lying is part of it... all law enforcement understands this. In many cases it isn't about spotting a lie, but trying to understand the reason behind it. The biggest question is the why. Since lying is part of human nature (in some people very small, and others a great deal), there is always a reason behind it.
But the learned, perfected tactical lying in business and politics is nauseating.

Funny, or not so much, if you think of how many lies we are told as kids. It would be difficult for us all, I’m sure, to accurately count all the little lies we were told by parents… that we later found out the truth of. People have been doing this for generations and generations. Some of it is acts to entertain kids, other lies are to make kids behave. Some parent lies are simply to get kids to do what they want them to do. People are trained to tell little white lies from some of their earliest experiences at home. By the way, did anyone see the documentary called “Little White Lie”?? Crazy show.

I think for most people, not in business, lying is done out of some form of fear; whether real or conditioned from one’s past. Just look at most forums. Most of the people on a forum use a fake name and have no photo, but post in great detail like its normal to chat namelessly and faceless. This is usually a fear mechanism, anonymity; a form of hiding due to the mistrust of people.
 
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Like I said, there are lies and lies. How many of us think of the term ageism when someone hits 50 or 55? But it's real....and yet there is no real proof of it. Does it happen to one sex more than the other?

I known that pensions bring out the worst of it. Anyone nearing pension age must feel very vulnerable (unless working for something like the govt.). It's amazing what companies can get away with. Yours, Lenora.
 
Did you get your dog back safe and sound??

yes, actually, thanks for asking. She was generally trouble. Randy Weather. My husband named her that.

One of the themes in my life has been: how many times do I have to save everybody else? I'd blog on that topic, for sure. It seems I'm somebody you want around, should you need saving. I don' t look the part.

so I had to save the dog, right? I hear her, hollering. Where is my dog? behind the seven strands. Various swear words, insert here.

And where is my husband? not home, of course, he is down in town. (this is not In Town). Add more swear words.

This guy had posted No Trespassing signs every two feet on every other strand.

I got my seven year old- come on. We crawled under the seven wires. I was a professional at climbing barbed wire, had a career in that already. (and being short, I tend to go UNDER not OVER)

NORDWOLF , I think you understand what I mean by under not over.

(edited aside: we need to collaborate on a blog focused on How To Cross Large Menacing Fencing in Rural Areas).

Emerging from the ground, I stood up, and this man stepped out of a incense cedar tree, with the shot gun aimed at me and my daughter.

He could not get over that I just went right thru his fence. He probably could not get over that the Trespassers are: a darling blonde and her Mother, not so darling.

"Where is my dog"? More or less we have this conversation, he has tied her up, she is a criminal, Dog Trespasser.

I can't seem to recall how it was we simply crawled back under the fence, and I went to the phone and called husband. I don' t yet have the dog back, but at least I know thats her over there somewhere.

For the next several hours, this man pretended he was the Game Warden calling to arrest my dog and take her to Sacramento. (the big city where Game warden's take rural dogs for Dog Crimes).

My husband came home at dusk, its been about six hours now. He took another call, no, he isn't Mr. Weather.

and promised The Game Warden the dog would not go wandering over to his place, ever again. If he would just return her.

My dog showed up at the door. Shaking and trembling. She had no issues what so ever, crossing the seven wires. No that dog could levitate. She could clear a good seven feet vertical. Like a kangaroo.

She would have given kangaroos a run of their money.

In another chapter, I'll tell the tale of- Randy has six puppies. By the Wolf Dog.
Randy kept missing her Get Fixed appointments. Like she had planned it.
 
Humm... I could raise my hand for this question more times than I can count actually... ;) .... ha, ha, but I know what you're saying.

females not in the military, are not supposed to experience Being Shot At. Just pointing out this obvious thing.

Realize, I was a child, who was scared of some boy who knocked me over on my bicycle once. I remember being so scared to go to school. My big brother had to escort me for many weeks.

But I am also a firm believer in honesty myself.

my apologies: I thought I was over on NORDWOLFS blog, and offered up a longer winded second part of the Barbed Wire Story, since he asked.

Regarding the lies- its all about somehow figuring out its perfectly Ok to tell your friend her hair looks great, when it doesn't. Being honest in life, otherwise, is just a super good default position.

I do step it in, myself, having issues with being too direct. My mom told me....I"m a problem. Thanks, Mom.
 
females not in the military, are not supposed to experience Being Shot At. Just pointing out this obvious thing.

Realize, I was a child, who was scared of some boy who knocked me over on my bicycle once. I remember being so scared to go to school. My big brother had to escort me for many weeks.



my apologies: I thought I was over on NORDWOLFS blog, and offered up a longer winded second part of the Barbed Wire Story, since he asked.

Regarding the lies- its all about somehow figuring out its perfectly Ok to tell your friend her hair looks great, when it doesn't. Being honest in life, otherwise, is just a super good default position.

I do step it in, myself, having issues with being too direct. My mom told me....I"m a problem. Thanks, Mom.
:):):)
 
We often say you have to worry about the used car salesman. Lying-wise.

I frequently compared a recent world leader, using those terms. Probably that wasn't really fair, to the used car salesmen.

In the next town, where the Bad Business is often showcased, well the guy who sold the used Lamberginis- oh yeah, he didn't really have the title, but was happy to take your substantial down payment. He sold one Lambergini six times.

My husband was a pretty honest use car salesman type. We always had a fleet, and he'd arrange fixes and improvements, prior to resale. Buy low, sell high.

We sold an Airstream 3 times. Meaning, we had to keep re-possesing it. I recall retrieval, of the darn thing, parked way up in the Sierra boonies.

Its actually quite fun to have cool cars to drive, temporarily. Marry the used car salesman.....
 
yes, actually, thanks for asking.
Nice to hear :)
NORDWOLF , I think you understand what I mean by under not over.

(edited aside: we need to collaborate on a blog focused on How To Cross Large Menacing Fencing in Rural Areas).
Ha, yes I do understand what you mean ;)
Crossing fences... yes it can be a bit of an art! :)
We sold an Airstream 3 times. Meaning, we had to keep re-possesing it.
Hence the need for crossing fences :lol:
 

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