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Antibodies to ß adrenergic and muscarinic cholinergic receptors in patients with CFS

kangaSue

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I filed away this physiology model without realizing the implication of it http://www.physiologymodels.info/ans/abdominal.htm

Looking back at it, alpha1, beta2, M1 and M3 receptors are all involved with GI motility. Would it not then make sense that having any or a combination of antibodies to these receptors could seriously screw up the workings of the GI tract too?

I'm keen to know if that is the case for anyone with any of these antibodies.
 

Gingergrrl

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@kangaSue I cannot remember, have you been tested for these autoantibodies or will you be attempting to do the test via Cell Trend in Germany like I am?
 

kangaSue

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@kangaSue I cannot remember, have you been tested for these autoantibodies or will you be attempting to do the test via Cell Trend in Germany like I am?
I haven't been tested for these antibodies. Not sure what I'll do about it though as IVIG or Plasmapheresis still sounds to be the treatment options but having these antibodies are still not going to qualify me for access to that here in Australia as far as I can ascertain at this point.
 

Gingergrrl

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I haven't been tested for these antibodies. Not sure what I'll do about it though as IVIG or Plasmapheresis still sounds to be the treatment options but having these antibodies are still not going to qualify me for access to that here in Australia as far as I can ascertain at this point.
Thanks for reminding me and I was not sure. I learned from this experience that plasmapheresis is very rare in the US (and none of my doctors have ever done it or would feel comfortable with me doing it) vs. my two main doctors were absolutely okay with me trying IVIG. The insurance piece was tricky for an autoimmune diagnosis but we succeeded in getting it through.

Although I strongly suspect my insurance would reject the testing from Germany and say it is not a standardized test in the US but am pursuing it anyway for my own knowledge. I've learned from this that even if I never know what autoantibodies I have, the basic treatments are still the same (steroids, IVIG, plasmapheresis, immunosuppressants or Rituximab). Unless there are others that I do not know about? Am really hoping you can figure out a way to qualify in Australia for the treatment that you want.
 
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J.G

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I think low-dose corticosteroids are frequently used with autoimmune disease, as they suppress the immune system. They have been trialed in CFS patients by the psychobabblers with some success, though they never followed up on it and strongly advocated against their use in CFS.
Do correct me if I'm wrong. To my understanding, the role of corticosteroid feedback (or more specifically: glucocorticoid feedback) on the immune system is to stimulate a Th1/Th2-switch. As such, corticosteroids may be effective in autoimmunity characterised by inflammatory Th1 pathology. However, if adaptive immunity is pathogenic in an ME/CFS subset then I don't expect much benefit for that group. There could, of course, be subsets at play.
 
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