Low-dose naltrexone (LDN) - how's it working for you?

I've been on LDN for...


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I get that, but what’s in question, can LDN as a drug, cause increased stomach acid, regardless of how it is administered? A couple of people have told me yes, it can. But everyone is different, so another trial is the only way to know. Thank you for your help.
No, not that I am aware of. In all the issues with digestive problems that I have known, its the filler and switching it to a better filler like ginger or sucrose, taking sublingual and taking with food solves the problem.

Sorry to hear you have such bad stomach issues. Good luck.
 
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I was on 2mg naltrexone and want to go back on.
Also it kinda modulates dopamine I think or sensitizes D2 receptors at these tiny dosages. Useful if get depressed clinically.

I mixed my LDN with bupropion and modafinil at the time from reading this paper. It was better then nothing. I want to go back. Helped inflammation and was in bed less.
Heres the paper where they tried mixing it.

https://ldnresearchtrust.org/sites/default/files/LDN_Depression_paper.pdf
 
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I've been on LDN for five months now, now at 1.5 mg and trying to go up to 4.5 mg. We get 1.5mg pills here in Finland and I had to start with 1/4 pills (0.375 mg). I get horrible side effects (nausea, headache, dizziness, stomach upset, fatigue, general ill feeling) every time I try to increase the dose by even a little bit and it takes my body like 6 weeks to adjust to a new dose. I've been so close to quitting the whole thing... But then I come here and read all your comments again and it gives me hope. I've had ME since 2008 and I've slowly declined from mild to moderate, though my symptoms fluctuate a lot. I need to see if LDN helps.

I think LDN has made my muscle pain more bearable and perhaps helped with brain fog. I'm thinking of trying to slowly increase the dose up to 4.5 mg and staying on that for at least a couple months to see if it's really working. I'll just have to bear with the side effects until then. 😵
 
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I am on 4.5mg/day and it has a beneficial effect on sleep. However, it does create a disturbed sleep pattern. I take it before sleep currently, and sleep for about three hours. Then I wake up. I am awake several hours, then I can go back to bed. I think this is about when LDN stops working. I start feeling better - and my body says wake up. However, when I go back to sleep I am able to get good quality sleep for as long as I need.

I tried taking it in the morning. I feel good enough that I think I can do things. My normal warning signs that I am doing too much are mostly not there - so I overdo things and crash. The only warning sign, which seems to be reliable, is when I start breathing harder. I think thats a result of crossing the aerobic threshold.

My fatigue is very noticably less at some times of the day, but not all the time. I don't know if this is better sleep or endorphins. I also seem to bounce back from a crash even faster. When I was at my worst in the 90s I would take in excess of two week to recover from even a mild crash. I don't know how long because I would crash at least once every two weeks, if not every few days. In the last couple of years I have bounced back in a day or three. Last week I bounced back in twelve hours. Now I might not have overdone things much, and so recovered faster, but its still a good sign.

The only other treatment I am on at the moment is Thorne B-Complex formula 12.

Bye, Alex
I found sometimes higher doses don't work as well. I emailed one of the authors of this paper and he said 1mg worked the best basically. They even experimented with microdoseing naltrexone and found the super low doses may have more agonist properties. Also this study was only for depression but the idea has overlap. Also this is just my opinion and different things work for different people. I really like the Thorne methylguard plus it helped which is rare for me. I hope you find some more things that work for you and help you feel better.

Mischoulon, David, et al. "Randomized, proof-of-concept trial of low dose naltrexone for patients with breakthrough symptoms of major depressive disorder on antidepressants." Journal of Affective Disorders 208 (2017): 6-14.