Calcified Manganese in the Pineal Gland

Wishful

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There might be some scientific concepts in the OP, but they aren't applied in a scientific manner. Saying that the iron to manganese ratio might be part of the problem is a scientific hypothesis, and can be supported or refuted by statistics and experimentation. Claiming that 'Iron to manganese is a stand-in for gravity to electricity. It’s how the body locates itself in time.' has no scientific rationale behind it. 'Iron is, in effect, gravity in physical form.' is what I would consider pure fantasy; it lacks any explanation for how an energy field (or warpage of spacetime) can take form of an atom, nor why specifically iron.

Sorry, but as presented, I can't take anything in the OP seriously. If alethea wants to repost it with scientific explanations for her claims, I'd be willing to reconsider.

I didn't post a reply after first reading it, because my fingers were speechless. :jaw-drop:
 
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Oh, and didn't take anything as an insult. :) People are right to be skeptical. I'm not a doctor; I'm just an English major who got sick. But the doctors were unable to help me, so I had to learn to help myself.

@Learner1 , here's another article. This one talks about iron taking the place of manganese in MnSOD, depending on the relative gradients of each. I think the opposite might also be true, and manganese could take the place of iron in FeSOD. The former could play a role in ALS, and the latter in Parkinson's. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1633718/

One of the supplements that helped me for a while was alpha ketoglutaric acid (AKG). AKG gets used up by high ammonia, and my ammonia (orotic acid on organic acids test) was sky-high. When I was buying AKG on Amazon, I noticed how many of the customer reviews were written by people who had ALS. (And, actually, in addition to neuropathy and muscle weakness, I also had fasciculations.)

I started to wonder if people with ALS might also have high ammonia. And, if ALS results, at least in part, from a skewed iron to manganese ratio (i.e. a relative manganese deficiency) that leads to iron taking the place of manganese in MnSOD and perturbing its function, they would indeed have high ammonia. Manganese is one of the things mops up ammonia (via arginase activity).
 
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There are two different mechanisms at work. Perception and calibration. You can perceive yourself as being in the right time signature, but be cycling time at the wrong speed. Or you can perceive yourself as being in the wrong time signature, but be cycling time at the right speed.

If you are cycling time at the speed of the past (too quickly), but your body perceives you as being in the present, it’s Parkinson’s. If you are cycling time at the speed of the future (too slowly), but your body perceives you as being in the present, it’s ALS. These are errors in calibration.

There can also be errors in perception. If you are cycling time at the proper speed, but your body misperceives you as being in the past, it’s Alzheimer’s. If you are cycling time at the proper speed, but your body misperceives you as being in the future, it’s ME/CFS.

This is why I speak of calcified manganese (in the case of ME) or calcified iron (in the case of Alzheimer’s) in the pineal gland. The pineal gland is where I believe temporal location (the perception by the body of itself in time) takes place. Anil Seth discusses proprioception very succinctly and elegantly here:
 
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Anil Seth is not some quack with missing teeth making a YouTube video. He is a professor of cognitive and computational neuroscience at the University of Sussex. The above is a TED Talk -- an official TED Talk, not even TEDx. ;) Here is its thumbnail:

"Right now, billions of neurons in your brain are working together to generate a conscious experience -- and not just any conscious experience, your experience of the world around you and of yourself within it. How does this happen? According to neuroscientist Anil Seth, we're all hallucinating all the time; when we agree about our hallucinations, we call it "reality." Join Seth for a delightfully disorienting talk that may leave you questioning the very nature of your existence."

Here is Anil Seth: http://www.anilseth.com

I do not fully understand what's going on here. I'm just trying to figure it out. Let's put our heads together. Help me. :)
 
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@Wishful Speechless fingers! Love it.

These are just ideas. This is speculative writing, not science. The magazine piece that I'm submitting (that I've given you all a preview of - the Google doc link in the OP) is being submitted as an op-ed. I also would like to see the ideas supported or refuted by statistics and experimentation. That's why I'm putting them out there.
 

Learner1

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@Learner1 , here's another article. This one talks about iron taking the place of manganese in MnSOD, depending on the relative gradients of each. I think the opposite might also be true, and manganese could take the place of iron in FeSOD. The former could play a role in ALS, and the latter in Parkinson's. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1633718/

One of the supplements that helped me for a while was alpha ketoglutaric acid (AKG). AKG gets used up by high ammonia, and my ammonia (orotic acid on organic acids test) was sky-high. When I was buying AKG on Amazon, I noticed
The issue I've run into is high iron and lack of MN (and MN-SOD2 leading to high peroxynitrites) have led to mitochondrial membrane damage, causing lower ATP production. Ammonia is ok, but good tip.;)


If you are cycling time at the speed of the past (too quickly), but your body perceives you as being in the present, it’s Parkinson’s.
Parkinson's is caused by die off of cells in the substantial nigra that handle dopamine. Toxicity and genetics are factors.

