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Zinc may hold key to fighting liver disease

Gondwanaland

Senior Member
Messages
5,092
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/06/170601124016.htm
Zinc may hold key to fighting liver disease
Date: June 1, 2017
Source: Westmead Institute for Medical Research
Summary: New research highlights the potential for zinc to be used as a simple and effective therapeutic against viral infections such as hepatitis C and influenza.

New research from the Westmead Institute's Storr Liver Centre in collaboration with the Centre for Virus Research and Kirby Institute has shown that serum zinc may benefit liver disease in a way we never expected.
 

Paralee

Senior Member
Messages
571
Location
USA
Ooooh, I like this! Some GOOD news!

Edit : And I've been looking for my DHEA and zinc and can't find them anywhere. Our house has at least two black holes!
 

Gondwanaland

Senior Member
Messages
5,092
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5383135/pdf/pnfs-22-001.pdf
Prev Nutr Food Sci. 2017 Mar; 22(1): 1–8.
Published online 2017 Mar 31. doi: 10.3746/pnf.2017.22.1.1
PMCID: PMC5383135
Zinc in Pancreatic Islet Biology, Insulin Sensitivity, and Diabetes

Abstract
About 20 chemical elements are nutritionally essential for humans with defined molecular functions. Several essential and nonessential biometals are either functional nutrients with antidiabetic actions or can be diabetogenic. A key question remains whether changes in the metabolism of biometals and biominerals are a consequence of diabetes or are involved in its etiology. Exploration of the roles of zinc (Zn) in this regard is most revealing because 80 years of scientific discoveries link zinc and diabetes. In pancreatic β- and α-cells, zinc has specific functions in the biochemistry of insulin and glucagon. When zinc ions are secreted during vesicular exocytosis, they have autocrine, paracrine, and endocrine roles. The membrane protein ZnT8 transports zinc ions into the insulin and glucagon granules. ZnT8 has a risk allele that predisposes the majority of humans to developing diabetes. In target tissues, increased availability of zinc enhances the insulin response by inhibiting protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B, which controls the phosphorylation state of the insulin receptor and hence downstream signalling. Inherited diseases of zinc metabolism, environmental exposures that interfere with the control of cellular zinc homeostasis, and nutritional or conditioned zinc deficiency influence the patho-biochemistry of diabetes. Accepting the view that zinc is one of the many factors in multiple gene-environment interactions that cause the functional demise of β-cells generates an immense potential for treating and perhaps preventing diabetes. Personalized nutrition, bioactive food, and pharmaceuticals targeting the control of cellular zinc in precision medicine are among the possible interventions.
 

Gondwanaland

Senior Member
Messages
5,092
Our thinking about how to approach metal deficiencies and overloads in diabetes is too simplistic. A lack of understanding of the consequences of genetic variability and of suitable biomarkers means that we cannot reliably determine the requirement for supplementation.

Not the underlying biochemistry but the particular interventions are at issue. Zinc supplementation may not restore control of zinc homeostasis under conditions of sustained oxidative stress. In fact, additional zinc may harm rather than benefit because it binds to proteins that are normally not targeted if control of redox homeostasis is compromised.

Restoration of proper redox homeostasis is not straightforward as redox signalling is necessary in cells, in particular in cells with specific requirements such as β-cells that rely on glucose-stimulated mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate generation for insulin release.

The risks and benefits of zinc supplementation need to be evaluated carefully with not only zinc itself in mind but also the factors that affect its proper usage in tissues (69).
 

Gondwanaland

Senior Member
Messages
5,092
One would expect it to be depleted in infection, which is not good.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28629136
Nutrients. 2017 Jun 17;9(6). pii: E624. doi: 10.3390/nu9060624.
Zinc in Infection and Inflammation.

Abstract
Micronutrient homeostasis is a key factor in maintaining a healthy immune system. Zinc is an essential micronutrient that is involved in the regulation of the innate and adaptive immune responses. The main cause of zinc deficiency is malnutrition. Zinc deficiency leads to cell-mediated immune dysfunctions among other manifestations. Consequently, such dysfunctions lead to a worse outcome in the response towards bacterial infection and sepsis. For instance, zinc is an essential component of the pathogen-eliminating signal transduction pathways leading to neutrophil extracellular traps (NET) formation, as well as inducing cell-mediated immunity over humoral immunity by regulating specific factors of differentiation. Additionally, zinc deficiency plays a role in inflammation, mainly elevating inflammatory response as well as damage to host tissue. Zinc is involved in the modulation of the proinflammatory response by targeting Nuclear Factor Kappa B (NF-κB), a transcription factor that is the master regulator of proinflammatory responses. It is also involved in controlling oxidative stress and regulating inflammatory cytokines. Zinc plays an intricate function during an immune response and its homeostasis is critical for sustaining proper immune function. This review will summarize the latest findings concerning the role of this micronutrient during the course of infections and inflammatory response and how the immune system modulates zinc depending on different stimuli.
 

