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Carbohydrate-Insulin Model of Obesity: Beyond ‘Calories In, Calories Out’

GreenEdge

Senior Member
Messages
657
Location
Brisbane, Australia
The Carbohydrate-Insulin Model of Obesity: Beyond ‘Calories In, Calories Out’
...
A central problem with the Conventional Model of obesity (Figure 1a) is its inability to provide a satisfactory explanation for the obesity epidemic, beyond the difficulty many people have maintaining self-control in the modern environment. With weight loss, hunger predictably increases and energy expenditure declines – physiological adaptations that tend to push body weight back up.2 Why is the average person in the US and Western Europe “defending,” from a biological perspective, a body weight 25 to 30 lb greater today than 50 years ago? An answer to this question may point the way to more effective prevention, with practical implications for clinical treatment.

Carbohydrate-Insulin Model of Obesity.jpg

Explanatory Models of Obesity.
Panel A: Conventional Model; Panel B: Carbohydrate-Insulin Model

The evidence as I see it:
  1. Type 1 diabetes - in this condition, the pancreas makes little or no insulin. Before the invention of synthetic human insulin in 1978, this was a fatal condition due to chronic hyperglycemia (high blood glucose) causes β-cell defects by the excess accumulation of glucose intracellularly, and this leads to ER and mitochondrial stress. An alternative treatment is a zero carb diet, see: Facebook - Typeonegrit, YouTube - typeonegrit

  2. Type 2 diabetes - conventional treatment is: no dietary change + insulin injection.
    An alternative treatment, low carb/keto/carnivore results in reversal of disease and weight loss, see: Dr David Unwin - What predicts drug-free type 2 diabetes remission? #PHC2023

  3. In 1977, Dietary Goals was released by the American Society for Clinical Nutrition and encouraged the consumption of increased amounts of fruits, vegetables and carbohydrates, and decreased amounts of cholesterol, salt, alcohol and sugar as well as fewer eggs. in 1978, the American Heart Association provided additional professional support for dietary guidelines established by Dietary Goals. In 1980, USDA nutrition guidelines were first published - introducing the now well-known food pyramid.

    People changed their eating pattern and this is what happened:
    Obesity-NHANES.jpg


    Related YouTube videos:
    FAT: A Documentary - Health and Wellness Documentary
    FAT: A Documentary 2 (1080p) FULL MOVIE - Health & Wellness, Diet, Food
 
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Long Haul Mono

Senior Member
Messages
122
A couple of years ago I made an interesting personal discovery about carbs, but to-date I am unable to explain why. I have mild-to-moderate ME and consider this digestion issue to be a part of the "syndrome". It appears that others in this forum have also suggested digestion issues somewhat tied to their ME symptoms.

Carbs mess up my digestion, ie severe bloating, loss of appetite which remains hours after eating a carb meal, and the inevitable energy crash that follows. I used to enjoy a bowl of rolled oats in the morning. Over time this meal caused increasingly bad 'gut' reactions, but it wasn't isolated to oats; it included anything with 'sugars'.

I started evaluating my intake meal-by-meal, identifying meals that I reacted badly to and I reduced (and eventually eliminated) carbs from those meals. At the same time I increased the protein and (good) fats of those meals I altered.

In short, the weight seemed to have 'fallen of me' in what seemed very little time, but it appeared there was almost no muscle loss, ie I'm not "skin and bones". During this adjustment I didn't feel hungry due to the removal of carbs.

I still have problems with any kind of carbs, so I'm left with the questions of "what am I missing from my diet to cause this issue?" (that grew worse over the years), and "am I stuck on a carnivore-like diet for the rest of my life?".

The latter question is of the most concern as I basically can't find anything when I'm out for most of the day. Fast food outlets, coffee shops, other similar (or healthier) food outlets are bound to have a menu filled with carbs and/or additives that could set the digestion off in a bad way.

Lastly, the post (above) mentioned insulin. By suggestion from a dietician I bought a cheap insulin monitor and did a check before and after a high carb (sugary) meal. All measurements were nominal. I'm not sure if that rules insulin issues out or not.
 

GreenEdge

Senior Member
Messages
657
Location
Brisbane, Australia
It appears that others in this forum have also suggested digestion issues somewhat tied to their ME symptoms.
Since many of us have digestion issues, I suspect that ME/CFS is an autoimmune condition.

