Poll: Do you have Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ICC)

I fit the International Consensus Criteria (ICC) for ME

  • Yes

    Votes: 85 83.3%
  • Atypical ME

    Votes: 13 12.7%
  • No

    Votes: 4 3.9%

  • Total voters
    102

SWAlexander

Senior Member
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Palmitic acid is the first fatty acid produced during fatty acid synthesis and is the precursor to longer fatty acids."
I have overlooked this is a very clear point. Thank you.
Are you referring to hexadecanoic acid?
Excerpt:
"The Essential & Metabolic Fatty Acids Analysis (EMFA) evaluates the levels of essential and non-essential red blood cell membrane fatty acids important in metabolism and cellular function. Fatty acid imbalances can be a causative factor in a variety of chronic health conditions. The Essential and Metabolic Fatty Acids Analysis can indicate the need for fatty acid supplementation and/or dietary modification."

"When should testing for EMFAs be considered?
Dietary fat is emerging as one of the most important nutritional modifiers for overall health. There are many health implications which make measuring fatty acids vitally important. Relying on dietary recall may not be accurate since fatty acids can not only be obtained from the diet, but also created endogenously. Imbalances in fatty acids have been implicated in many clinical conditions including but not limited to:1-18
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Chronic inflammatory conditions
  • Autoimmune diseases
  • Osteoporosis
  • Cognitive decline
  • Mood disorders
  • Neurologic disease
  • Cancer
  • Diabetes
  • Eczema and Psoriasis
  • Metabolic syndrome
  • Polycystic ovary syndrome
  • Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
  • Asthma
more at: https://www.gdx.net/product/essential-metabolic-fatty-acids-analysis-nutritional-test-blood
 

Wishful

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Are you referring to hexadecanoic acid?
Yup, that's the other name for it.

I've definitely a believer in how individual fatty acids can affect our health. I'm less convinced that tests, especially serum tests, have much chance of actually leading to effective treatments. Possible, but probably not a high chance, at least with today's limited understanding of the complexity of our bodies.
 

SWAlexander

Senior Member
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Yup, that's the other name for it.

I've definitely a believer in how individual fatty acids can affect our health. I'm less convinced that tests, especially serum tests, have much chance of actually leading to effective treatments. Possible, but probably not a high chance, at least with today's limited understanding of the complexity of our bodies.
Having elevated phytanic acids did not lead to further tests, even though it was recommended by the lab.
I finally have two different diagnoses: Antiphospholipid-Syndrom and Adrenal Insufficiency. Both are inherited disorders.
Now I try to find the connection between the adrenal gland/hypothalamus/pituitary and amino acids and how it is affected by clots (Antiphospholipid-Syndrom). But, I find very little help from the medical profession on my exploratory journey when I ask for specific tests.
 
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Wishful

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Location
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But, I find very little help from the medical profession on my exploratory journey when I ask for specific tests.
I think one problem is that while a test may be available, experts who can properly interpret the results may be hard to find. I don't think that doctors in general have any better tools for finding that sort of expert than the rest of us do. Thus many (most?) doctors will be reluctant to order tests that won't be meaningful.
 
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I had a period when something in meat--I believe it was palmitic acid--made my ME symptoms worse, and this was effectively countered by supplemental carnitine. The problem stopped after a few months of extra carnitine. FWIW, I didn't have any problems with energy production, even during that sensitivity period. I'm wondering if the symptoms weren't from any mitochondrial dysfunction, but rather by the palmitic acid levels outside the mitochondria being involved in some other reactions (maybe membrane production).

I thought this was interesting: "Excess carbohydrates in the body are converted to palmitic acid. Palmitic acid is the first fatty acid produced during fatty acid synthesis and is the precursor to longer fatty acids."
Palmitic Acid also activates toll like receptor 4, so could be inflammatory.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toll-like_receptor_4