Dr. Jay Goldstein's Rapid Remission ME/CFS Treatments.

Thomas

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It would have been great if Dr. Goldstein filmed some of these miracles or resurrections which he wrote occurred very frequently (either daily or weekly) at his office. I have no doubt that he's telling the truth and I believe strongly in his methods, but it would be really cool to see some of these things in action.
 

Thomas

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This thread has lost some steam. Has anyone found any further Goldstein meds to be effective?

I'm close to finally getting IV lidocaine and maybe ketamine but still trying to convince a new pain clinic to do it on a slow infusion. Will find out in a week or so.
Does anyone think that if the starting dose were smaller or the lidocaine percentage were less than what Goldstein would start with them the infusion rate could be sped up? Just curious.

Also, I have the 30ml of the 2% lidocaine solution they were going to use at the first clinic that eventually rejected my request for a slow infusion. Wondering if there is any way I could convert this into a topical cream. I hear lidocaine can also be effective in treating eczema -- something that is currently flaring for me.

Thoughts? Hope everyone is well (as well as one can be with this).

@zzz @Hip @Sidereal
 

MeSci

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I'm close to finally getting IV lidocaine and maybe ketamine but still trying to convince a new pain clinic to do it on a slow infusion. Will find out in a week or so.
Does anyone think that if the starting dose were smaller or the lidocaine percentage were less than what Goldstein would start with them the infusion rate could be sped up? Just curious.
I'm not one of those addressed, but my logic suggests that it is the rate and the total amount that mattered most (i.e. not more than Dr G. recommended), as long as everything else were in the correct proportions, e.g. other ingredients, but I don't want to be responsible for giving you harmful advice! :nervous:

Put it this way: is there any danger in having too little or too slow a rate?
 

Thomas

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I'm not one of those addressed, but my logic suggests that it is the rate and the total amount that mattered most (i.e. not more than Dr G. recommended), as long as everything else were in the correct proportions, e.g. other ingredients, but I don't want to be responsible for giving you harmful advice! :nervous:

Put it this way: is there any danger in having too little or too slow a rate?
Thank you. No I was just tagging a few people at random of course I value all's advice.

The problem is I'm having a rough time convincing the clinics to do a 2 hour infusion. They do it in 30-60 mins. So I'm curious if, say for example Goldstein did 250mg of 4% lidocaine in 2 hours, could it be conceivable that half that dose and/or half the strength of the lidocaine be infused in half the time?

Also wondering if how much saline they dilute it in matters for infusion time also. I know Goldstein used 500ml. Hmmm.
 

Thomas

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If you're in Canada, you're in luck. You can buy Acetazone Forte (which is chlorzoxazone plus acetaminophen) online from Well.ca for $9.79 for 30 tablets. Acetazone Forte has 250 mg of chlorzoxazone, which is half that of Parafon Forte; you can double the dose and still stay well within the safe daily limit of acetaminophen intake. Well.ca will not ship Acetazone Forte outside of Canada, unfortunately.

The cheapest source of chlorzoxazone that I know of is NorthWestPharmacy.com, where you can get 100 tablets of generic chlorzoxazone (500 mg each) for $35.39. This is about a sixth of what online sites typically charge. However, you need a prescription at this pharmacy.
Thanks for this a while back. I can't tolerate the acetaminophen that is mixed in with the drug. And I can't get an Rx for this to use the NorthWestPharmacy site. Do you know any online sources that carry just chlorzoxazone without the added acetaminophen?
 

zzz

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Do you know any online sources that carry just chlorzoxazone without the added acetaminophen?
Although none of my favorite online pharmacies carry chlorzoxazone, you can find quite a few online pharmacies that do by Googling "buy chlorzoxazone". Most of them look genuine, though I certainly can't vouch for their reliability. The cost of chlorzoxazone from these pharmacies also tends to be almost ten times as much as the cost of the generic form from NorthWestPharmacy.com. However, if the price is not a problem, you might want to consider one of these pharmacies, since in its function of reducing the presynaptic release of glutamate, chlorzoxazone tends to be one of Dr. Goldstein's most effective medications. My experience and that of a number of other people is that it takes time to work, though, typically on the order of weeks.
 

Thomas

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Although none of my favorite online pharmacies carry chlorzoxazone, you can find quite a few online pharmacies that do by Googling "buy chlorzoxazone". Most of them look genuine, though I certainly can't vouch for their reliability. The cost of chlorzoxazone from these pharmacies also tends to be almost ten times as much as the cost of the generic form from NorthWestPharmacy.com. However, if the price is not a problem, you might want to consider one of these pharmacies, since in its function of reducing the presynaptic release of glutamate, chlorzoxazone tends to be one of Dr. Goldstein's most effective medications. My experience and that of a number of other people is that it takes time to work, though, typically on the order of weeks.
Thanks. Do you take it alone or the one combined with acetaminophen?
 