I increased the protein and (good) fats
Yes, all the nutrients in animal fats are in the active form our brains require:
  • Vitamin A as retinol, retinal, retinoic acid - not beta-carotene from plants that difficult to convert.
  • Vitamin D3 - not D2.
  • Vitamin E as α-tocopherol - not γ-tocopherol and tocotrienols that predominate vegetable seed oils.
  • Vitamin K2 - not K1.
  • Omega 3 DHA and EPA - not ALA. Only 5–10% and 2–5% of ALA in healthy adults is converted to EPA and DHA.
 
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GreenEdge

Senior Member
Messages
657
Location
Brisbane, Australia
I started evaluating my intake meal-by-meal, identifying meals that I reacted badly to and I reduced (and eventually eliminated) carbs from those meals. At the same time I increased the protein and (good) fats of those meals I altered.
Wow, so you have eliminated carbs by just listening to you body. How long have you been carnivore?

In short, the weight seemed to have 'fallen off me' in what seemed very little time, but it appeared there was almost no muscle loss, ie I'm not "skin and bones". During this adjustment I didn't feel hungry due to the removal of carbs.
Yes, if you eat enough fat you will not loose muscle mass. I found I increased weight while becoming leaner, so I must have gained muscle mass. My muscles are not noticeably larger, just firmer. Like muscle has lost fat and become more dense.

If one doesn't eat enough fat and their fat stores can't be accessed due to raised insulin, some dietary protein might be converted into glucose for energy (raising insulin). That process and maintaining muscle mass is expensive in terms of energy, so may result in some muscle loss to reduce the bodies energy requirements.

Many people try to get into carnivore too quickly or get into trouble because they fear fat and don't eat enough. People need to start slow. A low fat diet can cause gallstones to form in the gallbladder. They need to allow time for (gallstones to dissolve) and gallbladder to heal to be able to excrete enough bile in order to digest fats again. So in the lead in phase, whilst reducing carbs they should simultaneously gradually increase red meat consumption to slowly increase fat intake. Allow 6-8 weeks to transition into carnivore.
 
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GreenEdge

Senior Member
Messages
657
Location
Brisbane, Australia
I still have problems with any kind of carbs, so I'm left with the questions of "what am I missing from my diet to cause this issue?" (that grew worse over the years), and "am I stuck on a carnivore-like diet for the rest of my life?".
My advice is listen to your body and keep following your instincts. You are becoming more natural. We eat to live. It's not the other way around. Food should not be seen as entertainment.

Maybe in ME/CFS, our immune system is so overwhelmed with inflammation and autoimmune issues that it's loosing the battle and can't get ahead until we remove inflammatory foods. IMHO: Fiber, beans, nuts, seeds and seed oils are the worst. Seeds are plant babies so that's the most defended part of plants. Since plants can't move, their defense is toxins.

A leaky gut leads to autoimmune conditions. Leaky gut syndrome is a proposed intestinal condition in which a weakening of the intestinal walls allows bacteria and toxins into the bloodstream. The immune system reacts to these foreign particles and might end up attacking itself (autoimmune condition).

The carnivore community say that to recover from autoimmune conditions one must adhere to the lion diet.

And they say after healing you will be able to tolerate a wider range of foods again.
 

GreenEdge

Senior Member
Messages
657
Location
Brisbane, Australia
The latter question is of the most concern as I basically can't find anything when I'm out for most of the day. Fast food outlets, coffee shops, other similar (or healthier) food outlets are bound to have a menu filled with carbs and/or additives that could set the digestion off in a bad way.
Sugar is in almost everything and it's so accepted as normal that everyone is unknowingly addicted to it. It seems to make people fat and stupid (dementia is type 3 diabetes). When shopping, I don't even see processed food as food anymore. I only go in for the non-food stuff and when I do, I feel like I'm surrounded by unhealthy people staring at me because I look anorexic to them. It's starting to feel like a zombie apocalypse.

I fear being in a situation where I need to eat junk food. To give myself more freedom, I'm getting used to fasting by doing it more often. Fasting is even more powerful for healing because it gives our digestion system a break.

Carnivore = little inflammation, Lion diet = very little inflammation, Fasting = zero inflammation.
 
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Long Haul Mono

Senior Member
Messages
122
Yes, all the nutrients in animal fats are in the active form our brains require:
  • Vitamin A as retinol, retinal, retinoic acid - not beta-carotene from plants that difficult to convert.
  • Vitamin D3 - not D2.
  • Vitamin E as α-tocopherol - not γ-tocopherol and tocotrienols that predominate vegetable seed oils.
  • Vitamin K2 - not K1.
  • Omega 3 DHA and EPA - not ALA. Only 5–10% and 2–5% of ALA in healthy adults is converted to EPA and DHA.
The extended list of supplements I take (that seems to be ever-growing) includes (Activated) D3 and the 'Thorne' brand of K1&K2. So why not K1?

