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Starting Psychotherapy

*GG*

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Kudos to you for reaching out for help, nothing wrong with that. Was going to do the same myself recently, just so much more on top of my illness, and no support really from family or friends. Would be nice to have a compassionate ear to listen, and possibly give me ideas on what I can do to improve my situation!

GG
 

erin

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@erin nothing to do with it... I’m very severe for almost one year, no life, no joy no nothing... that’s the reason... not the peanut butter on my bread
So sorry MartinDH, you are so young. I was few years older than you when I got ME. It was a dark place for a long time for me. I struggled so much, still fight with it today.

I was diagnosed 2008, some 3 years late after the initial infection. It took me many years and some ativan to realize that wheat and dairy is poison to me many of my ME flares started by them and lasted for very long episodes, 3 years in one instance. Very long and boring story, I had pneumonia few times and had used so many antibiotics which I believe caused the food reactions. There are better scientific words for this condition but I'm a bit tired and I don't want to write wrong names here, not a native speaker this does not help.

Recently, by completely eliminating foods, basically eating 10 foods, very strict diet, I got a little better after all that time. But if I eat stuff by mistake, it happens if I eat out (very rare) I feel that dark depression comes back. I flush it out of my system. No medical profession believes or understand this, I found out about this by myself and actually by researching various health boards in the internet.

I hope you get better, best wishes.
 

sb4

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@MartinDH Whilst I don't like the idea of most psych meds, I am on mirtazapine as I have found it to help my POTS and appitite, it did however have some heart related side effects although I am very sensitive to these things.

It works be increasing adrenalin, blocking histamine, and I think it also blocks serotonin.
 

lafarfelue

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I don't remember if you have POTS, but the SSRI escitalopram/Lexapro is meant to help with some symptoms, as well as with mental health. I don't believe it has any/much anticholinergic effect, so that is useful for us with ME/CFS.

I am happy with taking Lexapro, it works well enough for me to not want to curl up into a ball and be swallowed by the void.

However, I would strongly recommend seeing a psychiatrist to discuss medications; what would work best with what medications and supplements you already take, as well as your personal situation/system. It's the safest thing to do, I believe. You want to avoid triggering contraindications by mixing meds/supplements together.

A psychiatrist can also help adjust dosages or suggest different combinations of meds with much less guesswork than a standard doctor/GP.

As for a psychologist, you may need to try a couple of different ones until you find one you mesh with.

Good on you for being open to seeking help with your mental health. I wish you the best of luck
 

ScottTriGuy

Stop the harm. Start the research and treatment.
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Try the psychotherapy if you are able. Use one or two sessions to find out if you get on with the therapist. Finding the right one is important. If you do find him/ her then it should be a real support for you.
I concur. Research, fwiw, shows that the single most important positive factor in therapy is not the therapeutic mode, but the relationship with the therapist.

Having said that, there are a lot of useless, and some harmful (especially if they view ME as psychological), therapists, so beware if they like to dispense advice and tell you what to do, as opposed to evoking from you your goals and the challenges to their fruition.

Also, your sessions should be about you, not your therapist. Far too often I see therapists using "I" statements which shifts the focus to themselves: I'm glad you feel better. I'm happy you followed through on your goal this week. A similar thing happened to me...

They should be reflecting back your experiences - feelings, thoughts, behaviours - not placing their emotions on your actions / cognitions.

Ideally, the therapist would also be living with a chronic physical condition (in a perfect world they would have ME) so they are more likely to have the needed empathic insight that comes with lived experience.

Good luck.
 

perrier

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I concur. Research, fwiw, shows that the single most important positive factor in therapy is not the therapeutic mode, but the relationship with the therapist.

Having said that, there are a lot of useless, and some harmful (especially if they view ME as psychological), therapists, so beware if they like to dispense advice and tell you what to do, as opposed to evoking from you your goals and the challenges to their fruition.

Also, your sessions should be about you, not your therapist. Far too often I see therapists using "I" statements which shifts the focus to themselves: I'm glad you feel better. I'm happy you followed through on your goal this week. A similar thing happened to me...

They should be reflecting back your experiences - feelings, thoughts, behaviours - not placing their emotions on your actions / cognitions.

