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Top scientists to meet at Cleveland Clinic on trial of XMRV

Sing

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Other Members of Our Team

Given the unscientific, politic landscape for the upcoming research, one bright note--other than truth itself--would seem to be the financial interests of the drug companies. I think they are very interested in marketing expensive anti-retrovirals to people with XAND illnesses. The WPI has been selling them live virus samples to be tested against the drug companies existing stock of drugs, and for them to start developing new ones.

So while the mistaken and retrogressive views serve those who called it wrong before, including the psychiatric lobby and the insurance companies who'd stand to lose with disability obligations, the pecuniary interests of the drug companies move things in the opposite direction. It looks like Big Pharma's on our team! Add to that public reaction, the easily ramped up fears over contaminated blood supplies, another retrovirus like HIV, and heightened cancer prospects, it looks like we have some heavy hitters on our side too.

Cecelia
 

Samuel

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Good point.

I do wonder about pharma, however. We have had antidepressants shoved down our throats for decades. They don't work and cause side effects, but doctors keep pushing them. There is also a similar situation with stimulants, and perhaps other types of drugs. Do we know that pharma played no role in the psychologization of these diseases? They would have perceived it to be in their interest.

They are welcome to join us on our terms.

But I want to know what role they played in the past, if any.
 
K

_Kim_

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Finally, there is a report about the conference at the Cleveland Clinic. It doesn't say much, but it does say scientists are excited about XMRV. Here it is:

http://www.cleveland.com/healthfit/index.ssf/2009/11/cleveland_clinic_conference_pu.html
Thanks for posting that Wildaisy. Even news like this keeps the fires of hope burning for us. I liked how Silverman mentioned the interest in XMRV in the research community and how he shared that he wasn't sending off live virus.

"Every day I'm getting e-mails from scientists wanting the virus for their studies," he said.

These people are mostly virologists looking at other viruses, or researchers looking at CFS and prostate cancer, which also has been linked to XMRV.

Silverman's lab has been trying to fill requests as quickly as possible, sending the virus DNA -- not the live virus -- by mail in a test tube. (The researcher can then insert the DNA into human cells in the lab, which makes the actual virus.)
 
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Finally, there is a report about the conference at the Cleveland Clinic. It doesn't say much, but it does say scientists are excited about XMRV. Here it is:

http://www.cleveland.com/healthfit/index.ssf/2009/11/cleveland_clinic_conference_pu.html
Thanks so much for this wildaisy. I've been so eager to hear anything about this! How exciting!

some tidbits:

The scientists who gathered in Cleveland two weeks ago to share research on the retrovirus XMRV thought they would be able to convene in relative obscurity.

They were wrong.

Interest from people who suffer from chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), and other researchers who want to study XMRV, continues to grow in the wake of the Nov. 11 meeting at the Cleveland Clinic.

"There was a lot of excitement at the meeting," Clinic cancer biologist Robert Silverman said of the gathering that drew 75 of the top scientists from 14 institutions who are studying XMRV.
.............
For nearly 10 hours, including a break for lunch, those gathered heard 17 short talks on different facets of research. A panel discussion wrapped up the day. More informal chats stretched on into dinner at Valerio's in Little Italy (the group took over the entire restaurant).

And that's all Silverman will say for now.

"We need to keep the data presented to ourselves," he said. "It's not appropriate to present unpublished, nonpeer-reviewed data to the public."

"Every day I'm getting e-mails from scientists wanting the virus for their studies," he said.

These people are mostly virologists looking at other viruses, or researchers looking at CFS and prostate cancer, which also has been linked to XMRV.

Silverman's lab has been trying to fill requests as quickly as possible, sending the virus DNA -- not the live virus -- by mail in a test tube. (The researcher can then insert the DNA into human cells in the lab, which makes the actual virus.)

In the meantime, researchers are working to develop a diagnostic test for XMRV.
islandfinn:)
 

gracenote

All shall be well . . .
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but I try to be cautious

Finally, there is a report about the conference at the Cleveland Clinic. It doesn't say much, but it does say scientists are excited about XMRV. Here it is: http://www.cleveland.com/healthfit/index.ssf/2009/11/cleveland_clinic_conference_pu.html
Thanks, Wildaisy. This is a tantalizing bit of news.

"Patients are really intrigued," said Silverman, who said he and his colleagues have heard from CFS patients across the country. "I think this is giving them hope that there could be a treatment in the future or establish a cause. But I try to be cautious [with them]."