Vitamin E has been recommended to me as well. At the moment I've paused any increase to my supplement list as it gets real expensive, real fast, and I need to justify any new supplement is going to assist with 'something' and not just take it anyway.

Wow, so you have eliminated carbs by just listening to you body. How long have you been carnivore?
It would possibly be 2+ years now, maybe more. Sorry, my memory is real patchy.
I should mention it is roughly 99% carnivore. I still have a small amount of raw leafy vegetables and (to a lesser extent) Mozzarella cheese.

My advice is listen to your body and keep following your instincts. You are becoming more natural. We eat to live. It's not the other way around. Food should not be seen as entertainment.
After years of calorie counting and trying the blood group diet, I finally came to that conclusion. Pay attention to the signals coming from below, and I get some real nasty 'signals' when I get it wrong.
Additional to 'listen to your body', I also found consistent, warm weather keeps the symptoms to a minimum. Typically my symptoms 'lessen' between late Jan to May. This is why I'm currently arranging to relocate north. I'm in Canberra ATM and I'm not built for these winters.

Maybe in ME/CFS, our immune system is so overwhelmed with inflammation and autoimmune issues that it's loosing the battle and can't get ahead until we remove inflammatory foods. IMHO: Fiber, beans, nuts, seeds and seed oils are the worst. Seeds are plant babies so that's the most defended part of plants. Since plants can't move, their defense is toxins.
Seeds? Would that include walnuts? That's another thing I have that strays from a pure carnivore diet but I'm starting to think it may not be doing me good. Slight bloating, but I'm not conclusive as to whether it is the cause.

Inflammation has been the primary concern, and it's a strange one.
If I don't lift weights for a number of days the inflammation starts to 'build up' in muscles and tendons. This 'injury like' feeling doesn't happen due to over-exertion or careless maneuvers, it just appears after being inactive for a prolonged period of time.
I find weight training seems to 'squeeze' the inflammation out. Many times after a workout, when I had elbow or wrist pain, it would fade away in the days that followed the workout.
 

GreenEdge

Senior Member
Messages
657
Location
Brisbane, Australia
The extended list of supplements I take (that seems to be ever-growing) includes (Activated) D3 and the 'Thorne' brand of K1&K2. So why not K1?
K1 is the plant form and K2 is the animal form we require. Converting the plant version of a vitamin into the active animal form is a slow inefficient process. A quick google search says: “Your body can partly convert vitamin K1 to K2. However, only 10-15% of ingested vitamin K1 is absorbed in the digestive tract.”

Vitamin E has been recommended to me as well. At the moment I've paused any increase to my supplement list as it gets real expensive, real fast, and I need to justify any new supplement is going to assist with 'something' and not just take it anyway.
It's better to get all your nutrients naturally from what you eat. With carnivore you're already getting all the nutrients you need. The fatty meat of herbivores is what's best for us and contains everything we need. The animal fat contains all the nutrients our brains need. Unlike other carnivores, we need the fat. Fat is more important to us than the protein. And this makes sense, we have a highly acidic stomach like a scavenger.

I think humans evolved as scavengers that followed carnivores and scavenged on their left overs. We smashed open the skull and leg bones to get the brain and bone marrow. We also ate whatever meat the carnivore couldn't get. Having hands with opposed thumbs gives us a better ability to pull things apart and get at the meat up inside the rib cage for example. We evolved to thrive mostly on animal fat.

We can't survive on lean meat like other carnivores. If we don't eat enough fat with our meat we can get a condition know as protein poisoning (also referred to colloquially as rabbit starvation, mal de caribou, or fat starvation) - an acute form of malnutrition caused by a diet deficient in fat. The term rabbit starvation comes from shipwreck survivors stuck on an island with only rabbits that succumb to a fat deficient diet and eventually die. Rabbit meat is too lean for us. Our big brains need the fat nutrients.

'Fativore' more accurately describe what humans are. See: Growing a Big Brain with Meat | Amber O'Hearn

After free range eggs, beef and lamb are more nutrient dense and 'complete' than any other food. 'Complete protein' means it contains all our essential amino acids. Animal sourced also ensures that those amino's are in the proportions that we require.

