How do you pronounce SEID ? (Poll)

How do you pronounce SEID ?


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heapsreal

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Maybe that was the goal all along. They throw us a few bones w/ the "serious disease" "real disease" talk and think everyone will be so happy about that and getting rid of CFS. But at this point, the money needs to go to research. At least they did say that. BUT what will this criteria change do to the research and building on what is already out there ? Until there is more I say stick w/ CCC !!!!!

Yes ccc and add some biomarkers like nk function etc to help zero in on this illness, especially from a research point.
 

Sean

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Maybe that was the goal all along. They throw us a few bones w/ the "serious disease" "real disease" talk and think everyone will be so happy about that and getting rid of CFS.
We must be ready to move on when the time is right, and leave old battles behind. This is a rare opportunity for us to do so, even if imperfect (as it will always be). Otherwise we will end up caught in a mutually destructive death-spiral with the likes of Wessely & White.

A strong point for me was that the committee insisted their work be revisited within 5 years to update it. That tells me they regard this as part of a process, not just a single event, which is good in my books.

But at this point, the money needs to go to research.
Agree there. A truckload of money on the research table (and for the right projects) would help dispel any doubts about how serious they are.
 

SOC

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I was trying out various pronunciation ideas, and find that esi-eye-dee flows off the tongue quite easily (that is, saying the individual letters S-E-I-D in soft and flowing way, rather than in a staccato manner).
I think part of the problem is that it is soft and flowing. It doesn't have a serious sound. :nervous: It sounds like it should be a musical genre or a poetic figure of speech. We need some good, hard, forceful consonants in there like COPD. Because it's all about how a name sounds, isn't it? ;) (Sadly, that's probably truer than I wish it was.)
 

Forbin

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I think, in common usage, "disease" can be an assumed part of the name. "Syndrome" had to be part of CFS to distinguish it from "chronic fatigue," but I don't think there's a separate entity out there called "Systemic Exertion Intolerance." So, in common usage I think you could just use S.E.I., or some variant.

For some reason, I think "Systemic E.I." sounds good. I think it It flows better than S.E.I.D. or S.E.I.

The "systemic" part gives it gravitas, while the "E.I." part sounds to the point (like M.S. or O.I.).

Again, I would only suggest this as a possibility for common usage. I'm not talking about dropping "Disease" from the official name.


Just my take... today:).
 
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taniaaust1

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I was just thinking, it's interesting how S.L.E. is reduced to either those letters (verbally spelled out as letters like M.E.), or Lupus. None of S.E.I.D. is unique enough to do as Lupus has done... I think it is better to just say the letters as we do with C.F.S., H.I.V. etc
Cause its four letters, if one spells it.. people are going to look at you strange and think you are trying to spell the actual name of the illness rather then just the abbrev.

I cant think off my head of any medical disease abbrev in which the abrev letters are spelt out in which are over 3 letters.... they are all 2 or 3 letters.
.......

To my friend.. Ive been refering to it when I refer to the new name as "dies" ,the SEID backwards. Im also hoping the new term dont last..so for me it is now DIES. (I think I'll tell my doctor next time I see her that I now have dies).
 

taniaaust1

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DIES (backwards)
haha, so Im not the only one calling it dies.

I just posted before I saw your post that Im actually calling it dies when I talked to my friend and I think Im going to remain doing so. It's quite fitting as I dont want that name to last either.

Maybe the poll should asked, what name we are calling the new illness :) **wonders how many others are now using the word dies instead of new term?**

If the new term does become medically accepted, I think Im going to keep calling it dies to my doctors as I dont like the subliminal implication of the name.
 

taniaaust1

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I have been saying for years that a new name is the wrong goal. Our primary initial focus should be for a diagnostic test. Then we can define a new name.

Now while I expect the name to be hotly debated, I am more interested in the reasoning behind the other things, and what evidence they cite.
They got a name till more is known, that is ME. Hopefully everyone will stick to ME ... I think we need to be fighting for the definition to be made better not some watered down canadian definition.
 

CFS_for_19_years

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I think SEID sounds and looks an awful lot like SIDS, Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. Couldn't they have chosen any other name but this one?
 

Dolphin

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I'm not sure if it has been mentioned but one we should be familiar with that is spelled out is M.E. It's not "me".
 

peggy-sue

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I worry about it being pronounced "seed" - too much fodder for comedians to say; "I'm feeling a bit seedy".

Seedy (over here) means a bit shoddy or dilapidated and dirty, and possibly on the wrong side of the law.
 

CFS_for_19_years

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I'm not sure if it has been mentioned but one we should be familiar with that is spelled out is M.E. It's not "me".
I'm inclined to believe it will be spelled out, rather than spoken as one word. It would be spoken S....E...I...D, not "seid". I still hope it will not become the new name.
 
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I put the word SEID into a text document on my Mac, and activated the text-to-speech utility, and my Mac pronounced it as SEED (as in what plants come from).


I was trying out various pronunciation ideas, and find that esi-eye-dee flows off the tongue quite easily (that is, saying the individual letters S-E-I-D in soft and flowing way, rather than in a staccato manner).
I like that, Like does-eat-oats and lambs eat oats and little lambs eat ivy
(dose ee dotes n lams ee dotes)
 

Sean

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I was trying out various pronunciation ideas, and find that esi-eye-dee flows off the tongue quite easily (that is, saying the individual letters S-E-I-D in soft and flowing way, rather than in a staccato manner).
I have been trying that out for a day or so, and it is not too bad. (I am reading it as essee-eye-dee.)

Still prefer it to be one word if possible. But can live with that pronunciation if needed.
 

SOC

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I like that, Like does-eat-oats and lambs eat oats and little lambs eat ivy
(dose ee dotes n lams ee dotes)
Or the Irish Drinking Song from Whose Line Is It Anyway: Hidey -eye-dee-eye-dee-eye-dee Eye-dee-eye-dee-oh.
Or Old MacDonald's Farm: Ee-eye-ee-eye-oh

I'll take SEID over CFS any day, but trying to pronounce it is not making me happy about it. Essie Idey? Who's she? "I have SEID [seed]" Where? What kind? There just doesn't seem a good way to say it [say-id].

ETA: I'm kinda liking someone's suggestion of going both ways with it -- Systemic EID. Sounds as serious as it is and breaks up the silly singing rhythm of Essie Idey.