T3 intracellular calcium and caffeine

Iritu1021

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Is there a reason why taking calcium wouldn't mostly fix this? Is it that it's not bioavailable and won't make it into the cells?

Also what about calcium channel openers versus blockers.?
What calcium channel openers do you know of?
PTH regulates calcium absorption through its effect on intestines, Vit D activation and renal tubules. So if your CaSR settings are off then you can take more calcium but you're probably not going to absorb most of it. Both T3 and lithium stimulate PTH production.
 

drob31

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Other thoughts:

I have arthritis worse in my finger joints. Although i use my fingers a lot but it's more prevelant in the last year.

Malabsorption issues when eating would cause decreased calcium....
 

drob31

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What calcium channel openers do you know of?
PTH regulates calcium absorption through its effect on intestines, Vit D activation and renal tubules. So if your CaSR settings are off then you can take more calcium but you're probably not going to absorb most of it. Both T3 and lithium stimulate PTH production.

I just googled it and saw something experimental called Bay K8644.
 

Iritu1021

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@S-VV this was my hair analysis at the time of my big crash in 2014 post T3 and stimulant treatment for fatigue and Hashimoto's thyroiditis. I have the same low lithium as you do, and as you seem my calcium situation was even much more severe than yours (although the units are different).
I do have documented low/borderline low ionized calcium but it seems to fluctuate and so does my PTH.
 

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Iritu1021

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I just googled it and saw something experimental called Bay K8644.
Other thoughts:

I have arthritis worse in my finger joints. Although i use my fingers a lot but it's more prevelant in the last year.

Malabsorption issues when eating would cause decreased calcium....
If it's a malabsorption issue than you should be able to get over it with Vit D and supplements. I don't think mine is due to malabsorption though since these supplements actually tend to make me worse (perhaps due to negative feedback on PTH). I'm pretty sure in my case it's something on the cellular level or hormonal regulation.
 

drob31

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If it's a malabsorption issue than you should be able to get over it with Vit D and supplements. I don't think mine is due to malabsorption though since these supplements actually tend to make me worse (perhaps due to negative feedback on PTH). I'm pretty sure in my case it's something on the cellular level or hormonal regulation.

Which supplements make you worse, vitamin D / calcium?

I think that for those that have the same reaction to t3, something very similar is happening.
 

Iritu1021

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I wonder what insights HTMA can bring into this. Acording to ARL

So cortisol and thyroid make calcium available. I read before that @pattysmith said that stress makes her feel better. That is exactly my experience. After a shock, not sleeping for a night, or anything that would raise cortisol/T3, I feel much better.:
Yeah, me too. I can definitely say that I've spent most of my life in two states: either "stressed" or "depressed".
 
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drob31

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By the way, as I sit here, I watch all these fasciculations occuring in my calves. Symptoms of low calcium or sodium or potassium or magnesium, etc?
 

S-VV

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Yeah, me too. I can definitely say that I've spent most of my life in two states: either "stressed" vs "depressed".
Absolutely. I've been an overachiever my whole life, and I'm either wired, or tired, but never in the healthy middle.
 

S-VV

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@S-VV this was my hair analysis at the time of my big crash in 2014 post T3 and stimulant treatment for fatigue and Hashimoto's thyroiditis. I have the same low lithium as you do, and as you seem my calcium situation was even much more severe than yours (although the units are different).
I do have documented low/borderline low ionized calcium but it seems to fluctuate and so does my PTH.
There are two ratios that may help us, according to ARL:
-Ca/K: reflects the effect thyroid hormone has at a celular level. Both yours (2014) and mine are above 30 which ARL says is hypothyroid.

-Mg/Na: Reflects adrenal activity on tissue level. We both have a level below one. Severe adrenal insufficiency says ARL.

http://www.arltma.com/Articles/RatiosDoc.htm

This seems to paint a picture of insufficient cortisol and T3. It is interesting that your 2018 ratios have improved, for example your Mg/Na has gone from below one to two.

We both are deficient in lithium (go team Li!), But I'm deficient in Iodine, where as you have too much. Could this be because you have primary hypothyroidism, ie, your not using the Iodine to make thyroid?
 

Iritu1021

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There are two ratios that may help us, according to ARL:
-Ca/K: reflects the effect thyroid hormone has at a celular level. Both yours (2014) and mine are above 30 which ARL says is hypothyroid.

-Mg/Na: Reflects adrenal activity on tissue level. We both have a level below one. Severe adrenal insufficiency says ARL.

http://www.arltma.com/Articles/RatiosDoc.htm

This seems to paint a picture of insufficient cortisol and T3. It is interesting that your 2018 ratios have improved, for example your Mg/Na has gone from below one to two.

We both are deficient in lithium (go team Li!), But I'm deficient in Iodine, where as you have too much. Could this be because you have primary hypothyroidism, ie, your not using the Iodine to make thyroid?
That is certainly one explanation - my iodine not being used up. My 2018 test is after supplementing with lithium which is why I wasn't deficient anymore. Have you ever tried lithium orotate? Or iodine? (and by the way, don't use them together, especially in high doses - that gave me a very bad reaction!)

I found this on Wikipedia page: "ACTH, which probably controls cortisol by controlling the movement of calcium into the cortisol-secreting target cells." So if that's true than abnormality of calcium transport could be responsible for "adrenal deficiency' rather than vice versa...
 

drob31

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No, it's a different set of issues. It switches me into a different "bad state".
Remember how I mentioned b6 was helpful?

I thought it was the HCL increasing stomach acid and allowing nutrient absorption. But...

B6 is necessary for hydrochloric acid (HCl) production by the stomach, and HCl in turn is necessary for calcium absorption
 
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And this is my hair analysis from this year. But my phosphorus is still low...
I believe that mitochondria are supposed to be able to stockpile calcium because calcium binds to the phosphorus molecules in the phospholipids of the mitochondrial membranes. (I would encourage you to look this up rather than take my word for it though.) I don't know if this ties into the altered phospholipid levels found in recent studies or if low phosphorus levels could be contributing to the issue? Phosphorus also helps hold calcium in the bones.

I need calcium supplements to function normally, but I have not reached a point of repletion after many months of supplementation. Serum calcium levels have always been normal. Since calcium greatly improves my energy levels, I believe it is being absorbed into the cells but the result is not sustained, and so I must take calcium periodically throughout the day. My calcium needs increase greatly when I take the fat-soluble vitamins to try to maintain bone health, as if I do not have enough calcium to maintain tissue levels and build bone. If I do not get enough calcium, I have greatly increased muscle tension/spasms (including my digestive tract), horrible cognitive function and extreme fatigue.
 

drob31

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I believe that mitochondria are supposed to be able to stockpile calcium because calcium binds to the phosphorus molecules in the phospholipids of the mitochondrial membranes. (I would encourage you to look this up rather than take my word for it though.) I don't know if this ties into the altered phospholipid levels found in recent studies or if low phosphorus levels could be contributing to the issue? Phosphorus also helps hold calcium in the bones.

I need calcium supplements to function normally, but I have not reached a point of repletion after many months of supplementation. Serum calcium levels have always been normal. Since calcium greatly improves my energy levels, I believe it is being absorbed into the cells but the result is not sustained, and so I must take calcium periodically throughout the day. My calcium needs increase greatly when I take the fat-soluble vitamins to try to maintain bone health, as if I do not have enough calcium to maintain tissue levels and build bone. If I do not get enough calcium, I have greatly increased muscle tension/spasms (including my digestive tract), horrible cognitive function and extreme fatigue.
I get the spasms in my calves, and the fatigue and cognitive dysfunction.

How much calcium do you take and how often, and what form?