I used to take a huge number of supplements too. I now only take a few and will be phasing them out. The only nutrient I will keep is Magnesium Taurinate. Magnesium is an important mineral that we would have got drinking stream water. Tap water is deficient in magnesium due to how it's processed. Taurine is an essential amino acid that helps with things like your digestive, cardiovascular, skeletal, muscular, and nervous system functions. Taurine is destroyed by cooking but humans have been cooking meat for 100's of thousands of years. For example, cats can not survive on cooked meat (they must have raw meat).

It would possibly be 2+ years now, maybe more. Sorry, my memory is real patchy.
Me too, my brains is not the best, however it's improving. The latest science is saying dementia is a metabolic disease and some are now calling it type 3 diabetes. Sugar is making humans fat and stupid.

I now eat an equal amount (in volume) of fat and muscle meat. I get lamb fat trimmings from my local butcher and eat it cut up into little pieces and frozen. I find when eaten frozen it doesn't upset my stomach. If we eat too little fat we get constipation and if we eat too much we get soft stools or diarrhea. Adjust your fat consumption accordingly.

I should mention it is roughly 99% carnivore. I still have a small amount of raw leafy vegetables and (to a lesser extent) Mozzarella cheese.
Why are you doing that? Adding vegetables to a meat meal makes it less nutritious because of anti-nutrients - plant compounds that reduce the body's ability to absorb essential nutrients. Adult carnivores find they do better without diary products. Diary stimulates appetite because milk is designed to grow baby into an adult as quickly as possible to avoid predation (from other carnivores). Cheese is like concentrated milk.

After years of calorie counting and trying the blood group diet, I finally came to that conclusion. Pay attention to the signals coming from below, and I get some real nasty 'signals' when I get it wrong.
Yes, when you eat 'well' for some time, your body certainly lets you know if you eat something it doesn't like.

Additional to 'listen to your body', I also found consistent, warm weather keeps the symptoms to a minimum. Typically my symptoms 'lessen' between late Jan to May. This is why I'm currently arranging to relocate north. I'm in Canberra ATM and I'm not built for these winters.
I didn't know you were Australian. If you ever come up to Brisbane let's meet up.

Seeds? Would that include walnuts? That's another thing I have that strays from a pure carnivore diet but I'm starting to think it may not be doing me good. Slight bloating, but I'm not conclusive as to whether it is the cause.
I think you intuitively know the answer. Yes, walnuts are seeds.

Inflammation has been the primary concern, and it's a strange one.
If I don't lift weights for a number of days the inflammation starts to 'build up' in muscles and tendons. This 'injury like' feeling doesn't happen due to over-exertion or careless maneuvers, it just appears after being inactive for a prolonged period of time.
I find weight training seems to 'squeeze' the inflammation out. Many times after a workout, when I had elbow or wrist pain, it would fade away in the days that followed the workout.
Pain = inflammation. Exercising will temporarily remove the pain but that's due to a release of endorphins.

Sounds like you're over exercising or too often. I've heard a number of carnivore promoting doctors say they no longer prescribe exercise because they've found that their patients will spontaneously start exercising again when their bodies have sufficiently healed.
 

Long Haul Mono

Senior Member
Messages
122
Firstly, thanks for all the info. It's given me plenty of 'food for thought' (pardon the pun).

I'm not a big fan of animal fats, ie I cut off all of that (as much as possible before cooking), but your point was taken that I need to review my fat intake.
This afternoon I got some fish oil and flaxseed oil and will give them a test run, slowly replacing/eliminating the non-carnivore components of my current food intake.

We can't survive on lean meat like other carnivores. If we don't eat enough fat with our meat we can get a condition know as protein poisoning (also referred to colloquially as rabbit starvation, mal de caribou, or fat starvation) - an acute form of malnutrition caused by a diet deficient in fat. The term rabbit starvation comes from shipwreck survivors stuck on an island with only rabbits that succumb to a fat deficient diet and eventually die. Rabbit meat is too lean for us. Our big brains need the fat nutrients.
I've never heard of 'rabbit starvation' or 'protein poisoning' before. Thanks for the info on that.

