Machine Learning-assisted Research on CFS

Violeta

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These two most recent posts made me wonder if tryptophan is involved in the neuropathy that people attribute to B6 toxicity.

The B6 toxicity actually being that it's not being used correctly by the body due to error caused by some other deficiency, or I suppose oversupplementing.

I found this study that could indicate it is actually the tryptophan causing the neuropathy. But maybe others already know this.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2162498
Oops, I think the study I linked refers the tryptophan that was contaminated.
 

Violeta

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4) I continue working, trying to put more pieces of the puzzle together. I am currently looking at how the kynurenine pathway fits into the picture and it does. I hypothesise that the vicious cycle discussed by Dr Phair has to do with excitotoxicity and the NMDA Receptor via Quinolinic Acid. If we keep excitotoxicity in check we may stop the vicious cycle :
Quinolinic Acid! I can't believe how bad it is! So many things I have been looking into recently and it was as if I was tap dancing around it the whole time!

https://www.hindawi.com/journals/omcl/2013/104024/
 

Violeta

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B6 deficiency causes B3 deficiency.

B3 deficiency causes G6PD deficiency.

G6PD deficiency causes Vitamin C deficiency and oxalate problems.

I am still working on zinc.
Let me know if there are any errors, I will keep working on it.
I would say where the B6 deficiency comes from, but it might cause an uproar, IDK.
 

Inara

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Inara

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This article has some information about B6 being a remedy for this part of the problem.
To which article are you referring and which B6 problem do you mean?

I seem to have a B6 deficiency (while B6 accumulates in the blood and I can't supplement any). I speculate that alkaline phosphatase plays an important role because I have low AP always. I have found no solution to this problem (I take zinc and Mg and B2, so zinc and/or Mg and/or B2 deficiency is not the cause; also, my zinc and Mg and B2 levels don't influence the AP level).
 

pamojja

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(I take zinc and Mg and B2, so zinc and/or Mg and/or B2 deficiency is not the cause; also, my zinc and Mg and B2 levels don't influence the AP level).
Don't think taking any (Zc, Mg, B2) doesn't necessarily exclude the possibility of still being deficient. For example fought a very severe Mg-deficiency by gradually increasing my oral elemental Mg intake to up to 2.4 g/d (~1.6 g/d for 10 years in average). However, that aveliated very painful muscle-cramps only somewhat, and whole-blood Mg levels declined even further. Only since getting my 6th Mg-sulfate the cramps ceased completely, and whole blood increased by 3 mg/l after the 10th IV. still 2 mg/l short of normal (34-36 mg/l).

Also read somewhere that a ALP <70 could indicate a zinc deficiency. In my case confirmed with serum and whole blood zinc. However last year I increased from about 50 mg/d of zinc to 70 mg/d, along with receiving almost monthly Mg-sulfate IVs, and it was the first time I saw an ALP of 186 I/U. Decreasing zinc again, I'm back at 60 I/U.
 

Inara

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Thank you @pamojja.
Also read somewhere that a ALP <70 could indicate a zinc deficiency.
My ALP is smaller than 30, normally in its 20s. Neither Zinc, Mg or B2 influence that level. Also, Zinc and B2 levels are good, Mg could be better but it's not deficiency anymore.
I am happy for you you found a solution to your ALP problem.
 

Violeta

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To which article are you referring and which B6 problem do you mean?

I seem to have a B6 deficiency (while B6 accumulates in the blood and I can't supplement any). I speculate that alkaline phosphatase plays an important role because I have low AP always. I have found no solution to this problem (I take zinc and Mg and B2, so zinc and/or Mg and/or B2 deficiency is not the cause; also, my zinc and Mg and B2 levels don't influence the AP level).
This is the problem: "when vitamin B6 is deficient and the tryptophan pathway is disturbed, the incomplete degradation of tryptophan produces several metabolites that are neurotoxic, including one called quinolinic acid.

Quinolinic acid is a potent and self-perpetuating neurotoxin when unopposed in the brain."

This is the article:
http://www.hormonesmatter.com/reduc...zby0pOwjmUgVMZ70NYXFiYws2pMFNnincQiPeVawVe8E4
 

Gondwanaland

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This is the problem: "when vitamin B6 is deficient and the tryptophan pathway is disturbed, the incomplete degradation of tryptophan produces several metabolites that are neurotoxic, including one called quinolinic acid.
LDN fixed part of the problem for me. At least now I am tolerating magnesium again instead of eliminating it completely out within an hour via urine.
 

Violeta

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LDN fixed part of the problem for me. At least now I am tolerating magnesium again instead of eliminating it completely out within an hour via urine.
I didn't know LDN did that. Yesterday or the day before I read a thread and MacGyver said that boron helps the body hold onto magnesium, and calcium.
 

Violeta

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@mariovitali , you might like this study.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/ar...wl41GfHPP_KFKJWpLQiHXTZFY4tCNCKTygLRT7f2iLljc

Of great interest in neurotrauma and neurodegenerative disorders are the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazoleproprionic acid (AMPA)-type glutamate receptors, which are composed of a number of subunits. Normally, AMPA receptors contain a GluR2 subunit, which makes them impermeable to calcium.[9] Under certain physiological conditions and a growing number of pathological conditions, the endoplasmic reticulum rapidly manufactures special GluR2-lacking AMPA receptors that are calcium permeable, as is the case with N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors.[163] These are transported to the synaptic membrane and inserted in the active receptor site, rendering the synapse significantly more sensitive to excitatory activation. In certain circumstances, these special AMPA receptors can lead to progressive neurodegeneration over long periods of time.
 

Violeta

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I find that Boron excites the immune system too much by converting 25-OH Vit D into 1,25Dihydroxi Vit D (confirmed by lab tests).
Oh, I will look into that because I need immune system help.
I just saw boron helps with hyperinsulinism, which is interesting, because either Parkinson's or Alzheimer's involves insulin in the brain.