Poll: Legal Defense Fund would you make a $10 donation to Paypal

Would you donate $10 to PayPal

  • Yes, lets do this

    Votes: 17 47.2%
  • No, bad idea

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Yes, I would spend even more to stop this stuff

    Votes: 11 30.6%
  • No, lets spend the $$$ on research, not lawsuits

    Votes: 8 22.2%

  • Total voters
    36

Mya Symons

Mya Symons
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Even if we had just a QUARTER of the people sick with ME/CFS or similar neuro immune disorders rallying behind this or any other advocacy efforts, I would still seriously doubt our ability to make any sort of impact. At the very best this could make a small bit noise through publicity... but would that sound be audible enough for anything to change or diminish some public apathy?

In the meantime I will continue to donate a portion of my monthly SSI check to the WPI, because honestly, I believe they (and the science in general) is the best shot we've got.
I think you make a valid argument. Without the right proof, we would loose any lawsuit. There is still so much more research to be done before we can connect the dots and WPI is probably the best place to donate our money to."
 

eric_s

Senior Member
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I don't think we could sue the journals themselves because they probably have some sort of disclaimer written somewhere that states they are not responsible for verifying the content of the studies they publish.

Personally, I think the most damage has been done by the CDC and perhaps they should be the defendants.
This is just a very quick and generic answer (again), but just having a disclaimer does not necessarily protect you.
A disclaimer in the study itself seems to be more effective, to me.
There are many disclaimers and similar things that in fact don't do anything.
Like signs in restaurants that say "no liability for the wardrobe" or signs at construction site that say "parents are liable for their children", etc. Some of those don't have any effect or only a part of the effect they claim to have.
 

Mya Symons

Mya Symons
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Washington
There are many disclaimers and similar things that in fact don't do anything.
Like signs in restaurants that say "no liability for the wardrobe" or signs at construction site that say "parents are liable for their children", etc. Some of those don't have any effect or only a part of the effect they claim to have.
True. I actually sued a State Fair years ago and they had a disclaimer. We ended up settling and I received a pretty good cash settlement which I assume means they were afraid they would loose at court.
I was at a concert at the state fair and someone threw a bottle into the audience. It hit my face and I ended up getting over 400 stitches. They had security there but they were not searching anyone as they entered. They also had a sign posted which stated that they were not reponsible or liable for any injuries.
 

Levi

Senior Member
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Its been years since I practiced law, but I could come up with at least a dozen causes of action to pursue against authors and publishers of these psych lobby publications. If you do a bit of research about organizations like the Jewish Anti-Defamation League or NAACP, you will see that litigation is a very effective tool for dealing the sort of misinformation that is being fomented upon the ME/CFS community. It would be best to hire the lawyers first, and then let them guide the way in terms of what legal actions are needed.

However, since we a dealing with sick and oppressed folks that are mostly passive and un-organized, getting an effective legal response funded, up and running will be a tall order. Maybe after some additional crushing disappointments, the legal alternative will seem more attractive.


They also had a sign posted which stated that they were not reponsible or liable for any injuries.