I now eat an equal amount (in volume) of fat and muscle meat. I get lamb fat trimmings from my local butcher and eat it cut up into little pieces and frozen. I find when eaten frozen it doesn't upset my stomach. If we eat too little fat we get constipation and if we eat too much we get soft stools or diarrhea. Adjust your fat consumption accordingly.
Constipation has been a seemingly cyclical problem that I thought was tied to fatigue crashes and/or those "bad days" when all I could do was sleep.
I'm interested to see what happens with the re-introduction of flaxseed and fish oils, ie I've had them before but gave up on them some time before heading in the carnivore direction. I guess my timing was a bit off. ;)

Why are you doing that? Adding vegetables to a meat meal makes it less nutritious because of anti-nutrients - plant compounds that reduce the body's ability to absorb essential nutrients. Adult carnivores find they do better without diary products. Diary stimulates appetite because milk is designed to grow baby into an adult as quickly as possible to avoid predation (from other carnivores). Cheese is like concentrated milk.
With the constipation problem coming and going, and with no explanation I thought leafy vegetables (fibrous carbs) would help, but in review it appears it doesn't.
While I was settling in on the new diet changes I thought I'd try adding cheese to add in more fat, particularly to kangaroo steaks which have almost zero fat and carbs. I think I'll phase that one out too.
I use protein powders as a meal replacement and/or post workout drink but found the Whey (dairy) type was causing bloating. This gradually got worse over time so I switched to unflavoured Pea-based protein, which has almost no carbs. I'm not sure what other options I could explore. Protein shakes are convenient/quick to make up as opposed to cooking yet another meal.

I didn't know you were Australian. If you ever come up to Brisbane let's meet up.
It would be good to meet up when I get there. It'll take a few months due to the ME acting like a boat anchor slowing me down. Canberra's (fast approaching) cold weather will act as a "major incentive". :oh-dear:
I'm looking at rental properties at the moment, so if you can suggest any suburbs to consider/avoid I'd be happy to hear. At the moment I'm considering around the Mitchelton or Amberly areas.

Pain = inflammation. Exercising will temporarily remove the pain but that's due to a release of endorphins.

Sounds like you're over exercising or too often. I've heard a number of carnivore promoting doctors say they no longer prescribe exercise because they've found that their patients will spontaneously start exercising again when their bodies have sufficiently healed.
I'm not sure what I experienced could be considered as an endorphin release. From my understanding, this is temporary and the pain soon returns when the endorphins are gone.

Long story short, one recent example was a painful wrist. No over-exertion, no injury, I just woke up one morning and it was there, and no workout the day before. Following a (careful) workout the pain reduced over the next few days and has not come back so far. It's been a few weeks since.
 

GreenEdge

Senior Member
Messages
657
Location
Brisbane, Australia
I'm not a big fan of animal fats
Okay, try starting with bacon. Bacon is a great place to start because everyone loves bacon. Eggs also contain a good amount of fat and you can scramble them in pure butter to add more fat. After bacon, try non-cured pork, eg. pork belly steak.

Pork is not the best meat because a pig is a mono-gastric (single stomach) animal, and pigs are often fed waste fruit and vegetables, so you will get some plant toxins from eating pork. You will find this out yourself by listening to your body and may end up preferring beef over lamb. Lamb fat has about 8X more omega-3 content than beef fat.

For frying don't use vegetable oil. Use a fat that's solid at room temperature like lard, tallow, ghee or coconut oil. What I use is WiK dripping which is 100% animal fat. You'll find it in Coles where the butter and margarine is.

This afternoon I got some fish oil and flaxseed oil and will give them a test run, slowly replacing/eliminating the non-carnivore components of my current food intake.
Possibly a bad move, read this thread. Taste it first to make sure it's not rancid. Liquid fat will act as a laxative so it can help with constipation.

With the constipation problem coming and going, and with no explanation I thought leafy vegetables (fibrous carbs) would help, but in review it appears it doesn't.
I used to be the same, but with fatty red meat that problem has completely resolved.

I use protein powders as a meal replacement and/or post workout drink...
Post workout, try just Leucine capsules and water. The essential amino acids will come later from your next meal. By then, your body will know how much to eat.
 
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GreenEdge

Senior Member
Messages
657
Location
Brisbane, Australia

GreenEdge

Senior Member
Messages
657
Location
Brisbane, Australia
It would be good to meet up when I get there. It'll take a few months due to the ME acting like a boat anchor slowing me down. Canberra's (fast approaching) cold weather will act as a "major incentive". :oh-dear:
I'm looking at rental properties at the moment, so if you can suggest any suburbs to consider/avoid I'd be happy to hear.
Avoid Wacol and surrounding suburbs between Brisbane and Ipswich.
I like the western suburbs near Indooroopilly. I'm close to Mt Cootha and Queensland Uni.
I guess in any city, near to river, with a view, hilly areas, near shopping centers are the most affluent.

At the moment I'm considering around the Mitchelton or Amberly areas.
Mitchelton and Annerley are good.

