Is thirst a thing for us ?

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My urine is always clear and I read that if you drink too much it flushed electrolytes out of your system causing your urine to be clear and that is what seem to be happening with me. I take magnesium and zinc supplements to help with my arthritis and restless legs. I dread to think how much water I drink a day but it is at least 3 litres a day.
 

heapsreal

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Yes, this "diabetes insipidus" refers to a deficiency in the hormone vasopressin (AKA anti-diuretic hormone AKA ADH). But it has nothing whatsoever to do with what people commonly refer to "diabetes".

Basically, a disturbance in the hypothalamus (HPA axis) reduces the amount of vasopressin, which results in poor retention of water in the body.

This hypothalamic dysfunction is discussed here:
https://forums.phoenixrising.me/threads/is-your-hypothalamus-up-the-creek.81181/



Excellent quote!

Simply put:
"Dysautonomia" is a general term for any dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system.

The autonomic nervous system is any part of the nervous system that controls unconscious activity in the body.

Therefore, the failure of the hypothalamus in the brain to release enough vasopressin is a form of dysautonomia.
Correct, nothing to do with diabetes mellitus.
 

heapsreal

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My urine is always clear and I read that if you drink too much it flushed electrolytes out of your system causing your urine to be clear and that is what seem to be happening with me. I take magnesium and zinc supplements to help with my arthritis and restless legs. I dread to think how much water I drink a day but it is at least 3 litres a day.
People with diabetes insipidus require lots of extra salt. Potassium id be guided by blood work as over supplementing potassium can be dangerous. They are the 2 most important electrolytes.
 

Pyrrhus

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People with diabetes insipidus require lots of extra salt. Potassium id be guided by blood work as over supplementing potassium can be dangerous. They are the 2 most important electrolytes.

Personally, I use Vitalyte for basic electrolytes, although it is expensive:
There's also Vitalyte (previously known as Gookinaid).

This was recommended by Dr. Cheney years ago and the manufacturer ran a pilot trial in ME patients that reported positive results.
https://vitalyte.com/collections/shop-vitalyte

The concentration of electrolytes in Vitalyte is identical to the concentration of electrolytes in the blood. This helps the fluid to be absorbed by the body more efficiently than plain water, thereby increasing blood volume without altering blood electrolyte concentrations. It also contains the same concentration of glucose as is found in the blood.

It has a salty, metallic taste.
 

SWAlexander

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A potential role for zinc in restless legs syndrome

Conclusion: We show for the first time that serum and brain levels of zinc are elevated in RLS. Further, we confirm the BTBD9 genetic risk factor in a new population, although the zinc changes were not significantly associated with risk genotypes. Zinc and iron homeostasis are interrelated, and zinc biology impacts neurotransmitter systems previously linked to RLS. Given the modest albeit statistically significant increase in serum zinc of ~20%, and the lack of association with two known genetic risk factors, zinc may not represent a primary etiology for the syndrome. Further investigation into the pathogenetic role that zinc may play in restless legs syndrome is needed. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33175142/
 

SWAlexander

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My urine is always clear and I read that if you drink too much it flushed electrolytes out of your system causing your urine to be clear and that is what seem to be happening with me. I take magnesium and zinc supplements to help with my arthritis and restless legs. I dread to think how much water I drink a day but it is at least 3 litres a day.
"When you drink too much water, your kidneys can't get rid of the excess water. The sodium content of your blood becomes diluted. This is called hyponatremia and it can be life-threatening. "
https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-...nd-healthy-eating/in-depth/water/art-20044256

Here is the other side:

What are the 5 electrolytes?
Sodium, calcium, potassium, chloride, phosphate, and magnesium are all electrolytes. You get them from the foods you eat and the fluids you drink. The levels of electrolytes in your body can become too low or too high.
https://medlineplus.gov/fluidandelectrolytebalance.html
 
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keepswimming

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A search brought up this thread, as I have just realised what an abnormally large amount I drink, and wondered if I was alone...

The incontinence clinic asked me to keep a record of how much I'm drinking to make sure I'm getting at least 2 litres a day.

Yesterday I drank a total of 4.5 litres :whistle: not sure what they're going to make of that!! So I guess I can add thirst to my list of symptoms!!!
 

BrightCandle

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Yep absolutely. For me the solution was a electrolytes, I needed to take them in daily and I need a substantial amount of Magnesium a day, 1.5x the dose on the packet and that is alongside the electrolyte tablets I take with water and alongside a diet that includes a lot more natural magnesium. Doing this for a months the thirst problem gradually went away
 

Zebra

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This has been a part of my illness experience for as long as I can remember. Excessive thirst, leads to excessive consumption of water, which leads to excessive urination.

Over the years I've had several urine tests rejected by laboratories, because the sample was too dilute.

Additionally, I've had several comprehensive metabolic panels reveal very slightly low sodium in the blood.

No doctor I've seen (and I've seen A LOT), has ever shown any curiosity about these symptoms or these findings, including an endocrinologist!

I am interested in exploring this further, and plan to get a blood test to check Anti-Diuretic Hormone (ADH) level, plus blood osmolality, as well as urine osmolality.

I would prefer to have this testing overseen by a knowledgeable doctor, but if that doesn't happen soon I will order it myself.

Link to ADH/Vasopressin info for anyone interested:

https://www.testing.com/tests/antidiuretic-hormone-adh/#section-6f152607-4ec6-45d5-9299-06ba2b9651d1
 

Zebra

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The incontinence clinic asked me to keep a record of how much I'm drinking to make sure I'm getting at least 2 litres a day.
Hi, @keepswimming

I have also been a patient at a urinary continence clinic, and I have also had to keep such a diary. When I showed the nurse my diary, she exclaimed: "You are drinking too much liquid, my dear!" LOL!

I'd be curious to hear what kind of feedback you get. :)
 
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Pyrrhus

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When I showed the nurse my diary, she exclaimed: "You are drinking too much liquids, my dear!"
The sad thing is that some doctors see drinking too much liquid as a psychiatric condition called "polydipsia".

I know of one ME patient who was hospitalized and the doctors intentionally withheld water from the ME patient because they said the patient was suffering from psychological polydipsia.
 
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This has been a part of my illness experience for as long as I can remember. Excessive thirst, leads to excessive consumption of water, which leads to excessive urination.
I tend to not drink alot of volume. Probably not good.

My bladder does not hold much due to cystitis or this ME crap. Ultra sound expert said my bladder was not full, when my bladder might soon rupture on his floor.

None of this got explained, in typical medical fashion, as no doctor cared to confer with me on it, nor did my insurer at the time, care to bother with me. (deny deny reject)