Doxycycline as a CCI treatment: low-dose doxycycline inhibits the MMP enzymes which break down collagen and elastin in ligaments

Hip

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Yes, I saw that one. I would guess it might vary quite a lot depending on the strain? I notice that you posted about high dose fish oil reducing MMPs. I’d like to try that, but I would be concerned about it reducing NK cell function.
Reduced NK cell activity might be a consideration. Though high-dose fish oil in the form of VegEPA has been studied as an ME/CFS treatment, where it helps some patients (maybe those with CCI?).
 

Hip

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Perhaps fisetin is also worth considering?

‘...fisetin, abundant in many fruits and vegetables. In addition to inhibition of MMP-14, fisetin inhibits MMP-1, MMP-3, MMP-7, and MMP-9, more efficiently than a naturally occurring MMP inhibitor tetracycline.’

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/24099040/
Looks very interesting.

But note that this is an in vitro study, a which means the MMP inhibition effects may not necessarily pan out in vivo, when this supplement is taken orally. The usual reason why in vitro studies do not pan out in vivo is that the concentrations of the compound used in vitro are too high to be obtained in vivo, because of limiting factors such as low bioavailability, or high plasma protein binding.

In fact, the study you linked to says:
Therefore, fisetin, as a potent natural inhibitor of MMPs, could be valuable as a lead compound to develop therapeutic drugs with greater bioavailability for treatment of MMP-related diseases
So they are saying that if you modified the chemical structure of fisetin to make it more bioavailable then it could be used as an effective MMP inhibitor.

This paper says that liposomal encapsulation of fisetin improves bioavailability.
 
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Looks very interesting.

But note that this is an in vitro study, a which means the MMP inhibition effects may not necessarily pan out in vivo, when this supplement is taken orally. The usual reason why in vitro studies do not pan out in vivo is that the concentrations of the compound used in vitro are too high to be obtained in vivo, because of limiting factors such as low bioavailability, or high plasma protein binding.

In fact, the study you linked to says:

So they are saying that if you modified the chemical structure of fisetin to make it more bioavailable then it could be used as an effective MMP inhibitor.

This paper says that liposomal encapsulation of fisetin improves bioavailability.
I see. And yes, now you mention it - I have read that fisetin has low bioavailability.

Also, not necessarily related, but it has helped this person with their fatigue: https://www.syndromea.org/2019/07/23/could-fisetin-be-a-new-treatment-for-me-cfs-autism/
 

Hip

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