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Anyone else a walking storm detector?

Violeta

Senior Member
Messages
2,726
I shared my thought on cellular swelling on twitter with @mariovitali and he did a run to find concepts related to it.
My thought: "Pressure change would affect someone with swelling at the cellular level. Low cellular energy production causes cellular swelling."

1690833531443.png
 
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lenora

Senior Member
Messages
4,692
Thanks to both you and Mariovitali. I blew up the info, and my spinal cord didn't feel like it also blowing up. (One of my illnesses is cysts forming inside the spinal cord......not as uncommon as it was first thought when the MRI was first used). Very painful nonetheless. Yours, Lenora
 

Violeta

Senior Member
Messages
2,726
Thanks to both you and Mariovitali. I blew up the info, and my spinal cord didn't feel like it also blowing up. (One of my illnesses is cysts forming inside the spinal cord......not as uncommon as it was first thought when the MRI was first used). Very painful nonetheless. Yours, Lenora
@lenora, I can't believe how much you've been through, and you still give so much kindness.
 

Inca

Senior Member
Messages
278
I have swollen fingers today we have had heavy rain all day. my little fingers are permanently bent now, so I can't touch type like I was trained at Business school many years ago...as long as I can keep gaming as its one of my few pleasures left when I have the energy. There are adaptive controllers. Sony is bringing a new one out in time for xmas. I believe xbox has an adaptive controller and seen someone using it with a switch ...but I'll wait and see what the next nintendo console is like ..if its backwards compatible with all the games I already have and bit more accessible I would consider that.

Hopefully my hands won't be so bad by this winter. I think I saw some special gloves once meant for arthritis sufferers to keep their hands warmer in winter but can't remember where or what they were called now! ..damn brain! :(
 

lenora

Senior Member
Messages
4,692
Hi @Inca......a small suggestion only. Dr. Leonard's Catalog often has products for sick people. I'm sure it's online. I have very cold hands also and always have those wood mittens (mittens are supposed to be warmer than gloves) around. I'm sitting on a pair right now! Some have a little cap that you can pull over the ends of your fingertips....they're a really big help.

If you can't find them via the catalog, then look on Amazon. I know exactly what you mean. I found a windfall many years ago at Target and Walmart in the after-Xmas sales. Still, I have to admit that my fingers aren't
exactly toasty.

If this helps you or someone else, then I'm happy. Are you getting around at all these days? I hope so. Yours, Lenora
 

Nord Wolf

The Northman
Messages
538
Location
New England
I too seem to always react to weather fronts, and have for years. The more clouds, the damper it is, the more rain we get = increased symptoms. Interestingly, and oddly, I looked at the sea level in inches pressure for the last month and found every day was 29. something %. No matter sun or storm, each day was between 29% and 30%. Not much pressure fluctuation there, and yet still my symptoms flair with weather fronts.
Has anyone else checked their actual barometric pressure history in comparison to their symptom fluctuations?
 

Violeta

Senior Member
Messages
2,726
I too seem to always react to weather fronts, and have for years. The more clouds, the damper it is, the more rain we get = increased symptoms. Interestingly, and oddly, I looked at the sea level in inches pressure for the last month and found every day was 29. something %. No matter sun or storm, each day was between 29% and 30%. Not much pressure fluctuation there, and yet still my symptoms flair with weather fronts.
Has anyone else checked their actual barometric pressure history in comparison to their symptom fluctuations?
I have been watching barometric pressure and it does have an effect on my symptom fluctuation.

Barometric pressure numbers do not vary very much. See how the pressure changed by only .08 PPSI as this low pressure moves in.

1691158714161.png

What I have found most interesting is that I made a big change in my diet about a week ago and it's not affecting me so severely. I had been feeling that there was a crushing weight on my chest and whole body weakness. I stopped eating starch except for a small amount of oats and added in more beef.
 

Nord Wolf

The Northman
Messages
538
Location
New England
What I have found most interesting is that I made a big change in my diet about a week ago and it's not affecting me so severely. I had been feeling that there was a crushing weight on my chest and whole body weakness. I stopped eating starch except for a small amount of oats and added in more beef.
Good for you! I'm no grains at all and allergic to beef.
Yes, it is amazing at how little the atmospheric pressure shifts, and yet how much that affects us. It is quite the finite relation between cell pressure and atmospheric pressure systems.
I hope the dietary shift continues to supply you with beneficial changes in connection with weather systems.
 

Nord Wolf

The Northman
Messages
538
Location
New England
But could it be the humidity and not the barometric pressure?
Quite possible. I don't do great in humidity. The more humid it is, the worse I feel, typically. That narrow span of time in early-mid spring when the temps are mild, the sun is shining, and the humidity is very low, I usually feel better than much of the rest of the year. Once the heat and humidity roll in come June, my warm season symptoms rise quickly. And then with weather pressure systems they tend to flair. My guess it is it a combo of humidity and pressure fluctuations, but also what else the air is carrying with it when heavy weather systems move overhead.
 

Violeta

Senior Member
Messages
2,726
I also have had a brief span of time in the early-mid spring, just to see it go away as summer arrives, but never could figure it out. I never considered humidity plus barometric pressure.

One thing the air is carrying with that change in pressure and increase in humidity is oxygen. One would think that's a good thing for us, but I have been reading that that's not true.
 

Violeta

Senior Member
Messages
2,726
Perhaps the ability to detect a storm has to do with being sensitive to electrical charge in the air.