Gondwanaland

Senior Member
Messages
5,092
Cofactors are important. And more is not necessarily better. It can be toxic.
http://www.acu-cell.com/znk.html
Zinc Synergists:
Magnesium, chromium, cobalt, tin, Vitamin B2,
Vitamin D, Vitamin E, [Vitamin A - small amounts].
Zinc Antagonists / Inhibitors:
Iron, calcium, phosphorus, selenium, sodium, nickel,
copper, Vitamin B1, Vitamin C, niacin / niacinamide,
folic acid, choline, lecithin, alcohol, phytic acid,
oxalic acid, [Vitamin A - large amounts].
Note:Calcium is a zinc antagonist at low, or normal
phosphorus levels. However, with high phosphorus
levels, extra calcium may be required to reduce zinc
loss by helping to lower elevated phosphorus levels.
This can also be accomplished by adding Vitamin B5.
At the same time, glutathione promoting benefits of zinc are neutralized by high levels of this mineral which are toxic, suppress the immune system and lead to the depletion of glutathione. It is quite possibly that this ability of high zinc levels to deplete glutathione is the reason why some studies with zinc lozenges showed no improvement in the supplemental groups.
The most impressive thing about Zinc I read so far is this
http://www.medicaldaily.com/zinc-deficiency-digestive-health-effects-389339
During the early stages, the piglet’s body tried to absorb zinc more efficiently at the same time reduced pancreatic zinc excretion. Researchers defined the pancreas as the “control center for food digestion and energy homeostasis in the body," an essential organ that pumps zinc into the gastrointestinal tract in order to maintain a consistent zinc level. Pancreatic zinc excretion is reduced when an organism is depleted of zinc, which is to say it's an important part of the digestive system.

"We proved that there is a direct correlation between the amount of digestive enzymes inside the pancreas and zinc levels in the organism as a whole," Brugger said in a statement. "Even short intervals of zinc deficiency in the diet should therefore be avoided.
Not to mention its role in bone/joint health, lowering ammonia/acetaldehyde, possible prevention of pancreatitis/pancreas cancer etc
@Gondwanaland which form of zinc is best?
I think it can vary a lot from person to person... I tried Zinc chelated, Zinc picolinate and Zinc citrate, the latter is my favorite so far. Picolinate IME should be taken in very low doses (below five mg) because I suspect picolinate makes it to be very rapidly absorbed, and picolinate is derived from Tryptophan, I don't think we want much of that around in our bodies causing anxiety... Also Zinc is a pro-coagulant, so the citrate balances that out nicely. I want to try Zinc Sulfate for joint health.
Some forms of Zinc are mentioned here for specific symptoms.
 

Tammy

Senior Member
Messages
2,167
Location
New Mexico
A couple of years ago I started looking into the importance of zinc and was surprised at how vital it was for so many things. I take liquid zinc sulfate pretty regularly. At the first signs of a sore throat .........or signs of a cold I increase my dosage ALOT and it has really helped.............I've been able to stop a cold in it's tracks.
 

Misfit Toy

Senior Member
Messages
4,178
Location
USA
I take zinc for Pyroluria and know it has immune action properties. I can't take the picolinate but can take the citrate. I am not sure I take enough. I take 60 mg, but it brought down my copper number!
 

Paralee

Senior Member
Messages
571
Location
USA
That's what I'm afraid of, bringing down copper, maybe zinc one day and copper the next?

I'm not sure about this but 2-3 years ago I only had about 10-20 gray hairs and my chiro couldn't believe it ('cause I'm old) and said that my zinc and copper must be in balance. I think it can probably have to do with genetics, too.

@Gondwanaland , you came through for me again, I've been thinking about zinc for me and Hubs because 1.he's a man and everything indicates it would be good and 2. I'm getting a few more gray hairs, so maybe some copper with it.
 
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Gondwanaland

Senior Member
Messages
5,092
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16684142
J Anim Physiol Anim Nutr (Berl). 2006 Jun;90(5-6):216-22.
Bioavailability of zinc glycinate in comparison with zinc sulphate in the presence of dietary phytate in an animal model with Zn labelled rats.

Abstract
The objective of this study was to quantify the bioavailability of zinc (Zn) from sulphate and glycinate as representatives of inorganic and organic zinc sources. The semi-synthetic basal diet contained 2 microg/g of native Zn and was fortified with pure sodium-phytate (8 g/kg) in order to simulate conditions of common cereal-based meals. The basal diet was supplemented with either 53 microg/g of Zn from sulphate (control) or 10 microg/g of Zn from either sulphate (ZnSulphate) or glycinate (ZnGly). Twenty-four (65)Zn-labelled, growing rats weighing 133 g were allotted to the three diets (eight animals per treatment) and were kept pair-fed to ZnSulphate for 15 days. Zn contents in blood plasma, femur and whole body, as well as, plasma alkaline phosphatase activities were reduced compared with control indicating a zinc deficiency in ZnSulphate and ZnGly treatment. This allowed their differentiation in zinc bioavailability. True absorption of dietary Zn was significantly higher in ZnGly than in ZnSulphate (51% vs. 44%) while losses of endogenous faecal Zn and urinary Zn were not affected to a quantitatively relevant extent (mean: 17% and 2% of intake). This resulted in a +30% significantly improved Zn retention for ZnGly (33% vs. 25%) and a lower severity on Zn deficiency symptoms compared with ZnSulphate. Metabolic utilization accounted for 95% of absorbed dietary Zn for both Zn sources. Overall, the bioavailability of zinc glycinate was significantly superior by 16% to zinc sulphate (49% vs. 42%), mainly because of a higher absorptive potential at presence of a strong anti-nutritive component (phytate) in the diet.