Ideally, the therapist would also be living with a chronic physical condition (in a perfect world they would have ME) so they are more likely to have the needed empathic insight that comes with lived experience.

Good luck.
Excellent advice Scott.
 

Martin aka paused||M.E.

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I concur. Research, fwiw, shows that the single most important positive factor in therapy is not the therapeutic mode, but the relationship with the therapist.

Having said that, there are a lot of useless, and some harmful (especially if they view ME as psychological), therapists, so beware if they like to dispense advice and tell you what to do, as opposed to evoking from you your goals and the challenges to their fruition.

Also, your sessions should be about you, not your therapist. Far too often I see therapists using "I" statements which shifts the focus to themselves: I'm glad you feel better. I'm happy you followed through on your goal this week. A similar thing happened to me...

They should be reflecting back your experiences - feelings, thoughts, behaviours - not placing their emotions on your actions / cognitions.

Ideally, the therapist would also be living with a chronic physical condition (in a perfect world they would have ME) so they are more likely to have the needed empathic insight that comes with lived experience.

Good luck.
Totally agree... think that’s the reason why I’m single
 
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Hi Martin, I did three years of therapy when I was first disabled and I am glad for it. It gave me coping strategies and ways to think of myself in this new life.

I take viibryd I know you are too sick to read right now, but maybe have someone look at this type of antidepressant for you. It is the only one that I didn't have major side effects from. The worst FOR ME was wellbutrin. It made me think I was better and I would push into bad PEM crashes. Additionally, I tend to talk alot and the wellbutrin made me want to talk and talk! Like too much coffee.

Here is a link to this class of antidepressants https://www.mdedge.com/psychiatry/a...guide-using-3-new-antidepressants-vilazodone#

As always I am in your corner cheering along always! I will take a free beer either way.
 
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..I often use saffron as an antidepressant, taking a dose of around 100 mg (of the saffron stamens) twice daily. The mood boost it gives kicks in within an hour or two....
That sounds good!.
I want to try Saffron too.

I look at the internet and the range of saffron supplements is overwhelming. What brand helped your depression?

If you know of any article that points to what brand of saffron and how much helps depression, please let me know. I am finding it hard to search for it
 

Hip

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I look at the internet and the range of saffron supplements is overwhelming. What brand helped your depression?
The main issue is avoiding fake saffron.

This video shows you how to distinguish real saffron from fake. Basically, fake saffron is corn silk dyed red, and the dye will come off in hot or cold water, and you find your "saffron" has turned orange. Whereas the real saffron remains bright red in water.

I've bought saffron online which turned out to be only 50% real saffron and 50% fake (because in hot water the red dye came off around half the stamens in my sample).

The 50% fake saffron still worked for antidepressant purposes, but I found I had to double my normal dose, as it was only 50% real saffron. I've tried a few Spanish saffron brands, and they all worked as mood boosters.

The brand I buy at present is Nipra Pure Spanish Saffron. This is "Coupe" which is the highest grade of Spanish saffron.

You can also buy saffron as a supplement, which may be a better option in terms of guaranteed purity, but I have not yet tried these supplements, so cannot compare.

https://www.healthmonthly.co.uk/swanson_superior_herbs_saffron_extract_2_safranal
https://www.healthmonthly.co.uk/swanson_full_spectrum_saffron_15mg_60_caps



ok, and how is the sleep when you added saffron @Hip
I've had no problem with it regarding sleep, but I have not taken it before bed. Usually take it in the morning or afternoon, and usually only on days that my depression returns. If you take really high doses it can be a bit stimulating, but with the 100 mg dose I take I don't find a problem.

My depression is neurologically caused (by an ongoing viral brain infection I expect), rather than caused by life events; so this depression comes and goes on its own accord, depending on my health. So I tend only to take saffron on days that I need it.

The mood-boosting effects kick in around 1 or 2 hours after eating 100 mg of saffron stamens (100 mg = about 30 stamens) and these effects last for most of the day before wearing off (so just one 100 mg dose a day may be enough, but you might find you want another booster dose later in the day).
 
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Hip

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do you just take them in tea? or do you straight up eat them, and if do how is the taste.
I usually just swallow the saffron stamens with a gulp of water, but you can also make a tea. It may work faster as a tea. The tea tastes OK, not particularly delicious, but not bad tasting either.