Third Annual Community Symposium on the Molecular Basis of ME/CFS Sponsored by OMF - DISCUSSION

JES

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Benzos will definitely cause a dependency and tolerance will develop, where your body will be unable to cope with a reduced dosage without tapering off slowly. I guess some people can develop addiction to them, but for me they didn't provide any "high". I think in psychiatry benzos have got an exaggerated bad reputation, which is a bit bizarre when considering what other psychiatric drugs are being prescribed to people, which have equally or more bothersome aspects.

If ativan works for some aspect of ME/CFS, I think it would be by far the most accessible, cost-efficient and probably safest treatment when compared with other potentially efficient, experimental, immuno-modulating drugs like copaxone or rituximab. I'd definitely like to know if ativan shows a response in the nanoneedle.
 
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Mary

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GABA doesn't generally cross the blood brain barrier and so doesn't seem too likely to help for sleep when taken orally.
]I've read this too, although I've also read that we have GABA receptors in our gut, so taking plain GABA may be helpful. I've also read that l-theanine DOES cross the blood-brain barrier, and will help our brains produce GABA. So I take l-theanine in addition to a cocktail of other supplements for sleep.
 

SlamDancin

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@JES Benzos are absolutely no joke and just because you didn’t get high from them doesn’t mean psychs aren’t being properly careful prescribing them. You don’t want to know what a benzo withdrawal feels like I promise. In fact one paper I’ve read and referenced here before is a medical hypothesis that benzo withdrawal could be a precipitating factor in unexplained chronic illnesses involving NO/ONOO- viscious cycles such as ME/CFS, to quote the paper.