Atmospheric electricity is always present, and during fine weather away from thunderstorms, the air above the surface of Earth is positively charged, while the Earth's surface charge is negative. This can be understood in terms of a difference of potential between a point of the Earth's surface, and a point somewhere in the air above it. Because the atmospheric electric field is negatively directed in fair weather, the convention is to refer to the potential gradient, which has the opposite sign and is about 100 V/m at the surface, away from thunderstorms.[5] There is a weak conduction current of atmospheric ions moving in the atmospheric electric field, about 2 picoamperes per square meter, and the air is weakly conductive due to the presence of these atmospheric ions.
 

Violeta

Senior Member
Messages
2,726
I have often found that on my worst fatigue days I usually am too tired to take a shower, but when I do force myself, I find the shower provides great relief. "Negative ions" may explain why.

How do you increase negative ions in your body?


We should very frequently expose ourselves to places with very high concentrations (tens of thousands) of negative ions such as these:
  1. mountains.
  2. parks.
  3. waterfalls/water fountains/your bathroom shower.
  4. springs.
  5. beaches/pounding surfs.
  6. forests (especially pine forests)
  7. moving air/wind.
  8. dirt/earth.
 

Nord Wolf

The Northman
Messages
538
Location
New England
@Violeta -
Pressure and humidity - yes, I think they both plat a major part in dysautonomia, M.E., PoTS, and many other health conditions. I was just unaware of how little the change in pressure actually is that can cause symptoms flairs.
Yesterday was sunny and clear. The pressure was 30% (which is pretty high for us) and humidity was 58%. Today the pressure is 29.89 and dropping, and the humidity is 95% with heavy storms and rain moving in later. I have far more grog, mental fog, full body aches and pains, and oppressed lung function today.

I often wonder how my system would do in a sunnier, arid climate like the mid-west rather than damp, cloudy New England. For instance, in Taos NM the pressure today is 30.38 and it looks like their normal pressure spans 30.25 to 30.50. And their humidity of course is always very low.

I also agree about negative ions. Luckily I live in a place usually dominated by them.
-on a mountain
-surrounded by forest
-many pines
-running streams through the property
-usually breezy and windy
-lots of house plants

Interestingly, I normally feel more energy during lightning storms. Then again, most cloud to ground lightning is negatively charged. Of course, rain creates negative ions as well, but many times when it is raining I feel drained. So, I think it has something to do with the combinations of low pressure, high humidity, and the ion overload.
 

Violeta

Senior Member
Messages
2,726
@Violeta -
Pressure and humidity - yes, I think they both plat a major part in dysautonomia, M.E., PoTS, and many other health conditions. I was just unaware of how little the change in pressure actually is that can cause symptoms flairs.
Yesterday was sunny and clear. The pressure was 30% (which is pretty high for us) and humidity was 58%. Today the pressure is 29.89 and dropping, and the humidity is 95% with heavy storms and rain moving in later. I have far more grog, mental fog, full body aches and pains, and oppressed lung function today.

I often wonder how my system would do in a sunnier, arid climate like the mid-west rather than damp, cloudy New England. For instance, in Taos NM the pressure today is 30.38 and it looks like their normal pressure spans 30.25 to 30.50. And their humidity of course is always very low.

I also agree about negative ions. Luckily I live in a place usually dominated by them.
-on a mountain
-surrounded by forest
-many pines
-running streams through the property
-usually breezy and windy
-lots of house plants

Interestingly, I normally feel more energy during lightning storms. Then again, most cloud to ground lightning is negatively charged. Of course, rain creates negative ions as well, but many times when it is raining I feel drained. So, I think it has something to do with the combinations of low pressure, high humidity, and the ion overload.
Someone suggested to me a long time ago that to take advantage of the negative ions of the rain you have to go out into the rain. I'm not usually up for that but I am going to try it when it's just sprinkling.
 
Messages
70
I too feel worse before it rains when the atmospheric pressure starts to decrease.

The atmospheric pressure drop theory in my case is also supported by the fact that I feel better at night time when pressure increases.

Obviously, there is something wrong with our cardiovascular systems which react excessively to those changes in atmospheric pressure.
 
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Nord Wolf

The Northman
Messages
538
Location
New England
Someone suggested to me a long time ago that to take advantage of the negative ions of the rain you have to go out into the rain. I'm not usually up for that but I am going to try it when it's just sprinkling.
I’m happy to report that earlier today I had enough energy to take a short stroll on our dead end dirt road. As usual, I was blind and couldn’t see and so had my trusty white cane and sturdy walking boots. About halfway the sky opened up and rain poured down. I continued on my way until I came to my turnaround point. It poured the whole way back. I was soaked to the bone and loved every step of my small journey. I felt alive. :)
 

sunshine44

Que sera sera
Messages
1,086
I’m happy to report that earlier today I had enough energy to take a short stroll on our dead end dirt road. As usual, I was blind and couldn’t see and so had my trusty white cane and sturdy walking boots. About halfway the sky opened up and rain poured down. I continued on my way until I came to my turnaround point. It poured the whole way back. I was soaked to the bone and loved every step of my small journey. I felt alive. :)

Aww, that’s very exciting and I am sure so fulfilling!
 

lenora

Senior Member
Messages
4,692
Hi Wolf & @Violeta.....Made you feel like a child again, perhaps. There is something about being in a rainfall. I love the smell of ozone and of course that accompanies storms.

Perhaps your rainy day feeling is a mild depression. It can happen. I feel better in the hot, sunny weather....but I can't say that I like it all of the time. I'm a shade person, but it causes problems. Rainy days can make me feel cozy. I hope you find a perfect place to move to. Somewhere closer to medical care. Good luck.

Oh, speaking of perfect places, I find that England is one of them. Yes, it rains but unless it's the rainy season, the showers are fast and after the first two days, I felt great. Yours, Lenora