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Mitochondrial DNA damage in Gulf War Illness

pattismith

Senior Member
Messages
3,926
The study:

http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article/file?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0184832&type=printable

It quotes another study that says:

A Mitochondrial Etiology of Neurodegenerative Diseases: Evidence from Parkinson's Disease
  • 8 December 2008Full publication histor
    Address for correspondence: Douglas C. Wallace, Ph.D., Center for Molecular and Mitochondrial Medicine and Genetics, Hewitt Hall, room 2014, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-3490. Voice: 1-949-824-3490; fax: 1-949-824-6388. dwallace@uci.edu

    Abstract
    Evidence continues to accrue implicating mitochondrial dysfunction in the etiology of a number of neurodegenerative diseases. For example, Parkinson's disease (PD) can be induced by mitochondrial toxins, and nuclear DNA (nDNA) loci linked to PD have been associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. Although conclusions about the role of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variants in PD vary, we argue here that this is attributable to the novel genetics of the mtDNA and the fact that clinically relevant mtDNA variation encompasses ancient adaptive polymorphisms, recent deleterious mutations, and somatic mutations. An mtDNA association with PD is supported by an analysis of the Russian Tatar population which revealed that polymorphisms associated with haplogroup H mtDNAs increased PD risk (odds ratio [OR]= 2.58, P= 0.0001), whereas those associated with haplogroup UK cluster mtDNAs were protective (OR = 0.38, P= 0.003). Moreover, mtDNA sequencing revealed that PD patients with either haplogroup H or UK cluster mtDNAs can harbor additional recent variants that might further modulate PD risk. Therefore, the complexity of PD genetics may reflect the complex mitochondrial genetics.



    Please do not ask me which one is my haplogroup, you guess! :D
 

Learner1

Senior Member
Messages
6,305
Location
Pacific Northwest
The study:

http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article/file?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0184832&type=printable

It quotes another study that says:

A Mitochondrial Etiology of Neurodegenerative Diseases: Evidence from Parkinson's Disease
  • 8 December 2008Full publication histor
    Address for correspondence: Douglas C. Wallace, Ph.D., Center for Molecular and Mitochondrial Medicine and Genetics, Hewitt Hall, room 2014, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-3490. Voice: 1-949-824-3490; fax: 1-949-824-6388. dwallace@uci.edu

    Abstract
    Evidence continues to accrue implicating mitochondrial dysfunction in the etiology of a number of neurodegenerative diseases. For example, Parkinson's disease (PD) can be induced by mitochondrial toxins, and nuclear DNA (nDNA) loci linked to PD have been associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. Although conclusions about the role of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variants in PD vary, we argue here that this is attributable to the novel genetics of the mtDNA and the fact that clinically relevant mtDNA variation encompasses ancient adaptive polymorphisms, recent deleterious mutations, and somatic mutations. An mtDNA association with PD is supported by an analysis of the Russian Tatar population which revealed that polymorphisms associated with haplogroup H mtDNAs increased PD risk (odds ratio [OR]= 2.58, P= 0.0001), whereas those associated with haplogroup UK cluster mtDNAs were protective (OR = 0.38, P= 0.003). Moreover, mtDNA sequencing revealed that PD patients with either haplogroup H or UK cluster mtDNAs can harbor additional recent variants that might further modulate PD risk. Therefore, the complexity of PD genetics may reflect the complex mitochondrial genetics.



    Please do not ask me which one is my haplogroup, you guess! :D
Thanks for posting! My mom has Parkinson's and is in one of those haplogroups, too... ;)

Many diseases have damaged mtDNA...
 

Mithriel

Senior Member
Messages
690
Location
Scotland
The group working on mitochondria in ME had previously published about Parkinson's so that might be their paper. They became involved with ME out of sheer scientific curiosity! Things are moving on at last.
 

pattismith

Senior Member
Messages
3,926
However, the study about damaged mtDNA in Gulf war syndrom seems consistent with previous studies that concluded to mitochondrial damages (from toxic origin) as a probable cause for this syndrome :thumbsup:
 

Learner1

Senior Member
Messages
6,305
Location
Pacific Northwest
Evidence continues to accrue implicating mitochondrial dysfunction in the etiology of a number of neurodegenerative diseases. For example, Parkinson's disease (PD) can be induced by mitochondrial toxins, and nuclear DNA (nDNA) loci linked to PD have been associated with mitochondrial dysfunction.
I'm finding it difficult to believe that ME/CFS patients don't have mitochondrial problems.

We are exposed to so many toxins in the environment so that as we age, we can't help having been exposed to and accumulating toxins, particularly if our metabolism aren't speedy.

It may not be a big issue for some of us, but for others, I suspect its a bigger deal than many realize.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2920932/#!po=1.16279

https://www.google.com/url?q=https:...ggZMAM&usg=AFQjCNHuiDjF6g4tIcTMtkIU0fm-Oe1L_w