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Get a Ringside Seat for Invest in ME’s 10th International Conference on 29 May

Sasha submitted a new blog post:

Get a Ringside Seat for Invest in ME’s 10th International Conference on 29 May

Sasha and Simon preview the attractions and tells you how you can watch it unfold ...

This Friday, 29 May sees the tenth International ME Conference put on by UK research charity Invest in ME (IiME) in London. The day-long conference will include 220 participants from 17 countries and will be attended by researchers, clinicians and patients.


The conference has grown from small beginnings to being one of the most important events on the international ME research calendar, not least because it’s preceded by a two-day, invitation-only research colloquium — now in its fifth year — where some of the world’s top ME researchers can put their minds together and make things happen.

IiME used their 2013 colloquium to gather researchers who might be interested in a UK replication of the exciting rituximab trial results seen in Norway and their initiative paid off.

A University College London team, led by Jo Cambridge and advised by Emeritus Professor Jonathan Edwards, took up the challenge to do a UK trial and IiME began a wildly successful, ongoing crowdfund for the research which has raised a spectacular £380,000 ($590,000, €530,000) so far.

So, we can expect big things. The colloquium happens behind closed doors but the conference doesn’t, and Mark Berry from Phoenix Rising will be in the audience, preparing an in-depth article about the research (his 2013 coverage is here, and 2014 here and here). He and others will be tweeting for Phoenix Rising so that you can follow the presentations live.


Professor Olav Mella (left) and Dr. Oystein Fluge

The stars of the show are likely to be Oystein Fluge and Olav Mella with the latest from Norway on the new, multi-centre rituximab trial, with Jo Cambridge reporting on B-cell profiling aimed at identifying likely responders in the forthcoming IiME UK rituximab trial.

Other highlights include John Chia on how enteroviruses might cause ME/CFS, Mady Hornig on markers of immunity and metabolism, Betsy Keller on molecular markers before and after exercise and Louis Nacul on ME/CFS population rates.

There’s also brain-immune communication, proteomics explained, an update from Down Under by Sonya Marshall-Gradisnik, and Amolak Bansal on better diagnosis. Professor Ian Charles will deliver the keynote address, on what a research park can do to solve a chronic illness.

The full programme is as follows:

08.55 Dr. Ian Gibson Conference Opens
09.05 Professor Ian Charles (Keynote Speech) Solving ME: What a Research Park Has to Offer in Resolving a Chronic Disease
09.30 Professor Mady Hornig Markers of Immunity and Metabolism in ME/CFS
10.00 Professor Jonas Bergquist Proteomics in ME/CFS
10.25 Refreshments Break
10.50 Dr. Luis Nacul Incidence and Prevalence of ME
11.15 Dr. Amolak Bansal Diagnosis and Differential Diagnosis: Combining clinic and research
11.45 Professor Sonya Marshall-Gradisnik, Dr Don Staines (To be confirmed) Update from National Centre for Neuroimmunology and Emerging Diseases - NCNED
12.15 IiME Projects Student Researchers: The Next Generation
12.40 Lunch
13.40 Dr. Jo Cambridge B-cell biology and ME/CFS
14.05 Dr. Neil Harrison Immune-Brain Communication and Relationship to Inflammation
14.30 Dr. John Chia ME and Chronic Enterovirus Infection: An Update on pathogenesis.
14.55 Dr. Claire Hutchinson Biomarkers for ME: Visual Processing and ME/CFS
15.20 Refreshments break
15.50 Professor Betsy Keller Molecular markers before/after exercise /Activity guidelines to avoid symptom flares
16.15 Dr. Oystein Fluge, Professor Olav Mella Multi-centre Rituximab Clinical Trial for ME/CFS
17.10 Plenary Will ME Be Treatable/Cured?
17.30 Dr. Ian Gibson Adjourn

Until 31 May you can get an ‘early bird’ price on Invest in ME’s DVD of the conference, which will be released in July.

And, of course, feel free to donate to IiME’s research! They have a general biomedical research fund, a rituximab trial fund, and a fund for a study on the gut, looking at the microbiome and gut-wall permeability (‘leaky gut’).

This is a small charity that punches well above its weight and is well worth supporting.

So, we’ve got something to look forward to on Friday — and don't forget to tune in for Phoenix Rising's live tweeting from the ringside.

