Thyroid and glutamate connection

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and if that doesn't work I'll try modulating my NMDA receptor.
The only thing I've found that works for me re NMDA receptor is a massive daily dose of mag gly, administered in very small doses at regular intervals. Everything else I've tried bites me on the @ss and exits, laughing.

Also a loading dose of K (abt 800-900 mgs) first thing in the AM with 1/8th tspn of sea salt and a little cinnamon.

Selenomethionine went south on me almost a year ago, haven't had the courage to try it again, but will be gearing up for that as soon as I can bite another bullet.

Any additional possibilities would be gratefully received ..... and thank you for confirming your blog :):):):thumbsup:
 

Paralee

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From what I can deduce, and may be wrong, is that my adenosine overfloweth. I've also been really hesitant on taking glutamate....thinking it turns into dopamine? I can't take inosine either, though. Still waiting on dante labs to send my whole genome, hoping it will do some kind of good.
 
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will have to pay a geneticist to analyze it
@Paralee
Kids add a whole new dimension of misery to all this ....

There are several on-line sites, some of which do part, or more, of the analysis for free or a very nominal fee. I can't recall the names right now (having a bad fatigue and brain fog day), but you might try a google. Sorry to be so useless today.
 

Iritu1021

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Lamotrigine and memantine are NMDA blockers. So are tramadol and atomoxetine but they also act as SNRI/ NRI respectively.

I find that lithium orotate, even a small dose completely abolishes the positive glutamate stimulating effect I get from micro-T3.

DHEA and pregnenolone and positive allosteric modulators of NMDA. THC appears to increase glutamatergic transmission in certain parts of the brain while CBD has a protective effect against excitotoxicity. Low dose prescriptions stimulants also appear to increase glutamate (the common story I hear how people take a dose of Ritalin and feel great for a day but then pay a price for three days afterward). In such case, one should try taking it with something that lowers excitotoxicity and/or taking a lower dose.

I've long ago realized that my brain functions similar to "Alice in Wonderland" magic mushroom principle: if you bite too much from one site you "grow too big", if you bite too much from the other side you "grow too small". So it's a constant balancing act but it comes with a learning curve (I'm still learning but much less clueless than I used to be...)

 
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Iritu1021

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From what I can deduce, and may be wrong, is that my adenosine overfloweth. I've also been really hesitant on taking glutamate....thinking it turns into dopamine? I can't take inosine either, though. Still waiting on dante labs to send my whole genome, hoping it will do some kind of good.
You want to make sure you don't have overactive or upregulated 5HT2A, 5HT2C or NMDA receptors before you start raising glutamate.
 

Iritu1021

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I forgot to mention agmatine - still very new but promising and available as a supplement.

"Agmatine has been discussed as a putative neurotransmitter. It is synthesized in the brain, stored in synaptic vesicles, accumulated by uptake, released by membrane depolarization, and inactivated by agmatinase. Agmatine binds to α2-adrenergic receptor and imidazoline receptor binding sites, and blocks NMDA receptors and other cation ligand-gated channels. Short only of identifying specific ("own") post-synaptic receptors, agmatine in fact, fulfills Henry Dale's criteria for a neurotransmitter and is hence, considered a neuromodulator and co-transmitter. The existence of theoretical agmatinergic-mediated neuronal systems has not yet been demonstrated although the existence of such receptors is implied by its prominence in the mediation of both the central and peripheral nervous systems.[8] Research into agmatine-specific receptors and transmission pathways continues."
 
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I forgot to mention agmatine - still very new but promising and available as a supplement.

"Agmatine has been discussed as a putative neurotransmitter. It is synthesized in the brain, stored in synaptic vesicles, accumulated by uptake, released by membrane depolarization, and inactivated by agmatinase.
@Iritu1021
This is really interesting, and inevitably leads me down the tiring path of more endless research.

Thank you for posting it !!!