Coffee Enemas!!

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The only Yasko CBS SNP which has any impact is C699T, and it's a very mild and beneficial one. It doesn't cause sulfur problems, or the build-up of ammonia.
I don't follow Yasko because her protocols don't work for me at all. I find heartfixer Robert's protocol (and some others, I cut and paste as needed) better esp because he says he is hetero CBS C699T himself (I'm ++) so has some personal experience. He follows Yasko to a certain extent but I ignore that part at least in terms of supplementation. Yasko is fine as a researcher but terrible for treatments. Her supplements, and most of her recommendations, are terrible (in my experience anyway).
 
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@Hip Would adding salt to the enema prevent the caffeine etc from being absorbed? I read some claiming that.

There was a lady who popularized Coffee salt and bicarb enemas in the 1930s i think.

I would really like to find a way to use these safely, as the benefits are very good.

@Aerowallah I tried a coffee enema this morning and still experienced minor irritation a few hours after. However i believe it is because i could not fully evacuate the solution leaving coffee in my colon.

I used 2TBSP coffee with 500ml distilled water and 2TBSP aloe vera.

I might get some PH strips to try getting the solution less acidic, or try an enema after to flush out the coffee.
 
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Hip

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@Hip Would adding salt to the enema prevent the caffeine etc from being absorbed? I read some claiming that.
Not entirely sure, but I guess it's a possibility, given the way osmosis works.

But I should think that anyone who performs regular coffee enemas, and is familiar with their effects, could try a coffee enema using physiological solution instead of plain water, and observe whether the effects were in any way reduced.
 
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Not entirely sure, but I guess it's a possibility, given the way osmosis works.

But I should think that anyone who performs regular coffee enemas, and is familiar with their effects, could try a coffee enema using physiological solution instead of plain water, and observe whether the effects were in any way reduced.
I think i will try it. However in my experience adding salt to a plain enema made it very difficult to expel compared to plain water, however i have IBS-C.

How much baking soda would you recommend ? I think my recipe will be 1L distilled water & 2TBSP coffee. I have read distilled water is quite acidic
 
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@Hip Would adding salt to the enema prevent the caffeine etc from being absorbed? I read some claiming that.

There was a lady who popularized Coffee salt and bicarb enemas in the 1930s i think.

I would really like to find a way to use these safely, as the benefits are very good.

@Aerowallah I tried a coffee enema this morning and still experienced minor irritation a few hours after. However i believe it is because i could not fully evacuate the solution leaving coffee in my colon.

I used 2TBSP coffee with 500ml distilled water and 2TBSP aloe vera.

I might get some PH strips to try getting the solution less acidic, or try an enema after to flush out the coffee.
Distilled water is acidic.
I've never heard of anyone using aloe vera in an enema.
 

Hip

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How much baking soda would you recommend ? I think my recipe will be 1L distilled water & 2TBSP coffee. I have read distilled water is quite acidic
I think you would have to do this with pH strips which measure the pH, and add just enough bicarbonate to make the coffee solution neutral (pH 7). If you added too much bicarbonate, you'd start to make your solution alkaline, and that is just as bad as being too acidic, according to the study.

I am not even sure what kind of pH level you will have in the coffee solution to start with. It may in fact be quite close to pH 7 already. Without high accuracy pH strips, you will not know the pH.

Distilled water is neutral, pH 7 (at least at 25ºC — see here).



Distilled water is acidic.
Distilled water is neutral.
 
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Distilled water is acidic.
I've never heard of anyone using aloe vera in an enema.
Think alot with ulcerative collitis use them. Its the aloe vera juice.

Anyway i am going to buy PH strips today and see if i can make it neutral. Then maybe include a plain enema after to be sure the coffee has left the colon. Will update with results
 
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I think you would have to do this with pH strips which measure the pH, and add just enough bicarbonate to make the coffee solution neutral (pH 7). If you added too much bicarbonate, you'd start to make your solution alkaline, and that is just as bad as being too acidic, according to the study.

