Is growing your own probiotic yoghurt possible?

ljimbo423

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Do you have an opinion on Rifaximin? I treated issues as yeast based at the time but it is very likely the yeast was just a component of some bacterial issue.
I missed this the first time I read your post.:) It was actually 2 courses of Rifaximin that allowed me to take high enough doses of antibiotic herbs without horrific die off symptoms.

It lowered the bacterial overgrowth enough so the die off was MUCH more tolerable. So a have a very high opinion of Rifaximin in treating bacterial overgrowth in the small intestine.

I agree that the core issue is probably a bacterial overgrowth.

Jim
 

dannybex

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Gut healing does not work, it will not fix the problems which are caused by pathogens and not caused by easily fixable methods like detailed on this and many other forums. None of the things recommended work because none of the supplements such as L-Glutamine has any effect against biofilm protected micro-organisms. When the infection is destroyed, the digestive system heals within 15 minutes WITHOUT any supplements. That should reassure anyone who has problems with L-Glutamine because it is not required for healing the gut, normal blood levels are sufficient.
@Carl,

Curious if you have any references to back up your statements, especially that the digestive tract heals within 15 minutes after an infection is destroyed?

I ask because if one is in metabolic acidosis, i.e., losing muscle just as one example, glutamine is used to dispose of ammonia. The liver stops detoxifying ammonia to save bicarbonate, and this increases the use of glutamine and the loss of glutamine via the kidneys. Hence blood levels may not be 'normal' in a lot of us. My main point though is that it can be very essential in dealing with gut and/or digestive issues.

Also, not all biofilms are bad, they also protect beneficial bacteria:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19210794

Thanks in advance. :)
 
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@Carl,

Curious if you have any references to back up your statements, especially that the digestive tract heals within 15 minutes after an infection is destroyed?

I ask because if one is in metabolic acidosis, i.e., losing muscle just as one example, glutamine is used to dispose of ammonia. The liver stops detoxifying ammonia to save bicarbonate, and this increases the use of glutamine and the loss of glutamine via the kidneys. Hence blood levels may not be 'normal' in a lot of us. My main point though is that it can be very essential in dealing with gut and/or digestive issues.

Also, not all biofilms are bad, they also protect beneficial bacteria:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19210794

Thanks in advance. :)
I think he is responding kind of generally to the wide reccomendations of using glutamine as part of a leaky gut protocols one can find on numerous blogs, wellness sites. It is true if one has bad microbes in biofilms, there will be a hard go of healing if biofilm is not dealt with directly, so in this specific context of infection, glutamine to repair and rebuild gut lining (what it is touted for on many websites) may not be as important as it seems based on reccomendations, until the biofilm issue is dealt with. That is not to say it is not a helpful supplement as you pointed out, but for different reasons, I guess?

I think he just has a certain way of expressing his findings; if you see his posts about biofilm issues, it is clear he is pretty well researched, and I find opinions like his are a kind of reaction to the wellness site blogs and memes about leaky gut, candida, etc which alot of us found are too basic and kind of missing key points when applied to more serious versions of these health issues. The 15 min gut healing thing is obvious hyperbole, and I get that once you eradicate a biofilm embedded infection you are golden. Maybe Carl believes it and he might as well because biofilms really seem to be a major roadblock to recovery in some persons who seem to always succumb to re-proliferation even after temporarily succesful treatment protocols.

I have learned bad bacteria can make symbiotic biofilm with beneficials too, so it is a complex issue.