Thomas

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Anyone tried Thyrotropin Releasing Hormone? Whether by subcutaneous injection, IV, or compounded nasal spray? If not, would you? It seems to be one of Goldstein's top meds but hormones are always a little risky. He says there are minimal side effects and he tries it on everyone. Then later in TTB he says he would never use it on anyone with panic disorder or GAD until they are under control by other means. So that last part sort of turned me off since anxiety is a problem for me. But it still intrigues me as a possible med.
Thoughts?
 

Thomas

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Wouldn't it be easer to try some thyroid hormone, either T3 ot T4? I have tried T3.
Probably. But I was under the impression from reading TTB that Goldstein used TRH rather than T3 or T4 due to it's superior efficacy in treating some of the psychiatric and mood issues of neurosomatic disorders, and quicker onset of action.
Having said all that, if simply trying T3 or T4 were the same in your opinion, yes that would be easier I guess.
 

Hip

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@Thomas
Thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) appears to stimulate the release of prolactin and TSH. TSH then stimulates the release of T4, some of which is converted to T3. So on first analysis, there may be little difference between taking TRH orT3.

But according to the blurb I read just now on the peptidesciences.com site which sells TRH, there is more to it than that:
In the years 1989-1990, Dr. Walter Pierpaoli published his first relevant paper describing the amazing variety of effects of TRH in the reconstitution of the thymus - the master gland for the immune system which naturally declines during aging, and its anti-viral effects against a lethal virus.
In Dr Pierpaoli's paper on the effect of TRH on the thymus, it says:
Circadian, continued treatment with melatonin during the dark cycle produces changes in the blood level of thyroid hormones in aging mice. Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) antagonize the involution of the thymus produced by prednisolone. This effect of TRH does not seem thyroid dependent. TRH restores antibody production in non-responder athymic nude mice but does not exert this effect in neonatally thymectomized mice. Moreover, this activity does not correlate with thyroxine levels. TRH exerts a powerful protective effect in mice challenged with encephalomyocarditis (EMC) virus. Presumably pineal melatonin exerts its varied regulatory functions via hypothalamic TRH.
Note: involution = shrinking in size of an organ with age.

There appear to be lots of YouTube videos by Walter Pierpaoli.
 

Thomas

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Thanks @Hip for the additional info.
I may order some and make a nasal spray out of it the way Goldstein outlines his recipe for it in TTB. He says IV is more effective but that's a whole other pain that I don't have the energy to deal with getting.

Things that currently interest me to try other than the IV lidocaine and ketamine which still may happen, are: TRH, Tolcapone, Pentazocine, chlorzoxazone, and d-cycloserine.
 

MeSci

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Probably. But I was under the impression from reading TTB that Goldstein used TRH rather than T3 or T4 due to it's superior efficacy in treating some of the psychiatric and mood issues of neurosomatic disorders, and quicker onset of action.
Having said all that, if simply trying T3 or T4 were the same in your opinion, yes that would be easier I guess.
I've only just noticed the term 'neurosomatic' despite it cropping up several times in this thread. When I did an internet search for it, I found a lot of quacky-looking sites talking about massage. Not sure whether the massage people hijacked it from Dr Goldstein or vice versa. I hope it was the former!
 

MeSci

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In Dr Pierpaoli's paper on the effect of TRH on the thymus, it says:
Circadian, continued treatment with melatonin during the dark cycle produces changes in the blood level of thyroid hormones in aging mice. Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) antagonize the involution of the thymus produced by prednisolone. This effect of TRH does not seem thyroid dependent. TRH restores antibody production in non-responder athymic nude mice but does not exert this effect in neonatally thymectomized mice. Moreover, this activity does not correlate with thyroxine levels. TRH exerts a powerful protective effect in mice challenged with encephalomyocarditis (EMC) virus. Presumably pineal melatonin exerts its varied regulatory functions via hypothalamic TRH.
Note: involution = shrinking in size of an organ with age.

There appear to be lots of YouTube videos by Walter Pierpaoli.

Note: involution = shrinking in size of an organ with age.

There appear to be lots of YouTube videos by Walter Pierpaoli.
I expect you're bored of hearing this, but studies on mice are unlikely to tell us anything about humans.