I am not even sure what kind of pH level you will have in the coffee solution to start with. It may in fact be quite close to pH 7 already. Without high accuracy pH strips, you will not know the pH.

Distilled water is neutral, pH 7 (at least at 25ºC — see here).





Distilled water is neutral.
Not according to my pH strips and distiller, maybe it depends on the system.
 
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I think you would have to do this with pH strips which measure the pH, and add just enough bicarbonate to make the coffee solution neutral (pH 7). If you added too much bicarbonate, you'd start to make your solution alkaline, and that is just as bad as being too acidic, according to the study.

I am not even sure what kind of pH level you will have in the coffee solution to start with. It may in fact be quite close to pH 7 already. Without high accuracy pH strips, you will not know the pH.

Distilled water is neutral, pH 7 (at least at 25ºC — see here).





Distilled water is neutral.
It's true that distilled water is acidic, whether it comes from a store-bought jug or a distiller at home. The acidity occurs because carbon dioxide from the atmosphere dissolves in the water, creating a very dilute solution of carbonic acid. Distilled water in a container that’s been sitting open for a while could have a pH in the range of 6.
http://www.drdavidwilliams.com/distilled-water/
 
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What do you guys think of using caffeine drops in plain water? To bypass the irritants

By the way i managed to read this entire thread today and I must say i like how an interesting discussion formed. This is what i love about forums and the web. We can brainstorm and find ways to improve our lives
 
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I think i will try it. However in my experience adding salt to a plain enema made it very difficult to expel compared to plain water, however i have IBS-C.

How much baking soda would you recommend ? I think my recipe will be 1L distilled water & 2TBSP coffee. I have read distilled water is quite acidic
Thinking about this, I don't know how beneficial CE's are for IBS. I was diagnosed with that about 15 years ago but removing gluten and taking a lot of iodine and soil probiotics got rid of it. I think of CE's as being for the liver. The route is intestinal but that's not the target. Maybe ask other people with IBS if CE's help that. Have you tried Berberine? I take that every day now and it's the most amazing thing for bowel health I've ever come across. Anything remotely resembling IBS is ancient history to me.

Here, these are just the first that came up on google:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26400188
http://www.timeforwellness.org/blog-view/berberine-reduces-digestive-symptoms-505
 
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Thinking about this, I don't know how beneficial CE's are for IBS. I was diagnosed with that about 15 years ago but removing gluten and taking a lot of iodine and soil probiotics got rid of it. I think of CE's as being for the liver. The route is intestinal but that's not the target. Maybe ask other people with IBS if CE's help that. Have you tried Berberine? I take that every day now and it's the most amazing thing for bowel health I've ever come across. Anything remotely resembling IBS is ancient history to me.

Here, these are just the first that came up on google:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26400188
http://www.timeforwellness.org/blog-view/berberine-reduces-digestive-symptoms-505
Hi

Thanks for the suggestion, however i am not using CEs for IBS. I am using them for liver support as i am chelating mercury
 

Hip

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Not according to my pH strips and distiller, maybe it depends on the system.
If the water is pure with nothing else in it, it will be pH 7. This is one of the first things they teach in school chemistry.
 
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@Hip there never was a study on coffee enemas and Gluthathione.

If i recall correctly they fed rats coffee beans and it raised gluthathione.

So im guessing people ended up parroting that.

The study showing rectal coffee had less caffeine absorption was interesting, but i don't think that's why there us a difference. I mean you could take 3TBSP coffee rectally and it would probably relax you while 1TBSP orally would stimulate you
 

Valentijn

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I find heartfixer Robert's protocol (and some others, I cut and paste as needed) better esp because he says he is hetero CBS C699T himself (I'm ++) so has some personal experience.
Both of their claims are based on Yasko as a source, who is also quite bad at interpreting research. Her claims are completely baseless.

Regarding Dr Jockers being heterozygous, the so-called "risk" allele has a 30% or higher allele rate in Caucasians. 42% of Caucasians are therefore heterozygous for it, and another 9% are homozygous for it. Prevalence rate for aggregated ethnic groups are only marginally lower.