Let’s hope for a conference to remember!



Phoenix Rising is a registered 501 c.(3) non profit. We support ME/CFS and NEID patients through rigorous reporting, reliable information, effective advocacy and the provision of online services which empower patients and help them to cope with their isolation.

There are many ways you can help Phoenix Rising to continue its work. If you feel able to offer your time and talent, we could really use some more authors, proof-readers, fundraisers, technicians etc. We’d also love to expand our Board of Directors. So, if you think you can help in any way then please contact Mark through the Forums.

And don’t forget: you can always support our efforts at no cost to yourself as you shop online! To find out more, visit Phoenix Rising’s Donate page by clicking the button below.

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Comments

Rest well tonight everyone. It's gonna be a hectic day tomorrow, keeping up with tweets, forum threads, hopefully lots of exciting news and perhaps even hints about unpublished research outcomes!
 
This is great... I've just come across this, so I thought if slip it in this thread...

It's for UK residents.

You can donate clothes & accessories to benefit Invest in ME. (Invest in ME get £200 for every ton of clothes/accessories donated.)

I'm always wondering what to do with unwanted clothes - because I can't get to charity shops at the moment, and it's always a hassle to carry a big bag of clothes into town anyway. (Not that I have an extensive wardrobe, but I don't like throwing old clothes into the bin.)

This company will provide you with a bag and then collect your clothes by courier, via appointment, direct from your home or work.

Seems like a great scheme.

This is Invest in ME's page:
http://www.clothesforcharity.org.uk/charities/donate/invest-in-me/

And general info on the scheme can be found on the homepage:
http://www.clothesforcharity.org.uk


Edit: it's rightly been pointed out to me that £200 per ton of clothes isn't a massively beneficial deal. It's better than nothing, but it's not a huge amount. So if u have excellent quality or expensive items to get rid of then it might be wise to try to sell them on eBay, or find other ways to sell them. I was thinking along the lines of using the service for clothes that I would otherwise throw out or take to a charity shop.
I think this is great, thanks for posting about it.
 
45 minutes till happy hour. Nearing my bedtime too :sluggish:

Best wishes to all attendees especially patients. Take good care of yourselves, keep hydrated and fed. Looking forward to good news.
 
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Does anyone have the power to tweet back?!

I want to know what is meant by the tweet about Mady Hornig's talk: 'NIH - planning a new microbiome/immune profiling study'.

Who? What?
 
Does anyone have the power to tweet back?!

I want to know what is meant by the tweet about Mady Hornig's talk: 'NIH - planning a new microbiome/immune profiling study'.

Who? What?
Hornig was talking about up and coming research she, and her co-researchers, are going to be involved in -- so it would appear it is being funded by the NIH.
 
On the other hand, it suggests there's something worth waiting for that's soon going to be published... but yes, the suspense!
How does it usually go with the later release of embargoed info? Are they waiting for journal publication? Waiting for more analysis to be done? How long does it usually take?
 
Discussing interesting embargoed information -- sorry can't tweet about it.
This was tweeted just before the end of Mady Hornig's talk.
Rats! I hate it when they do that. I can't stand the suspense.
When stuff is embargoed at a conference, it's usually fine to tweet what's embargoed eg a metabalome study (my guess in this case), without giving any results.

Btw, can easily be a year between conference presentation and paper publication, that was certainly the case with the Drs Hornig/Lipkin cytokine study.
 
How does it usually go with the later release of embargoed info? Are they waiting for journal publication? Waiting for more analysis to be done? How long does it usually take?
I suppose that's a 'how long is a piece of string' question. Definitely as long as six months (but could be sooner).

Any advance on six months? [Edited - see above!]
 
How does it usually go with the later release of embargoed info? Are they waiting for journal publication? Waiting for more analysis to be done? How long does it usually take?
It usually means that they've completed their study, and have the results, and are going through the publication process. Unfortunately that usually takes anything from a few months to a year to be completed. But I suppose it might just mean that they've got some preliminary results that they aren't ready to share publicly, and haven't even submitted them for publication yet.

Edit: ah, I see this has already been answered. crossed posts.
 
Until 31 May you can get an ‘early bird’ price on Invest in ME’s DVD of the conference, which will be released in July.
Ordered, but am looking forward to whatever summaries and info we can get beforehand.