Cortene Peptide for MECFS? "Curative"?!

Hip

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and what about rectal absorption?
I am not sure; absorption in the intestines is more complex. This article says that via paracellular absorption in the intestines, molecules up to 1,000 daltons can be absorbed.

This article says small amounts of proteins as large as 80,000 daltons can be absorbed in the intestines. However, the reference given in that article is this paper, and I cannot find that 80,000 figure in the paper.
 

mariovitali

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@drewmaster

Since you are a new user, i am giving you a summary of the Research i've been doing : I use Machine Learning methods to identify the most relevant biological targets responsible for ME/CFS.

In the following post, the importance of Pyruvate Dehydrogenase was suggested almost one year before Fluge and Mella :

http://forums.phoenixrising.me/inde...e-treatment-for-cfs.37244/page-65#post-679562

However, please note also how the algorithm picks up Cortisol and Norepinephrine.

Here is another post that discusses HPA Axis :

http://forums.phoenixrising.me/inde...e-treatment-for-cfs.37244/page-91#post-814452


I believe that a big part of ME/CFS is HPA Axis dysregulation however the root problem is the Liver for most of us. I posted here several patient Fibroscans suggesting Liver Fibrosis. I met one Fibro patient 10 days ago who had Liver biopsy that showed Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis (NASH).

Again, it is suggested -according to my theory- that all ME/CFS Patients take a Fibroscan test to assess Liver status.
 
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MonkeyMan

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@drewmaster

Since you are a new user, i am giving you a summary of the Research i've been doing : I use Machine Learning methods to identify the most relevant biological targets responsible for ME/CFS.

In the following post, the importance of Pyruvate Dehydrogenase was suggested almost one year before Fluge and Mella :

http://forums.phoenixrising.me/inde...e-treatment-for-cfs.37244/page-65#post-679562

However, please note also how the algorithm picks up Cortisol and Norepinephrine.

Here is another post that discusses HPA Axis :

http://forums.phoenixrising.me/inde...e-treatment-for-cfs.37244/page-91#post-814452


I believe that a big part of ME/CFS is HPA Axis dysregulation however the root problem is the Liver for most of us. I posted here several patient Fibroscans suggesting Liver Fibrosis. I met one Fibro patient 10 days ago who had Liver biopsy that showed Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis (NASH).

Again, it is suggested -according to my theory- that all ME/CFS Patients take a Fibroscan test to assess Liver status.
Thanks! Looks promising to me.
 

Countrygirl

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NOTE: I had to scroll a long way down to get to the article.


https://www.healthrising.org/blog/2...ialed-chronic-fatigue-syndrome-mecfs-soon-pt/


The Cortene Way: New Drug to Be Trialed in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) Soon – Pt. I
by Cort Johnson | Feb 8, 2018 | Homepage, Treatment | 10 comments


Research funding for chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) has been poor at best but clinical trials have elicited a wholly different degree of disappointment altogether. Few clinical trials are ever done and those are often involve alternative approaches. The 6 active clinical trials listed in clinicaltrials.gov, for instance, include treatments like acupuncture, moxibustion, oral rehydration and CoQ10.

That makes it shocking to see a “new” drug – a drug not being used in other diseases – get a clinical trial in ME/CFS. It wasn’t supposed to happen this way. First, it’s been assumed that repurposed drugs – drugs already in use in other disease – would be tested in ME/CFS to improve symptoms – and only later, as we understood the disease better, would we get to a drug that gets at the core problems in ME/CFS. This group is demolishing that timeline. They believe they have a drug that gets at the core of ME/CFS, and in the first quarter of this year they expect to test that drug.

Over the next month Health Rising will be publishing a 3 or 4-part blog series telling the story of the small group of researchers that are bringing a drug to ME/CFS they believe could get at the core of this disease.

The drug itself is highly experimental and the researchers behind it come from the biotechnology and drug development fields. They stumbled on ME/CFS by chance, but when they did the light bulbs went on. For the past year or two they’ve devoted their time to understanding ME/CFS and getting to the place where a clinical trial can take place.


Pereira was at a cocktail party discussing his drug with a well-known Stanford doctor, who was talking about some immune findings in a strange disease called ME/CFS. Pereira had not heard of the disease before, but the immune findings and ME/CFS in general seemed eerily reminiscent of the data he’d seen produced for CT38.
This is not to say that over time other medical issues haven’t shown up in some ME/CFS patients that could complicate their situation. That’s to be expected in any decades long disease. If Pereira and Cortene are right, though, the core of this disease might be amenable to a dramatic change.