So over half of Caucasians "have" that CBS SNP. And if we add in the other two very common CBS SNPs which don't do anything, I'm sure we can bring that up to around 90%.

Does that mean 90% of the world have ammonia issues? Not even close. But if any random patient with sulfur intolerance or similar symptoms walks into the clinics of one of those doctors, odds are very good that they will have a CBS variant - because nearly everyone on the planet has those variants.

If these clinicians were doing research, they'd see that the healthy non-symptomatic controls have the same variants at the same rates. And to reach even their "clinical" conclusions, they are ignoring and/or contradicting both the existing research into the effects of those SNPs, as well as the known prevalence rates of those SNPs in the general population.

Blaming those SNPs for symptoms is nearly as pointless as saying that having 10 fingers causes the same symptoms. Those CBS variants don't indicate dysfunction ... they just indicate that the patient is a standard human being.
 
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Both of their claims are based on Yasko as a source, who is also quite bad at interpreting research. Her claims are completely baseless.

Regarding Dr Jockers being heterozygous, the so-called "risk" allele has a 30% or higher allele rate in Caucasians. 42% of Caucasians are therefore heterozygous for it, and another 9% are homozygous for it. Prevalence rate for aggregated ethnic groups are only marginally lower.

So over half of Caucasians "have" that CBS SNP. And if we add in the other two very common CBS SNPs which don't do anything, I'm sure we can bring that up to around 90%.

Does that mean 90% of the world have ammonia issues? Not even close. But if any random patient with sulfur intolerance or similar symptoms walks into the clinics of one of those doctors, odds are very good that they will have a CBS variant - because nearly everyone on the planet has those variants.

If these clinicians were doing research, they'd see that the healthy non-symptomatic controls have the same variants at the same rates. And to reach even their "clinical" conclusions, they are ignoring and/or contradicting both the existing research into the effects of those SNPs, as well as the known prevalence rates of those SNPs in the general population.

Blaming those SNPs for symptoms is nearly as pointless as saying that having 10 fingers causes the same symptoms. Those CBS variants don't indicate dysfunction ... they just indicate that the patient is a standard human being.
It's not the single SNP, it's the combination of that one with others forming a dynamic. Genetics is a systems science, not a singular causal one. A SNP is a factor, not a cause. Current science is predicated on a model of logic of single cause, single effect. Until a model of systems thinking becomes more dominant -- which I believe is the future of medicine -- people will continue to misunderstand genetics by trying to fit it into single cause, single effect linear thinking, which is what you're doing here. You're applying outdated logic to something that doesn't abide by it.

But also, let me remind everyone here that no science is 100%. I don't dismiss all of Yasko's research, just many of her treatment protocols. Otherwise it's like throwing out the baby with the bathwater. By pointing out potential flaws or inconsistencies or problems, you're implicitely dismissing healing protocols that have been hugely beneficial to a lot of people, myself included.

Even in the pharmaceutical world, a lot is not known, many drugs seem to work despite not fully understanding their mechanisms and having controversial theories behind them and varying interpretations. That is just the nature of medicine. We don't live in a world with 100% guarentees, and it seems like that's an unrealistic demand on this forum and possibly a reflex to simply dismiss everything and perhaps finding excuses to remain sick. There will always be a reason someone can find to dismiss something. But that's missing the point because what we're looking for here is the best possible means to health no matter how "proven" or "unproven" it is.

If I tell you that a protocol is working for me and I give my best theory as to why and back that up with valid theories made by people with valid credentials, yes there still may be flaws there. That has never not been the nature of science. So I seriously question the motivation of anyone trying to imply someone's experience is not valid because the science is imperfect. The science will always be disputed and imperfect, even when it comes to the "gold standard" of western medicine, and that's acknowledeged across the discipline. So I presume there is another motivation in doing so that's rather unsavory.

One can comment on a forum to try to help others or provide useful information, and one can comment simply to baselessly dismiss others. Why is this forum so full of the latter?