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Brian Walitt’s Radical Bias: Disorders of Subjective Perception, ME/CFS as Normal Life Experience?

Woolie

Senior Member
Messages
3,263
I dont know where this fits in but Leorey N. Saligan Principal Investigator Symptom Management Branch/Division of Intramural Research Beyond pain in fibromyalgia: insights into the symptom of fatigue

Gives insight on NIH's research and analysis in this area.
Hmmm, interesting, @Ecoclimber. It seems to be a sympathetic piece, and there are a couple of drug studies mentioned that might be relevant to people with ME. But still all the usual confusion of cause and effect stuff, like in interpreting correlations between fatigue and mood. The article doesn't limit itself to psychobabble explanations and approaches, but it does give them a heck of a lot of coverage.
 

Asa

Senior Member
Messages
179
Two thoughts... First -- Since the spotlight on Walitt, my mind reads NIH as the National Institute of Hoo-doo...

And second -- though I'm not up to being up to speed -- I'm asking myself: If (the psychosomatic experience that is) Walitt didn't exist, what other flags might we see with this study?
 
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Asa

Senior Member
Messages
179

Valentijn

Senior Member
Messages
15,786
I dont know where this fits in but Leorey N. Saligan Principal Investigator Symptom Management Branch/Division of Intramural Research Beyond pain in fibromyalgia: insights into the symptom of fatigue
"Furthermore, he is investigating the relationship of fatigue with other behavioral symptoms including pain, sleep, depression, anxiety, and catastrophizing."
I've updated his paragraph at http://forums.phoenixrising.me/inde...the-upcoming-post-infectious-nih-study.43223/ to include those sources.
It seems to be a sympathetic piece, and there are a couple of drug studies mentioned that might be relevant to people with ME. But still all the usual confusion of cause and effect stuff, like in interpreting correlations between fatigue and mood. The article doesn't limit itself to psychobabble explanations and approaches, but it does give them a heck of a lot of coverage.
Yeah, the review of the other studies seemed pretty good. But treatment recommendations focused almost entirely on psychosocial factors. Not the worst BPS paper I've seen, but it reflects a pretty problematic mindset for a biomedical investigation.
 

Kati

Patient in training
Messages
5,497
Yeah, the review of the other studies seemed pretty good. But treatment recommendations focused almost entirely on psychosocial factors. Not the worst BPS paper I've seen, but it reflects a pretty problematic mindset for a biomedical investigation.

I am a registered nurse so I can comment on what nurses do and what nurses research. The BPS and behavior (example, early post-surgical ambulation improves outcome) is something that nurse can act upon. Pharmacological interventions (ie, drug clinical trial) is more the job of drs though nurses will be involved in many level in drug trials, but it is more about making sure patient meets eligibility, and will serve more as care coordinator during trials.

One exception/ on example for independant nurses research on biological side would be the management of wounds.
 
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Snow Leopard

Hibernating
Messages
5,902
Location
South Australia
Same facial expressions. Sigh. (it's not all bad though)

Prevalence of Fibromyalgia in Elderly Women - Brian Walitt poster presentation.

Most predictive of Fibromyalgia later was having related symptoms 17 years earlier.
 

Invisible Woman

Senior Member
Messages
1,267
Sheeesh! Insightful!
  • If you had symptoms before - you will still have 'em (really?)

  • If you only had some symptoms before (but not all) you will still have those plus a few others (surprise!)

  • more likely to be in lower socioeconomic classes - ( yeah, cause the wealthier ones can afford to find/switch doctors 'till they find someone to help with at least some symptoms. They are more likely to be able to afford lifestyle changes and supplements that will help.)

  • the more elderly less likely to seek medical help - ( yeah 'cause they expect aches and pains. A 30 year old does not expect to be inconstant pain and the demands of a 30yo vs 80 yo lifestyle means that the younger patient really needs to get it sorted out 'cause they have a job & kids etc.)
Sorry about the extra bullet points- was trying to break up the text a little.
 
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