What do I want to be near to? Butcher, bush land, lake, school/university, sport, park, shop, church, family, friends...
Near to but not too close? Freeway, highway, beach, wetland, stadium, airport...
And avoid? Rubbish dump, sewage treatment plant, smelly factory, swamp, racetrack, airport, flight paths, jail...
 
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Long Haul Mono

Senior Member
Messages
122
What do I want to be near to? Butcher, bush land, lake, school/university, sport, park, shop, church, family, friends...
Near to but not too close? Freeway, highway, beach, wetland, stadium, airport...
And avoid? Rubbish dump, sewage treatment plant, smelly factory, swamp, racetrack, airport, flight paths, jail...
I'll be starting with a rental place with the future prospect of getting familiar with the different suburbs and then looking to buy a place. Renting close to Amberly or Enoggera is what I'm considering at the moment, but rental costs are also a factor.

I usually avoid suburbs where you'll find a concentration of:
- Lowered cars with loud techno blasting out of them.
- Graffiti
- Disassembled car bodies in the front yard of houses.
...as well as the above mentioned "Rubbish dump, sewage treatment plant, smelly factory, swamp, racetrack, airport, flight paths, jail..."

So it'll be a balance of rental costs vs the avoidance of the above listed.
 

heapsreal

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I'll be starting with a rental place with the future prospect of getting familiar with the different suburbs and then looking to buy a place. Renting close to Amberly or Enoggera is what I'm considering at the moment, but rental costs are also a factor.

I usually avoid suburbs where you'll find a concentration of:
- Lowered cars with loud techno blasting out of them.
- Graffiti
- Disassembled car bodies in the front yard of houses.
...as well as the above mentioned "Rubbish dump, sewage treatment plant, smelly factory, swamp, racetrack, airport, flight paths, jail..."

So it'll be a balance of rental costs vs the avoidance of the above listed.

So not Woodridge lol

I grew up there and it's deteriorated from my childhood but then I think the whole South East Qld has gone down hill.
 

heapsreal

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I think the big benefit of low carb eating is it reduces your appetite significantly, after following the diet 3-5 days as ketones kick in.
Im a big guy but I found I naturally eat 2 meals a day when low carbing and some days snack on some cheese or a protein bar. So I think with the calories in, calories out fits into that equation through its appetite suppression.
Currently I'm just tracking my calories and not cutting them back much, so I'm actually eating some junk food but staying within my calorie limit. Red rooster chips taste so good 👍.
My macro breakdown is probably a 3rd carbs, 3rd protein and 3rd fat. I eat some protein with most meals. Currently been eating like this about 6weeks and don't feel hungry, but I'm not in a big deficit.
I'm currently eating this way so I can eat a variety of things and enjoy some junk and to maintain or very slowly lose wt. I've been back in the gym 2 months now for 2 months and find having carbs in my diet helps with exercise. But I will go back to a low carb diet down the track again to lose more body fat faster.
I'm currently not working as on paid long service leave and it's much easier to recover from exercise when not working. When I do go back to work, it will be harder to train and recover, so will have to look at much shorter, less frequent workouts. With 10 being normal, I'm probably functioning at an 8 or 9 with greatly reduced pem.
 

Long Haul Mono

Senior Member
Messages
122
I think it might be the same with all capital cities as well as I've been there too long lol.
Yeah, I think I'm over Canberra, but agree there's ideal location to move to (that comes to mind). I'm moving up there for medical reasons.

I'm a few days in making some adjustments to the current diet (based on what's been discussed in this thread), ie getting rid of foods that either don't agree with me or are not aligned with a carnivore diet.

As for walnuts...

I think you intuitively know the answer. Yes, walnuts are seeds.
I stopped these and noticed a difference, ie no unsettled, bloated feeling. They may have also been causing something like (a mild case of) hyperventilation. So far I haven't had any such symptoms. It got fairly bad at one stage and may have come from a number of things I've since removed from my diet.

At this stage my diet could be described as "approaching carnivore" as animal fats are hard for me to digest, but there's a growing list of foods I can't have anymore.

I've increased/replaced fats with fish oil and flaxseed oil. I'm aware it's not really aligned with carnivore but, small steps.

Oddly, with the amount of these fats from the above sources I'm still feeling hungry, so more adjustments required.

Ditching caffeine energy drinks has had a good effect. I'm not feeling bloated anymore. I think I need to say goodbye to coffee/energy drinks for good. I can conclude (after many years on and off them) that caffeine just doesn't work for me.

...for now, the story continues.
 
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