If you are to publish, I encourage you to base your writings in well-researched facts. Then, even if controversial, it will be better received.;)
 

Wishful

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Ah, speculative writing: that makes a big difference. Supporting or refuting the ideas is kind of difficult though, since you haven't provided a basis for support. You state 'We are also light—consciousness—and we follow light’s rules.' without any reasoning for why or in which way we are electromagnetic radiation. We emit some EM radiation, since we have charges moving when our neurons fire, but so does a lamp cord, and there's no reason to expect that it is conscious.

One definite error in your understanding: 'pH is the powers of hydrogen (think the sun)—the power of light.' I assume you read the google definition: 'pH stands for power of hydrogen,' without reading the rest of the definition: ' which is a measurement of the hydrogen ion concentration in the body.' pH is not the power of light, or the sun; it is a measurement of hydrogen ion concentration in a fluid.

Another misunderstanding: 'All illness is quantum because our existence, at base, is quantum.' Yes, everything in the universe (multiverse?) can be examined at the quantum mechanics level, but that doesn't mean that quantum effects are noticeable in larger systems (beyond the microscopic level). If you study a single atom, speed and position are important. If you study a mountain, quantum effects are immeasurably small, and can be ignored. Quantum fluctuations might affect the firing of a single neuron very slightly, if you had ultra-sensitive research equipment, but they aren't likely to have a noticeable effect on them in general life. Nor would they cause the gut to leak, or bacteria to multiply noticeable faster or slower, or cause genes to activate or not activate differently. It's all a matter of scale.

I can't support or refute the claim that 'Iron is, in effect, gravity in physical form.' because it doesn't make sense. Why should gravitational energy appear as iron atoms, completely against our understanding of particle physics? Why iron, and not yttrium or fluorine? You really need a bit more explanation there.

Other parts of your post I'm not even going to try to comment on. My examples here show the hazard of speculating on very limited knowledge of science. You'd be taken more seriously if you displayed a deeper understanding of the concepts you're using for speculation.
 
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@Learner1 : What you say about the substantia nigra is a description of WHAT happens with Parkinson's. Not a description of WHY. Parkinson's patients are told to avoid manganese. Something to think about. :)

@Wishful : I hear you. Nonetheless, I don't think anything I say here is going to sway you; my whole approach is intuitive, and you seem to want empirical. But intuitive thinking does have a place. Before Aristotle provided evidence of the spherical shape of the earth, Pythagoras postulated it.

I'm no Pythagoras, obviously. :lol: It is with no false humility that I say I can barely do third-grade math. My dad (Fischer) wrote a formula that won the Nobel Prize, true, but that skill died with him in 1995. I'm just making a point about the power and the value of the imagination.

Why iron? Because of its magnetic properties. Because it is the most abundant ferromagnetic element in the body.

Why do I associate the powers of hydrogen with the power of light? Because hydrogen is what the sun is made of.

We will not be able to prove or disprove these theories here. They are seeds, and I am sowing them. But we can examine things through a more practical lens: Has anyone else had substantial improvement from iodine / salt / lithium / P5P? The iodine (10,000 mcg iodine with 40 mcg selenium) in particular was a game-changer for me.
 

Learner1

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What you say about the substantia nigra is a description of WHAT happens with Parkinson's. Not a description of WHY. Parkinson's patients are told to avoid manganese. Something to think about. :)
It's more complex than you're making out.
I've thought about it lot, and read many research papers as well.

My mother has had Parkinson's for 17 years. I am well aware of the the theories. She has has huge heavy metal toxicity. Mitochondrial dysfunction, particularly low complex 1, ROS from complexes II and III and depleted glutathione and impaired methylation can all be part of the story. As can gut dysbiosis, vagal nerve involvement, bacterial translocation, etc.

Yes, manganese and iron can be pieces, too. But its not that simple.
 
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@Learner1 : I'm so sorry to hear about your mom. My aunt has PD, so I know (to a lesser degree) how painful it can be.

We don't actually know if it's that simple, because we do not yet understand the core etiology of Parkinson's. Maybe it really IS something simple. In fact, we should consider simple explanations before we consider more complicated ones.

In spite of all our magnificent advancements, in so many fields, we still do not understand the core etiologies of Parkinson's, ALS, cancer, Alzheimer's, MS, ME/CFS ... the list goes on and on. It almost makes you wonder if we've been looking at disease through the wrong lenses.

What if all illness is quantum?
 

sb4

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@alethea I think that quantum mechanics will play a massive role in understanding health going forward, and I definitely think there is and could be merit in things like sun-gazing, calcium-magnesium, etc; but the problem is, this post is just stating what you think with minimal how or why so of course people are going to be very skeptical. It would be better if you could elucidate the details much more.

@Wishful With regards to the sun being hydrogen thing, look at the absorbtion spectrum of hydrogen and of sun light, they are very similar. https://i.stack.imgur.com/yTUFf.png https://www.harding.edu/lmurray/113_files/html/c_light and telescopes/sld008.htm
I know there is some dispute over sun and black body radation but I don't understand yet.

