best dog breed for a CFS patient

hmnr asg

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Hi everyone,
So since my CFS got bad enough that I had to stop going out my fiancee got me a cat. Unfortunately as much as I love this cat she is not a cuddly one and every time I try to pet her she will scratch me pretty bad. I have tried every training method to get her to stop being so mean but even the vet thinks she is not a cuddly cat.

Of course I love my cat to death and I dont hold this against her. But I was thinking I really like to have a companion during the day while my partner is at work. Preferably one that wont try to scratch my eyes out.

So we were thinking of getting a dog. But the criteria is that the dog has to get along with a very territorial and aggressive cat and also be able to handle not being walked while my partner is at work (I can at most take her downstairs for a pee/poop).

Does anyone have any ideas?

thank you!
 
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I just love Ebony, my cavoodle, who lives with me in Sydney. A “cavoodle” is a poodle x Cavalier King Charles spaniel cross. She happily lies on my bed beside me or snuggles up onto my legs when I’m sitting up. She has a yard outside to run around in and only gets to go for a walk once or twice a week when a friend takes her.

The problem would be how a gentle, sweet natured dog would get on with your cat. I doubt if such a dog would be able to stand up to your cat and I think the cat might make the dogs life miserable. Would you be able to rehome the cat and then get a dog?

Cavoodles are very expensive in Australia. Not sure about other countries. A Cavalier King Charles Spaniel would also have all the right attributes for you.
 

lenora

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Hello Wendy....I don't know how many of you are aware of an illness called Syringomyelia (SM). SM is now known to fall under the heading of one of the folid acid shortages, and its cure is simple. Addition of 'B' Vitamins to the mother's diet.

Oddly enough more is known about it in Cavalier King Charles Spaniels' than in people. The usual, just like ME. Apparently when this particular breed was bred for man, the skull was too small for the spinal cord. Thus SM which led into another problem called Arnold-Chiari-Malformation (ACM). Apparently it can be very painful for these dogs to be petted on the skull, one of the reasons they sit up so bolt-upright. Oddly enough a lot is being printed about the illnesses in the dogs but, like ME, we're still being left out in the cold. Yes, the dogs can have surgery, but it's a pretty expensive matter. I should add that it's been a long time since I looked into this (at least 10 yrs.+)...perhaps it's been bred out of them, I don't know. They're a beautiful dog, so well-behaved and I can see that anyone would want one. Just a warning on two fronts, though. Check them out carefully as I don't think you'd want to buy even more trouble. There have been fundraisers for them, I know, but we humans languish with a pretty large problem and we can't seem to get funding that we don't raise ourselves. Don't ask me how, but I've manged to have 3 well known, "unknown" illnesses. It hasn't been much fun. Yours, Lenora.
 

hmnr asg

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I just love Ebony, my cavoodle, who lives with me in Sydney. A “cavoodle” is a poodle x Cavalier King Charles spaniel cross. She happily lies on my bed beside me or snuggles up onto my legs when I’m sitting up. She has a yard outside to run around in and only gets to go for a walk once or twice a week when a friend takes her.

The problem would be how a gentle, sweet natured dog would get on with your cat. I doubt if such a dog would be able to stand up to your cat and I think the cat might make the dogs life miserable. Would you be able to rehome the cat and then get a dog?

Cavoodles are very expensive in Australia. Not sure about other countries. A Cavalier King Charles Spaniel would also have all the right attributes for you.
Thank you @WendyM for the response. I really like Cavalier King Charles Spaniels. I will look into cavoodles.
Rehoming the cat is unfortunately not an option. Since the first day I saw her I decided I will take care of her till the end. She is like me, we are both imperfect, i am always tired and she is always angry :D

We dont have to get a dog and if I come to the conclusion that a dog wont be happy with our cat I will just give up the idea. She comes first :)
 

Diwi9

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There are breed specific attributes that can be generalized, but the temperament and interests of specific dogs is much more important than breed alone when dealing with cats. Any breed with a high prey-instinct is more likely to be a problem for cats (terriers and sight hounds being the most obvious).

My recommendation would be to work with a shelter or a very knowledgeable breeder that can temperament test a dog before you try to house one with a cat. Some dogs, despite breed, can surprisingly care less about co-existing with a cat.

Confident cats can get on quite well with dogs, but a skittish cat that runs from a dog will almost always trigger the chase instinct at some point. Your kitty sounds like it may be good at setting boundaries.

It is admirable that you are so concerned about your kitty's welfare in finding a dog that can co-exist. An unhappy kitty can cause much more stress in your life if the kitty doesn't feel safe getting to the litter box because a dog is intimidating it.

