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Study: Antioxidant use may promote spread of cancer.

barbc56

Senior Member
Messages
3,657
Several studies have recently shown antioxidants can promote metastasis in cancer.
The study, researchers said, echoes some other study results showing cancer patients' tumors actually grew while being treated with antioxidants
This study is limited by the fact that this research was done on mice. However, because of the results of this study as well as previous research with similar findings, I would think a study with humans would now be considered unethical. See below. Bolding is mine.
"The idea that antioxidants are good for you has been so strong that there have been clinical trials done in which cancer patients were administered antioxidants," added Dr. Morrison, who is also a CPRIT Scholar in Cancer Research and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator. "Some of those trials had to be stopped because the patients getting the antioxidants were dying faster. Our data suggest the reason for this: cancer cells benefit more from antioxidants than normal cells do."
http://www.upi.com/Health_News/2015...e-may-promote-spread-of-cancer/2051445022723/

The complete study is behind a paywall which for me, leaves some questions unanswered. If anyone has access to the full version, it would be helpful.

While the title mentions the use of pro oxidents may be beneficial against cancer, from what I can find it looks like this is only inferred from the study. I also could not get a sense if antioxidants in food would have the same effect as supplements. Supplements are an easier way to consume higher doses of antioxidants as well as metabolized differently. But does that make a difference?

Unfortunately, cancer cells start developing before it's discovered and some of these people may be taking high doses of antioxidant supplements.

Barb
 

GhostGum

Senior Member
Messages
316
Location
Vic, AU
I really do not like the generalising in these kinds of articles, the lack of specific information is terrible journalism and leads one to believe its more fear mongering towards supplements, which we see all the time. Antioxidants is just such a broad term and the mechanisms and activity of different 'antioxidants' is clearly not going to be the same.

My understanding in this study it relates to NAC (n-acetyl cysteine)? Saw this story a few days ago and think that is what it said.

Edit: Just adding a comment I found relating to NAC and this study.

The study is flawed and highly dubious if the tests were based on NAC as the antioxidant.

First - its manmade and its absorption compared to natural Cysteine is questionable.
Second - Cysteine can oxidise into 'Cystine' and other sulphites which are bad for us, causing oxidisative stress symptoms, especially w/o proper SUOX (sulfite oxidase) functionality via a good molybdenum/copper balance.
Third - Selenium IS the anti-oxidant for Cysteine used through Thioredoxin Reductase cycles to anti-oxidise Cystine/Sulfites back into Cysteine, which is FAR more important than just taking MORE Cysteine. Selenium also improves your thyroid and metabolism and therefore weightloss and energy levels.
 
Last edited:

barbc56

Senior Member
Messages
3,657
@GhostGum

I agree. The press often overgeneralizes topics. But we are talking about many studies.

As far as the quotes by the authors of the study, who are researchers, that doesn't mean the quotes aren't cherry picked and why, as I stated above, I would really like to see the full study.

You make a good point and I'll try to find some other sources, if possible.

Barb

ETA Just saw your edit. Do you have a citation for the source? Thanks.
 

IreneF

Senior Member
Messages
1,552
Location
San Francisco

barbc56

Senior Member
Messages
3,657
What I've read over the years has convinced me that it's far better to get your micronutrients, including antioxidants, in the form of food. Fresh food, minimally processed, and lots of different kinds.

I take Vit D because I don't go outside much, and when I do I wear sunscreen. That's about it

I have bookmarked this article. It's a good summary of recent studies showing that some supplements may have negative heath effects and the history of deregulation of supplements in the US. Plus it's written by one of my favorite medical experts Paul Offit!:thumbsup:

I also supplement with vitamin D as my D3 is very low.

I'm also a "stoner". I started developing kidney stones about a year and a half ago.* High blood calcium is associated with kidney stones. So while I I can't supplement with calcium, I don't have to limit foods high in calcium. Getting calcium through foods reduces the incidence of kidney stones but calcium supplements increase your risk of getting kidney stones.

The following is a study which shows this relationship with an explanation.

http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=1887&page=2

Like you I try to get my vitamins through foods. It's not as hard as you would think to get the nutrients you need. But tbh, it's easier said than done when you're ill.

Barb

*That's the short version.:D
 

barbc56

Senior Member
Messages
3,657
Chocolate bars with bacon? Never heard of that. Interesting combination.

I'm not wild about bacon.

Wait, are you saying chocolate bacon or chocolate and bacon separately?

Either way you have a thoughtful hubby!

Barb
 

barbc56

Senior Member
Messages
3,657
Well, at least this is close.

FB_IMG_1445135448138.jpg
 

jepps

Senior Member
Messages
519
Location
Austria
This research also discusses health benefits of increased ROS formation, and therefore drawbacks because of to much antioxidants: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0891584911003121

Taken together, the data summarized and discussed in this review support the conclusion that CR, glucose restriction, and moderate physical activity share, at least in part, common mechanistic features that may influence the aging process, i.e., enhanced mitochondrial activity and subsequently increased ROS formation that ultimately induce an adaptive response (increased defense mechanisms and improved stress resistance), which culminates in metabolic health and extended longevity.
 

Hip

Senior Member
Messages
17,795
Antioxidants like ellagic acid, sulforaphane and luteolin have anti-cancer and anti-metastasis effects.