Also with regards to living systems operating on the quantum level, and good number of researches believe this to be true (Jim Alkahlili, JohnJoe McFadden, Mae Wan Ho, Shrodinger) to name just the ones I know. What I mean is, when you are discussing thermodynamics you are talking millions of molecules and what they are doing on average on a macro scale. Living systems aren't like this. You are talking cells that contain singular or small amounts of molecules operating in an incredibly organised fashion opon very small time scales. Even think about DNA, how is it that one strand of dna in a cell, can be copied with the incredible accuracy that it is whilst being explained by thermodynamics? I don't know.

It has been shown already that birds for example can navigate the earth using the earths magnetic fields to create a triplet state of ROS (???) which is very sensitive to magnetic fields, and this informs there positioning. Other animals can smell things from great distances away by smelling one atom (I forget what quantum mechanics is used here). Chlorophyll apparently use superposition when sending the exciton from sunlight hitting magnesium to reach the correrct place 100% of the time. Mitochondria and enzymes use quantum tunneling.

I personally think that our current understanding of how living systems operate is very elementary and that understanding how cells use quantum effects will take us great strides forward but the science is still very early and this is just my opinion.
 
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@sb4 : All very interesting. Thank you.

From what I understand -- and I am not a quantum physicist, just a girl who studies quantum physics and sometimes stalks quantum physicists in an attempt to get them to read her zany health theories -- the Holographic Principle does away with such distinctions as large- vs. small-scale, living- vs. non-living. It does so because its foundational principle is that literally everything in the universe (large and small, living and inanimate) is a "projection" of sorts. It's a wild thought, but believe it or not, it's widely accepted among contemporary physicists. It's just that we have not really considered our own bodies as quantum entities as yet. But if the holographic principle holds true, our bodies would be part of it, too. More here if you're interested:

(Michael Talbot: Holographic Universe)

(Thin Sheet of Reality: The Universe as Hologram)

(David Tong: Quantum Fields: The Real Building Blocks of the Universe)

(Leonard Susskind: Is the Universe a Hologram?)

(Klee Irwin: Quantum Gravity Theory)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pIJHJzDQcRM (It’s Time to Wake Up - We Are All One)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VqULEE7eY8M&t=5s (Kent Forbes: The Simulation Hypothesis)
 
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In other words:

If the universe is a hologram ...

then we are holograms, too. Maybe the world -- this world -- is Maya (illusion), after all.
 

keenly

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Agreed. Or too much beta-carotene? My serum feritin was over 600 and iron saturation almost 80% due to hemochromatosis (genetic iron overload), but my skin was normal in color.

I think there is something to this manganese and iron ratio. I've been repeatedly depleted in manganese which can be a problem in making SOD2 to defang the superoxide radicals my complex II is churning out.

This article discusses manganese, iron and oxidative stress...

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3340200/
I recently had dome blood work done via European Laboratory of Nutrients. My manganese is really low.

If you have Iron issue you need to check our Morley Robbins work.
 

keenly

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@pamojja From the POV of the future, today's iron to manganese ratio will be perceived (by the body) as iron-toxic. My friend Heather with severe ME/CFS has what I believe to be a kind of "phantom" iron toxicity to such a degree that her skin has bronzed.

Similarly, from the POV of the present, the future's iron to manganese ratio will be perceived (by the doctors, the tests, anything that is not the body itself) as iron-deficient. We must consider the POV of who is doing the observing and the measuring.

The iron to manganese ratio of time itself is constantly shifting toward manganese as we move outward from the center of gravity. Time is changing. Einstein's first job in that Berlin patent office was actually trying to figure out how to calibrate train schedules. He was, in a sense, already wrestling with time variability.

My symptoms got SO MUCH WORSE after a six-hour cross-country flight. Why? Because I had moved backward in time. My body (unbeknownst me me) was full of oxalate. Oxalate that should have been light. I was so acidic that sharp pains were zinging through my body like electricity.

Iron toxicity or iron deficiency have implications for the body's rate of metabolism and seem to correlate (in my experience) with either acidosis or alkalosis, respectively.

nnEMF is a bigger issue than oxalate. Airports are horrific. When 5G hits people will be dropping like flies. Literally.
 
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@keenly If this hypothesis is correct, and the iron to manganese ratio is critical to health, then simultaneously adding iron to the food supply (all bread and pasta in the US post WWII has been "enriched" with iron) while simultaneously leaching out manganese through the use of glyphosate is an almost diabolically ingenious recipe for illness of every stripe.
 
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@Learner1 Morley Robbins is a friend, and has been extremely prescient re the importance of iron. His protocol does not address oxalates, however, and did not work for me -- with the exception of boron (a little) and iodine (a lot). More than magnesium, I find I need salt; the two seem to have opposite effects in the adrenals in my case.