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Study shows in some instances antibiotics improve microbiome

antares4141

Senior Member
Messages
577
Location
Truth or consequences, nm
Interesting findings from a study bill gates funded.

https://www.gatesnotes.com/About-Bi...-PF&utm_source_platform=Facebook_Desktop_Feed

Soon the doctors noticed something intriguing: The communities where children got the azithromycin seemed to have lower rates of child mortality than those where they didn’t.

To find out whether that was really true—and if so, why it was true—the foundation funded a large study involving about 200,000 children in three countries. When the results came out in 2018, we were thrilled. In places with high rates of child mortality, giving azithromycin preemptively to all children significantly improved the odds that they would survive.

Why would that be? Recently, researchers have been focusing on the idea that many birth problems start long before the baby is born and are connected to conditions in the mother’s digestive tract—especially an unhealthy gut microbiome. If the mom doesn’t have a good mix of bacteria, viruses, and other microbes, then her gut gets inflamed and can’t absorb all the nutrients she needs to stay healthy. Her baby will have the same problems, leading to malnutrition and possibly death.

The study we were so excited about revealed that the azithromycin was killing off bad bacteria in the children’s guts, reducing the inflammation and allowing their bodies to absorb essential nutrients. Based on this finding, local groups are now providing azithromycin to children under the age of one in Mali, Niger, and Nigeria, where child mortality rates are especially high. (For more on this fascinating story, see this blog post on the foundation’s site.)

After that study was finished, we turned to the next set of questions: Is it possible to reach kids earlier, before they’re born? Would it help both the baby and the mom to treat her while she’s in labor? What about before she goes into labor, in the second and third trimesters? Two studies involving tens of thousands of women in Africa and South Asia just concluded this year. The findings haven’t been published yet, but I’m optimistic that they’ll show significant gains for mothers and babies.
 

hapl808

Senior Member
Messages
2,178
Interesting. Zithro is the first antibiotic I took after the initial onset. It was 10 years later, but it gave me almost immediate remission. Unfortunately it only lasted for a few days.

I've always felt there's a huge gut connection with all of this, but probably a gut connection with almost everything.
 

BrightCandle

Senior Member
Messages
1,161
What they really need to do is before and after microbiome analysis to work out what its removing and promoting. There is a decent chance that removing some critically important bad bacteria is also coming at the cost of some mighty important good ones that will only show up as the people get older. Antibiotics are probably the reason most developed nation people do not have L Reuteri regulating their small intestine leading to fungal and other infections of the small intestine, but its not something that is going to show up quickly.

We underestimate the dangers of antibiotics quite a bit because the consequences are very long term. Our microbiomes looking nothing like those who have never taken antibiotics and that is almost certainly very bad,
 

Alvin2

The good news is patients don't die the bad news..
Messages
3,045
What they really need to do is before and after microbiome analysis to work out what its removing and promoting. There is a decent chance that removing some critically important bad bacteria is also coming at the cost of some mighty important good ones that will only show up as the people get older.
+1
 

Hip

Senior Member
Messages
17,962
Azithromycin has been shown beneficial for ME/CFS in a very small scale study. This benefit may come from its anti-inflammatory effects in the brain.

When I took azithromycin 500 mg daily for a few days, I noticed perhaps increased energy and mental clarity.

Oddly though, I found that although azithromycin may have improved energy and brain fog slightly while taking it, I found it slightly harder to get into a stand-back perspective, ie, a mental overview of the tasks I am doing.

I could focus on tasks, but when I took a moment to reflect on what I was doing, I found it harder to get a mental overview.
 

Alvin2

The good news is patients don't die the bad news..
Messages
3,045
Oddly though, I found that although azithromycin may have improved energy and brain fog slightly while taking it, I found it slightly harder to get into a stand-back perspective, ie, a mental overview of the tasks I am doing.

I could focus on tasks, but when I took a moment to reflect on what I was doing, I found it harder to get a mental overview.
I know what you mean, i can sometimes spit out a long monologue but i still can't analyze what i am doing or organize thoughts.
 
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