Pacing: Very interesting HealthRising article re HR and HRV monitoring and pacing - I may finally spring for an HR/HRV monitor!

junkcrap50

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Using the 'Body Battery' algorithm now that I have finally gotten it working has been eye opening in some ways. I did not truly understand the true effect that mental stress that comes from social media was having on my body until I started using it.
I'm glad you find it helpful. That's great! For me, my battery and stress is almost always too low to be useful, like <5 and >70, respectively. So how do you compare a straight week of those scores? However, on days I feel good and better than normal, I do notice that body battery is fairly reflective and shows elevated battery levels >40, but that's uncommon. My battery also increases on mornings when my sleep was good and refreshing. Almost never does my battery increase during the day, only at night. Highest my battery ever got is like low 70s. I don't use the stress meter as it seems to be too correlated to my HR, which is always high and spikes easily. Also, seems like it's too short term of a metric. Battery works better for me.
 
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I got a Polar H9 chest strap and Polar M430 watch for pacing several months ago while we were living in NC. We moved back to UT in July, and I don't even need them now. I think part of it is that I learned how to pay attention to my body better, and the other part is that we're now living in a desert where there's a lot less mold/water damage. It's funny that if I get re-exposed to a water-damaged place, my symptoms flare up again and I have to be very careful to avoid PEM, but once my body has cleared out those toxins, I can go back to normal again.

I strongly suspect that the CFS/ME community can be divided into at least two groups: post-viral, and environmental illness.
 
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hapl808

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I find the stress is correlated with HR but not the same. Sometimes HR is low (for me) but stress is high, and sometimes HR is normal but stress is low. In general mine only declines during the day, but putting my feet up and resting helps, which shows circulatory issues may be involved as well I imagine.

I also have found that sometimes battery is stuck low and often correlates to feeling terrible. And when it goes higher, my condition is usually improved. Unfortunately it still has only given me minimal information about what to DO in order to improve my condition, but it has highlighted certain things that were spiking my HR more than I realized (a really enjoyable phone call, etc).
 

Abrin

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I'm glad you find it helpful. That's great! For me, my battery and stress is almost always too low to be useful, like <5 and >70, respectively. So how do you compare a straight week of those scores? However, on days I feel good and better than normal, I do notice that body battery is fairly reflective and shows elevated battery levels >40, but that's uncommon. My battery also increases on mornings when my sleep was good and refreshing. Almost never does my battery increase during the day, only at night. Highest my battery ever got is like low 70s. I don't use the stress meter as it seems to be too correlated to my HR, which is always high and spikes easily. Also, seems like it's too short term of a metric. Battery works better for me.
This is why I also use the CorSense with the HRV app. I find the Morning Reading super helpful and just use the Body Battery as a guideline to how my day is going.
 

keepswimming

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I really want one but: its so hard for me to get computers and gizmos to work.

What is the easiest one of these HRV gizmos?

I could get behind a device that actually informs me I should not be watching any more news channels.

Or I should not read a book with a flashlight at 11:30 pm (about the only time my eyes can focus on paragraphs)
Yes wouldn't that be great. I've thought I'd love a device that just told me exactly what I can cope with on any given day!!

The watch I have is a garmin vivosmart 4 which I have found easy to use. Instead of showing HRV it shows stress levels which are calculated from HRV. I haven't tried anything else so I don't feel I'm in a position to advise what would be best for you, there are lots of suggestions on this thread :)
 

BrightCandle

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I was using a Garmin Vivoactive HR but it really didn't give me much more than heart rate because while it could monitor and alarm on high heart rates it could only do so with an exercise activity running and that limited basic functions like showing the time and burned the battery really fast, it didn't do HRV/body battery/Stress at all. It died early this week.

I figured I would just get on without one but I realised just how much I depended on that heart rate value to tell me I had spoons left in the day, it has turned out to be a critical part of pacing for me. I looked at most of the options out there and I basically came to the conclusion I was fine without the continuous alarm monitoring and would just get HR and a HRV capable watch that tracked a body battery/stress value. I ended up getting an Amazfit GTR 2e. Turns out that in the menus I found a heart rate alarm, it is fixed at 10minutes length and can't go below 100 bpm (100-150 in 10 increments) but it has the feature and that turns out to basically where I want it set anyway. I can also go about grabbing an app from the store that does this and I'll have to test more into whether that works in the background etc but it does appear to do just about most of what we want and in testing at least is fairly close in accuracy to the Garmin chest straps all be it with some gaps just due to the way the watches often loose signal.

I don't necessarily recommend it, I only just got it and need to work its quirks out (I dislike the strap and I have not found the ideal watchface yet for seeing the HR!) but was surprised to find it had alarm heart rate functionality since no reviews mentioned it at all. It sort of hits the spot cheaper in terms of what pacers are looking for as a tool. Accurate sleep tracking, a stress/body battery based on HRV and HR alarm.
 
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Not understand anything about the HRV factor I got something called honor band made by huawei, I only wanted one that you wear like a watch anyway. It took a long time to set up and make it work right, I had to get a relative to help me and it took 2 hours. I have found so far that my RHR was around 65 to 80 last night, going over 100 while standing and doing stuff, it dropped to a good number when I tried to sleep, below 60 at times.
Today though its up to about 90+ while travelling and after, and I feel noticeably burned out, so that confirms what seemed to be the case in the past. The strange thing though is I went for a short walk outside tonight while in this exhausted sort of state and it didn't go above 120, which is apparently normal.