The most chill dog I've ever had around cats was a Shar Pei cross. I once had a Pit Bull cross I rescued and had to surrender back because the prey drive was so strong that it put my kitties in danger--an incredible dog, but could not safely live with cats. Also, any dog that is prone to resource guard you may also work hard to make sure your cat cannot get near to you...so a confident dog (vs. anxious dog) is also a good sign for co-existence.
 

hmnr asg

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There are breed specific attributes that can be generalized, but the temperament and interests of specific dogs is much more important than breed alone when dealing with cats. Any breed with a high prey-instinct is more likely to be a problem for cats (terriers and sight hounds being the most obvious).

My recommendation would be to work with a shelter or a very knowledgeable breeder that can temperament test a dog before you try to house one with a cat. Some dogs, despite breed, can surprisingly care less about co-existing with a cat.

Confident cats can get on quite well with dogs, but a skittish cat that runs from a dog will almost always trigger the chase instinct at some point. Your kitty sounds like it may be good at setting boundaries.

It is admirable that you are so concerned about your kitty's welfare in finding a dog that can co-exist. An unhappy kitty can cause much more stress in your life if the kitty doesn't feel safe getting to the litter box because a dog is intimidating it.

The most chill dog I've ever had around cats was a Shar Pei cross. I once had a Pit Bull cross I rescued and had to surrender back because the prey drive was so strong that it put my kitties in danger--an incredible dog, but could not safely live with cats. Also, any dog that is prone to resource guard you may also work hard to make sure your cat cannot get near to you...so a confident dog (vs. anxious dog) is also a good sign for co-existence.
Thank you for that thorough response. I don’t know much about dogs and I think your suggestion is great to work with a dog shelter to see what they think. I have no attachment to any specific breed, I just want a dog that will get along with my cat and myself.

As for my cat, you are right , she is very confident and maybe a bit too much. She never runs away from strangers and in fact anyone who sits on her couch ends up getting attacked. I hope as she gets older she gets a bit more chill ( she is one year old now and she was separated from her mom at two weeks old unfortunately).
we found her in a box outside the Salvation Army when she was two weeks old and she would not stop howling.
She was so helpless in the beginning and now she is the undisputed queen of this house !
 

Diwi9

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Oh my...bless you for taking that little girl in! She may be a sassy pants, but it is her home and hopefully she'll cozy up a bit in time. I've found that kitties start to chill out around 6 years of age.

When I brought my Shar Pei cross home from the rescue, one of my cats required him to stay in the living room and kitchen for three days...would not allow him to pass. She dictated the relationship. They were buddies after that "warm" welcome.

Some shelters now hire animal behaviorists to temperament test their dogs. It's worth calling around and finding a good shelter if you go that route. Such organizations want a secure placement. They can also help determine a lower energy dog. I have big dogs now (~100 lbs.). They have their energy moments, but sleep most of the day. While I admire the Border Collie and would love to train one in agility, ME makes this breed unsuitable for me until we find a fix for ME. I hope you can find a fit and will share with the forum if you do (tag me if so!).
 

hmnr asg

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So we have six more years before she calms down :xpem:
I have been reading about introducing cats to cats and dogs to cats and it seems to be an elaborate process.

I also am a big fan of the border collie. I hope they find a cure for this damn disease so one day we can have our dream dogs and go on runs with them!

thanks for your reply.
 

AnnieT

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My elderly friend has a chihuahua and he is glued to her side, and such a cute fun character. She puts a puppy pad at the door that he uses to toilet if she can't take him out. He is so small he can tire himself from running and playing in the house.
 

AnnieT

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I have had 3 large rescue dogs over the past 10 years, sighthounds, and I do struggle with crashes when husband is at work. Even to be pestered in a good natured way sometimes feels too much, and preparation of food etc. Dog care comes first , spending from my energy bank. We just have one greyhound now, she is gorgeous, but young and bouncy!
 
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I don't know much about particular breeds, but sometimes when you're looking for a dog who is a bit more relaxed and low-energy it makes sense to go with an older dog who doesn't have that puppy energy and craziness.
 

hmnr asg

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I don't know much about particular breeds, but sometimes when you're looking for a dog who is a bit more relaxed and low-energy it makes sense to go with an older dog who doesn't have that puppy energy and craziness.
I agree, I was going to go to a local shelter and maybe consider an adult chihuahua as @AnnieT mentioned. My only fear is that my cat will bully the dog. But we will talk to them and see what happens. And for sure I will let everyone know!

thank you all!