Anyone here have tooth problems?

Wonkmonk

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in areas of the world where the water naturally has very high levels of fluoride, such as regions of China, you find that people from those regions have an average IQ which is 7 points lower.
Too much fluoride during childhood can also permanently damage the teeth, leading to dental or bone fluorosis. That's why children's toothpastes have a lower fluoride content than for adults.

In adulthood, dental fluorosis cannot happen anymore, because the tooth is fully formed until age 8. But I'd say too much fluoride probably also has negative health effects in adulthood, so one should be careful not to swallow fluoride containing products.
 

David Jackson

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in areas of the world where the water naturally has very high levels of fluoride, such as regions of China, you find that people from those regions have an average IQ which is 7 points lower.
Interesting... and, as a diehard conspiracy theorist, I feel compelled to say: makes you wonder why they're putting it in our water supplies, doesn't it?
 

Hip

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Another meta analysis finds that IQ is only 0.45 points lower.
In this article by the Harvard School of Public Health, the refer to that meta analysis, and say:
The average loss in IQ was reported as a standardized weighted mean difference of 0.45, which would be approximately equivalent to seven IQ points for commonly used IQ scores with a standard deviation of 15.
I don't quite understand the mathematics they are using there.
 
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In this article by the Harvard School of Public Health, the refer to that meta analysis, and say:
This quote from the article gives an ominous warning,
“Fluoride seems to fit in with lead, mercury, and other poisons that cause chemical brain drain,” Grandjean says. “The effect of each toxicant may seem small, but the combined damage on a population scale can be serious, especially because the brain power of the next generation is crucial to all of us.”
It seems to be obvious that giving children a toothpaste and telling them not to swallow it, when we make it sweet and minty, would be a bad idea. :cautious:
 
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I use a mixture of purified water, bicarbonate of soda, and tri sodium phosphate (6 Tbl to 2 teasp) to rinse my teeth after brushing with home made tooth powder.
I began developing Periodontal Disease and within just a few years I was in fear of losing teeth, even though I was diligent with their care. My gums were bleeding badly and my lower incisors on one side were very loose and about to come out. The Dentist had informed me that this was incurable and would progress to tooth loss once it started, that it could only be slowed and would require painful root planing.

I remembered a relative of mine who was a Doctor, not Dentist, telling me about using baking soda and salt to brush. I researched this online and began brushing this way. In about three years the bleeding had almost completely stopped and my teeth were no longer loose. Much of the bleeding stopped sooner, but that most severe area didn't.

I WaterPic my teeth regularly now, I prefer that to flossing, and I rarely see any blood.

After this success, I'm quite curious about the TSP. How quickly did you notice whitening? I haven't had much success from Oral Probiotics, in terms of whitening, only sunlight has been noticeably effective.

As soon as I'm cured I'll start surfing so my teeth look prettier, but in the mean time? o_O
 
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I lost five of my upper molars and one bicuspid over the last 10 years of illness.
I have lost enough bone that I would have to get bone grafts to have implants.
I never connected the dots and thought it was because of being ill.
Please keep taking care of the ones you have, this has been one of the worst things I have gone through in my life.
Hard to look in the mirror, or smile in pictures and public.
 

Hip

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ME/CFS aside, I personally can vouch for the connection between eating sugar-containing confectionery, snacks, soft drinks and tea or coffee, and tooth decay: when I was around 25, I started getting interested in health and fitness, and I conscientiously gave up sugar in my tea or coffee, switched to diet versions of any soft drinks I drank (rather than the sugar-containing versions), and cut down on confectionery, and bought diet versions of sweets if available.

So my sugar consumption was drastically reduced, especially by cutting out sugar in tea or coffee, as I used to have around 10 cups of tea or coffee during a working day, each with two teaspoons of sugar. So my teeth were literally bathed in sugar all day long.

Prior to giving up sugar at around the age of 25, each time I visited the dentist, often a new tooth cavity would be found, requiring a brand new filling. However, in the decades after giving up sugar at age 25, I never once had any more new cavities and fillings (sometimes an old filling would need to be replaced, but there were no new cavities to fill). Not a single new filling.

So that's my anecdote about the link between sugar and dental cavities. And studies have found that the degree of sugar intake correlates with the amount of dental caries.

Sugar causes dental decay because bacteria in your month break down the sugar into acid, thus lowering the pH in the mouth. When the pH goes below a certain point (called the critical pH), then the tooth enamel starts to demineralize (ie, dissolve away).

Whereas when the oral pH is above the critical pH, then the tooth enamel remineralizes (builds up the thickness of the enamel).

I think artificially sweeteners are much healthier for teeth.
 
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frederic83

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I read a study a long time ago, it was a study in the 70's, they fed-tubed some mice with sugar and they still had cavities. So I guess the pH in the mouth is not the only factor.
 
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In the US: somehow your mouth, a body part, gets delegated to a dentist. The doctor asks me what the dentist said. Merry Go Round. So a huge health issue in the US is lack of dental care until its late, and teeth/gums are ruined.
So every night my mouth swells up and my teeth are being pushed out of position, my tongue swells up and doesn't fit inside my mouth, my teeth ache, it moves around and I truly HATE THIS. So then I have dental anxiety, get panic attacks when teeth suddenly hurt.
 
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The book I was reading was saying the really fast drills the dentists use will shatter the microscopic structure of the insides of the teeth, where all the minerals are meant to flow through. This messes up those teeth and their ability to remineralize.

Makes me wonder if it's the same for biting/grinding your teeth at night, while you sleep, which someone told me I did.
My eye tooth is cracked, and has had no dental work other than braces 40 years ago. Nice
 

Moof

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So every night my mouth swells up and my teeth are being pushed out of position, my tongue swells up and doesn't fit inside my mouth
This sounds like angioedema, which can be caused by allergies or medications, or be hereditary. It's fairly easy to work out the first as a cause, as H1 antihistamines would reduce it. (Benadryl helped me when I developed it, though I'm still baffled as to what on earth caused it...it just stopped happening after a while. Who knows!)

If you take any meds at night, it's worthwhile checking whether any of them could feasibly cause it? I seem to remember that treatments for high blood pressure were on the list, but I guess hypertension's not a common problem in ME.
 
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Thanks for that suggestion, I'll check that out. And I have High BP, as well as: the other fun we are all having

What do you do when you have so many symptoms you cannot even approach 1/2 the issues because there is only a few minutes to obtain help from the doctor, herbalist, etc.
 
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There is this Japanese toothpaste that I use that claims to remineralize teeth by using the very compound found naturally in our mouth. This is the absolute most trusted toothpaste in Japan.

http://www.sangi-co.com/en/dental_products/index.html

It is not cheap, but can be purchased on eBay or Amazon.
Thanks for that! Will check it out. It sure seems like Asia is the future!! Wish I could afford some Korean snail slime!