The Resistant Starch Challenge: Is It The Key We've Been Looking For?

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Hello, new user here.

I read about 30 pages worth of posts and decided to skip to the end. Like many of you, I was interested in the positive effects of resistant starch, especially w.r.t. gut health, mood, etc. However, I was concerned about the fact that RS2s are used up primarily in the proximal colon and do little in the distal colon, and so I looked for a superior solution.

I knew that RS3s do a better job of staying unfermented longer, but isolated forms of RS3 are not easy to come by, especially those that do well in smoothies/shakes.

According to some studies, both independent as well as manufacturer-funded, these additives function similarly to RS3 in that they ferment all the way to the distal colon and can even end up in the feces. Plus, they are highly tolerable (up to ~40g/day).

Has anyone tried this stuff? Some links below:

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1541-4337.2006.tb00076.x/epdf
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0077128
http://cdn.intechopen.com/pdfs-wm/41117.pdf
 
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i am suffering from slow transit constipation which is caused by dysbiosis.

Due to the slow motility any fiber or probiotic taken orally makes my constipation worse.

are RS enemas a safe thing ? i really need that stuff to correct my dysbiosis
 
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Why You Should Upgrade Your Rice With Coconut Oil
While it’s not a very efficient way to get true biological MCTs, coconut oil serves an important role in your diet. It may not boost your brain and metabolism like Brain Octane Oil, but it’s an excellent source of cheap and abundant lauric acid, and it’s a beneficial addition to any diet.

According to a group of researchers who presented at The American Chemical Society in spring 2015, coconut oil may also be the key to upgrading your rice. Though the research on this is still preliminary, the results look promising, and doing it now doesn’t appear to have any risk.

The researchers steamed rice normally, making just two modest changes: they added coconut oil before cooking the rice, and afterward they cooled the rice down in a fridge. Researchers already knew that cooked-and cooled or parboiled rice were higher in resistant starch than freshly-steamed rice. [3]

The results were profound, though not for the reason the researchers report. The team focuses on the fact that the calories in the rice decreased by 10-12%, and they’re optimistic that with more research, they can raise that number to 60%.[1] However, if you’ve been reading about the Bulletproof Diet you know that calories don’t matter compared to hormones, and that when it comes to your health, quality trumps quantity.

But it’s nice to be able to eat a lot more rice without overloading on carbs!

So you don’t need to pay a lot of attention to the decreased calories themselves – but you DO want to care about the reason behind the decrease in calories.

When you cook coconut oil and rice together, the oil binds to the digestible starch in the rice – that’s the starch that converts to glucose. Once bound with the oil, the digestible starch begins to crystallize, creating another form of starch: the resistant variety. The researchers found that cooling the rice after cooking it promoted crystallization, leading to a shocking 10 to 15-fold increase in resistant starch compared to normally prepared white rice.[1]

They haven’t published their study yet, but the preliminary research shows promise.
 

JaimeS

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Sure I'll attach the recipes. They are fairly forgiving so feel free to experiment with ingredients. Tapioca flour could easily be increased, just reduce another flour proportionately (though coconut flour is more moisture absorbing).

I'm doing monthly uBiome tests for a while just to try to get a better idea of the pattern of change. Diversity is still not great - still missing a lot of things but some are coming back and the pattern is normalising.
AliceC, do you mind if I write this up for the Masterlist of ME-friendly Recipes? I would credit you, of course. :D

-J
 
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Does anyone know the cause of total absence of flatulence?

I have slow transit constipation. One bowel movements per week with no pain. I never pass gass. I read its healthy to fart 15 times a day but i never do.

Im taking 3tbsp RS with SBOs and still 0 flatulence. No change in constipation
 
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.....so feel free to experiment with ingredients. Tapioca flour could easily be increased, just reduce another flour proportionately (though coconut flour is more moisture absorbing).
alicec, I was interested in your recipes as GF not so much for prebiotic. I don't have the green bananas or chestnut flours at this stage and was wondering if they are necessary in terms of the baking consistency process. Would tapioca or potato starch or almond flours provide the same result?

Can these muffins be frozen?
 

alicec

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I don't have the green bananas or chestnut flours at this stage and was wondering if they are necessary in terms of the baking consistency process. Would tapioca or potato starch or almond flours provide the same result?

Can these muffins be frozen?
You could certainly change the flours but might need to adjust proportions of liquids a bit depending on what you use. As I mentioned the recipes are fairly forgiving.

The muffins freeze very well.
 

JaimeS

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I don't have the green bananas or chestnut flours at this stage and was wondering if they are necessary in terms of the baking consistency process. Would tapioca or potato starch or almond flours provide the same result?
@chrys ,

In my experience, you can replace GF flours by weight. I consider something like tapioca flour in the 'light' category; sorghum in the 'medium' category; and buckwheat in the 'heavy' category. If you replace a light flour with another light flour, or a heavy flour with another heavy flour, it should turn out okay. :)

If you find your flour isn't sticky enough or the dough isn't combining well, consider a little psyllium fiber (if that agrees with your digestive system) and that will fix the problem. :)

-J
 

alicec

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you can replace GF flours by weight
Yes that is a good way to do it. Coconut flour is heavy, green banana and chestnut flour fairly heavy, tiger nut flour medium and tapioca flour light.

Coconut flour absorbs liquid very readily so a tablespoon or two will usually fix a batter that is too thin.
 
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Was feeling really good last week now this week very bad. Only thing i stopped was RS.

I stopped due to my constipation getting worse. I started back on 1tsp and 4hrs later mood is back up. going to keep on 1tsp...

Tried prescript assist but again it worsened my constipation.
 

Sidereal

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Hi, @Sidereal I read your interaction with @Vegas about aloe vera mannan on this thread. Did you find it helpful? I googled & is it this product?

http://www.naturalhealthyconcepts.com/aloe-mannan-fx-PRL30-p-premier-research.html
Hi @Avengers26. The product I was using was this one:

http://www.swansonvitamins.com/swan...-dried-aloe-vera-powder-50-grams-1-76-oz-pwdr

Someone on PR, sadly I forget who, reported good effects from this product. It's hard for me to recall the specifics of what happened in 2014 but as far as I remember I didn't notice anything in particular that I would attribute to the aloe vera. I used it in combination with a bunch of different prebiotics, though.