Pacing: Very interesting HealthRising article re HR and HRV monitoring and pacing - I may finally spring for an HR/HRV monitor!

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Hi all, sorry to exhume an inactive topic, but I just found it.... :)

I've been wearing a Fitbit Charge 4 for 3 days. It gives me a lot of information I don't really need. What I do need is a simple, always-on, wrist-worn heart rate monitor that will alert me whenever my heart rate exceeds a given number. Can anyone recommend a device that does this? Does the Garmin Vivosmart 4 have this feature?

I don't trust any optical devices to give an accurate HRV measurement EXCEPT maybe the ones you wear in your ear. I trust the chest straps for that. But I'm not looking to track HRV all day, just HR.
 

xebex

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@TJ_in_UT the garmin vivosmart 4 will do this, but you'll likely have to charge it every day as it's a large battery drain. It does continuous tracking as default but it's not as accurate and won't have an alarm. You can set it to warn you (more accurate) if you are going over by setting up your heart rate zones, and then starting an activity and telling it what zone you want to "train" in. Itrain inzone 2 and aim to never go over 106bpm.

I have the same monitor and I personally find having the alarm on all day very annoying and stressful. I mainly use it to track steps, which has been most helpful for me - after a month of tracking i figured out my step baseline so now I know I have to pace my steps out through the day and not to go over it. If I plan to do an activity that I know will last longer than a couple of minutes I'll turn it on - so I use it for a short walk or I use it for cooking.
 

hapl808

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The Vivosmart has it, but it seems unreliable. I think your HR has to exceed the set zones for a period of time possibly? I do find the Stress and Body Battery (HRV) numbers to be interesting and possibly more helpful than I expected. I can see how sensitive my system is - small changes in diet or caffeine intake can affect my Body Battery, sleep, etc.
 
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@TJ_in_UT the garmin vivosmart 4 will do this, but you'll likely have to charge it every day as it's a large battery drain. It does continuous tracking as default but it's not as accurate and won't have an alarm. You can set it to warn you (more accurate) if you are going over by setting up your heart rate zones, and then starting an activity and telling it what zone you want to "train" in. Itrain inzone 2 and aim to never go over 106bpm.
I think my Fitbit is the same. I have to look at it to get my HR, or stay in "training", but I'd have to do some finagling to get the range right.

The Vivosmart has it, but it seems unreliable. I think your HR has to exceed the set zones for a period of time possibly?
Yes, that seems reasonable. I don't think a few seconds or even one minute over your AT is necessarily going to cause PEM. It depends on the shape you're in when it happens.
 

SnappingTurtle

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Along the lines of the original topic, I have two articles to share. First, this study demonstrates that formula-based approximation of aerobic threshold is inaccurate:
Heart rate thresholds to limit activity in Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome patients (Pacing)....

Second, this article discusses an alternative method of estimating aerobic threshold using DFA alpha 1 analysis of HRV:
DFA a1 and exercise intensity FAQ

If the HRV method is sound, we could get a fairly accurate maximum heart rate number for pacing with just a good chest strap HR monitor, a phone app, and a ramped workout on a treadmill/stationary bike!

Alternatively, Workwell Foundation recommends using an upper limit of morning resting HR + 15:
ME/CFS Activity Management with a Heart Rate Monitor
 
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Sorry too severe to read the thread... I get an Apple Watch 6 which that measure HRV and gives ab Alarm when changing. This is very important because I can only look at things with Ativan.

Anyone tried it? If it’s not accurate: Is there a way to connect it with polar so that it gives me an alarm?

Thank you
 

livinglighter

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My new ME/CFS specialist who states anaerobic threshold is an objective measure for pwME, recently recommended the Apple Watch for monitoring HR but also said similar cheaper models could be of use as well.
 
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Abrin

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I just wanted to check in with this thread with an update.

So, I finally got my Garmin Vivosmart 4 working body battery function working properly and using it with a combination of the Corsense has definately been interesting. I am using the Vivosmart 4 for an all day general reading and the Corsense for very accurate morning readings.

The one thing that I found rather surprising is that both device are pretty much always in overall agreement with each other.

Using the 'Body Battery' algorithm now that I have finally gotten it working has been eye opening in some ways. I did not truly understand the true effect that mental stress that comes from social media was having on my body until I started using it.

That being said that I still am happy that I only used the Corsense for many years on its own. I think that the fact it gave me an overall view when it came to pacing was the most helpful because I didn't end up bogged down in the fine details from the 'Body Battery' algorithm.

Using the both of these devices have stopped me from having hard crashes which has been life changing for me. It has been so wonderful to have not needed anyone's help to be able to go to the bathroom or to be able to feed myself. But, they haven't stopped me from being mostly housebound.
 

hapl808

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The body battery and stress levels are interesting, but I still haven't figured out why sometimes I can get the battery up to 90 and sometimes it's at 30 after a full night's sleep. Definitely mental activity (not just stress for me) seems a huge predictor, but also my supplement regimen seems to affect it but not in any way that's easily analyzed.
 

Abrin

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The body battery and stress levels are interesting, but I still haven't figured out why sometimes I can get the battery up to 90 and sometimes it's at 30 after a full night's sleep.
That has me completely baffled too! There seems to be no rhyme or reason to it. I have noticed that the percentage I have left of my body body does mostly line up with the green, yellow and red reading I get from the Corsense so it does appear that something is happening that both devices agree on. I have no idea what that thing that is happening might be though. :bang-head:
 
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Really glad you're finding it helpful @Abrin ! My garmin watch has been a game changer when it comes to managing my health too :)
I really want one but: its so hard for me to get computers and gizmos to work.

What is the easiest one of these HRV gizmos?

I could get behind a device that actually informs me I should not be watching any more news channels.

Or I should not read a book with a flashlight at 11:30 pm (about the only time my eyes can focus on paragraphs)