Part 2 will examine Cortene’s hypothesis in greater detail and show how it explains the many symptoms and anomalies of ME/CFS. Part 3 will explain the treatment approach and provide details on the upcoming clinical trial. H(ealth Rising is not affiliated with Cortene in any manner.)
 

PinkPanda

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I don't know about this. They seem to be putting some high expectations out there..
Does anyone understand how exactly this drug will affect stress receptors in the limbic system?
I think the limbic system might currently be getting too little attention in medicine.

Still, although there is increased stress-sensitivity in ME/CFS, there is also evidence of a disrupted energy metabolism. I don't see how a drug that targets the response to stress in the limbic system would correct the low energy production.

I guess we'll have to see how it goes and if more detailed infos are put out there. I would still evaluate this carefully, how his theory fits all the issues of ME/CFS is not yet clear to me.
Until now, it only seems a theory, he doesn't seem to have any proof yet that receptors in the limbic system are even altered in ME/CFS, does he?
 

Gijs

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Very interesting theory. But i would like to know if this abnormal stress reaction is the cause or a compensation reaction i.e. for low energy (?). But it could be the core problem in a subgroup of ME patiënts.
 

Silencio

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I think you need to think of it this way..

A clinical trial will not answer all of your questions. It is a bet. Oftentimes, drug developers do not know why their drug works, they just must prove that it doesn’t harm, is safe in humans to an acceptable degree, and is effective to a degree that leads the fda to approve it.

So the good news for all of us is:
We have researchers coming at this from the bottom up like Davis, with no set theory.
We have researchers coming at it from middle out, a theory in search of a drug, like Klimas.
And now we have a new crew coming at this from the top down, a drug that will be tested and maybe will reveal new information in the process.
 

pattismith

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It looks like from this paper that astressin-B is a non-selective CRF1 and CRF2 antagonist, and astressin2-B is a selective CRF2 antagonist. Since we would want to target CRF2, astressin2-B would be best, but the astressin-B found in hair loss products might suffice.

Astressin-B is found in the Spectral.F7 hair loss product, whose ingredients are:


But as discussed above, since the molecular weight of astressin-B is 4042 daltons, and both the human skin and blood-brain barrier have a 500 dalton limit to the molecules that can cross them, getting astressin-B into the brain is a problem.

It is possible that intranasal administration of astressin-B might work, because the intranasal route apparently bypasses the blood-brain barrier; but there is still around a 2,000 dalton limit for molecules crossing the nasal mucous membranes, so it would be a long shot if any astressin-B got through.

.
Did someone try the astressin B in the nose?
I feel concerned about the risk of increased hair growth inside the nose :eek:
 
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There's a whole big write-up of Cortene now over at Health Rising.

https://www.healthrising.org/blog/2...ialed-chronic-fatigue-syndrome-mecfs-soon-pt/

I'll take a tall glass of very skeptical. Sounds like profit-oriented researchers have got a drug they don't fully understand and are willing to try it on me/cfs since we're eager to say the least.

Trying to fit a peg of unknown shape into a hole of unknown shape? Let's just say if it works it will have been a great triumph over the odds.
 

Ema

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Sounds like profit-oriented researchers have got a drug they don't fully understand and are willing to try it on me/cfs since we're eager to say the least.
I’ve spoken to one of the researchers, and I’d say that is not true. In my dealings, they have been very cautious about making claims and stressed several times that since there is no animal model to test, they have no idea how well it will work.

I agree it’s ultimately a long shot but I think the theory is sound and this is the only way to determine if it will be efficacious or not. Even if it only helped a subgroup, that would be worth it.
 

Silencio

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Sounds like profit-oriented researchers have got a drug they don't fully understand and are willing to try it on me/cfs since we're eager to say the least.
It’s a biotech company.. they will get funded or not based on how solid the science is by biotech VCs, or a larger pharma, or private investors. Biotech is a business, like any other, only maybe more risky. I’m not sure why you would ascribe these kinds of negative qualities to them.
 
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perrier

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Remember Dr Jay Goldstein. Didn't he localise issues in the brain and didn't his varied recommendations affect the limbic system.

Does anyone know anything about Mr Pereira? Where is the trial being done?

What does Dr. Ron Davis think of this? And other ME researchers?