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Cortene Peptide for MECFS? "Curative"?!

Discussion in 'Latest ME/CFS Research' started by Ema, Dec 22, 2017.

  1. Ema

    Ema Senior Member

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    I think this is the peptide that Rich from ProHealth referred to on FB earlier in the year that caused such a stir. Maybe?

    Anyone ever heard of it? Or the trial?

    http://corteneinc.com/mecfs
     
    sb4, Isaiah 58:11, Mariesak and 16 others like this.
  2. serusaert

    serusaert

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    this looks like a moon shot to me, and, imo, the theory behind it makes sense at least superficially. i am very interested to see their early phase II results when they are available.
     
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  3. Ema

    Ema Senior Member

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    The Cortene peptide normalizes calcium handling as well, according to some animal studies. I have a feeling that is part of the picture for us as well.
     
    Mary likes this.
  4. JES

    JES Senior Member

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    The above doesn't sound too different to me than how antidepressants work. Antidepressants modulate the stress response by blocking all kinds of receptors in the brain that are controlling serotonin, glutamate, norepinephrine, dopamine, etc. None of this has ever worked to treat/cure CFS/ME.
     
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  5. hixxy

    hixxy Senior Member

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    @JES Note how it says also? It's obviously a secondary function and anti-depressants don't do the primary function.
     
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  6. Ema

    Ema Senior Member

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    "CRH is at the heart of mast cell activation"

    "CRH also increases TLR-4 (a significant source of inflammation)" (would explain LDN)

    "Some studies suggest that CRH inhibits NK cell activity"

    and more. Hmmmmm.

    Selfhacked on CRH...
     
  7. Ema

    Ema Senior Member

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    What if the increased lactate is a way for the body to try to suppress CRH?

    "Whereas a physiologic action for lactate within the hypothalamus is possible, the present findings indicate that lactate is an inhibitor of CRH release."

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9933504
     
  8. MartinDH

    MartinDH Senior Member

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    I don't really get who they are. Kind of a startup? And what do they mean with "Overstimulating this receptor induces many of the symptoms of ME/CFS in healthy animals"...Which symptoms exactly? Is there a paper where I can read about this trial? I am a bit confused...

    I would be interested in what Ron's team thinks about this approach...?!
     
  9. Jesse2233

    Jesse2233 Senior Member

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    Eh why not
     
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  10. junkcrap50

    junkcrap50 Senior Member

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    Where are the results of their Phase 1 Clinical Trial? Or animal trials for that matter?
     
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  11. pattismith

    pattismith Senior Member

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    I wonder if this CRF activation could explain my low or borderline TSH, free T4 and free T3...:)
     
    Mary likes this.
  12. Ema

    Ema Senior Member

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    So you can buy hairloss products that supposedly contain this peptide, astressin-b, which is a crf2 antagonist. But this blog says it is too heavy to be absorbed through the skin. I wonder how you know if that is true? @Hip?

    This article seems to suggest it is just blocking expression in the skin? It's a total sales pitch though and it clearly didn't work all that well or it seems like we would have heard more about it since 2011.
     
    Last edited: Dec 28, 2017
  13. Ema

    Ema Senior Member

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    I received a reply today to my inquiry stating that participant recruitment would begin in March 2018 in UT under a doctor there. The trial apparently requires living in UT for a number of months.

    I have written back to ask about their earlier results and will let you know if I receive a response.
     
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  14. Hip

    Hip Senior Member

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    The 500 dalton rule is the rule of thumb for transdermal absorption: if the molecular weight is above around 500 daltons, then it won't cross the skin.
     
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  15. Ema

    Ema Senior Member

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    The MW of astressin-b is 4041.69, so just a leeetle bit heavier. Rats.
     
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  16. Hip

    Hip Senior Member

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    I read that intranasally compounds up to 2,000 daltons can be absorbed, but 4,000 daltons might be pushing it.
     
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  17. Hip

    Hip Senior Member

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    Whether this theory is correct time will tell, but the idea that the basic cause of ME/CFS is something as simple as the following hypothesis is very attractive:
    We get so bogged down in all the myriad biological and symptomatic complexities of ME/CFS, but wouldn't it be nice if the whole damm caboodle could be explained by one single point of failure, like an abnormality in the expression of this corticotropin releasing factor receptor type II (CRF2).
     
    Last edited: Dec 28, 2017
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  18. Hip

    Hip Senior Member

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    It looks like from this paper that astressin-B is a non-selective CRF1 and CRF2 antagonist, and astressin2-B is a selective CRF2 antagonist. Since we would want to target CRF2, astressin2-B would be best, but the astressin-B found in hair loss products might suffice.

    Astressin-B is found in the Spectral.F7 hair loss product, whose ingredients are:
    But as discussed above, since the molecular weight of astressin-B is 4042 daltons, and both the human skin and blood-brain barrier have a 500 dalton limit to the molecules that can cross them, getting astressin-B into the brain is a problem.

    It is possible that intranasal administration of astressin-B might work, because the intranasal route apparently bypasses the blood-brain barrier; but there is still around a 2,000 dalton limit for molecules crossing the nasal mucous membranes, so it would be a long shot if any astressin-B got through.


    There are a couple of other CRF2 receptor antagonists listed here: antisauvagine-30 and K 41498, but they both have molecular weights in the 3,600 dalton region.
     
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2017
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  19. hixxy

    hixxy Senior Member

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    It would be very nice indeed but I'm thinking that's going to be very unlikely. It seems more likely that even if this is involved it's only part of the story.
     
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  20. Hip

    Hip Senior Member

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    Indeed, but for ME/CFS patients like myself who are happy to try anything that theoretically could help, even "unlikely" seems like good odds!
     
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