Some CFS patients just have Iron Deficiency Without Anemia, an internist found

Judee

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How common are these low blood iron issues in ME/CFS patients and could they be contributing to our symptoms?
I don't know but I have a sense we all might have something going on with iron because of a pathogen load.

Any idea what this likely pathogen could be? Is this a virus?
Oh, I'm sorry @xploit316, I thought I answered you on this but now I remember I started to research it and got lost down the rabbit hole.

Years ago, I had read that only some bacteria and cancers feed on iron but not viruses.

However, when you posted that question to me, I then started to search for "iron and viruses" and started to see some mention that talked about the covid and iron. That's when I got mentally lost because I couldn't figure out how/why they were saying covid was using the iron.

Anyway, at that point, my brain started to seek the path of least resistance and I moved onto something else probably intending to come back and answer you.

Unfortunately, the brain forecast today is still foggy. I'm putting this on watch though and if I do get a clearer moment maybe I can come back to this topic again. Hopefully.
 

Alvin2

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I don't know but I have a sense we all might have something going on with iron because of a pathogen load.



Oh, I'm sorry @xploit316, I thought I answered you on this but now I remember I started to research it and got lost down the rabbit hole.

Years ago, I had read that only some bacteria and cancers feed on iron but not viruses.

However, when you posted that question to me, I then started to search for "iron and viruses" and started to see some mention that talked about the covid and iron. That's when I got mentally lost because I couldn't figure out how/why they were saying covid was using the iron.

Anyway, at that point, my brain started to seek the path of least resistance and I moved onto something else probably intending to come back and answer you.

Unfortunately, the brain forecast today is still foggy. I'm putting this on watch though and if I do get a clearer moment maybe I can come back to this topic again. Hopefully.
Here is the Wikipedia article on it
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anemia_of_chronic_disease

I did some research when i was able and it might be caused by elevated IL6, there was a PR post that had options for lowering it, PQQ was one of them that i am going to try when i can get my hands on it.
 

tyson oberle

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If you want to know if low iron is responsible for your symptoms, you need to raise your ferritin up to 100 ng/ml and your Transferrin Saturation above 20%.

But if your iron levels are low, it may be that you have some problem with non heme iron absorption and supplementation won't be that easy.

IV iron have shown to produce inflammation, and ferrous sulfate may increase pathogenic gut bacteria.

My own experience with iron supplementation to raise ferritin over 2.5 months showed me what works for me, this is my daily iron cocktail:

-iron bisglycinate
-lactoferrin
-red meat
Do you think iron bisglycinate would be better than a heme iron supplement? And if so, why?
 

Alvin2

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A friend suggested a Hematologist, i am going to look into that.
 

tyson oberle

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what heme iron supplement do you think about?
Shant1 in a previous post in this thread mentioned Proferrin which an "oral iron supplement made from naturally sourced heme iron polypeptide (HIP), which is iron derived from bovine hemoglobin. Proferrin has these advantages compared to other non-heme iron supplements."
I already bought some iron bisglycinate and lactoferrin, but I am wondering if Proferrin or another heme iron supplement would be better
 

pattismith

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Shant1 in a previous post in this thread mentioned Proferrin which an "oral iron supplement made from naturally sourced heme iron polypeptide (HIP), which is iron derived from bovine hemoglobin. Proferrin has these advantages compared to other non-heme iron supplements."
I already bought some iron bisglycinate and lactoferrin, but I am wondering if Proferrin or another heme iron supplement would be better
if you can't eat red meat, it may be useful, because "Heme iron absorption is relatively independent of the effects of various promoters/inhibitors of iron absorption in the food matrix (except for calcium, see below)"

"Heme iron, which is ferrous iron present in haemoglobin in the red blood cells and myoglobin in the myocytes, is absorbed within the intact protoporphyrin molecule threefold to fourfold more efficiently than inorganic ferric iron."


Here factors promoting or inhibiting non heme iron absorption:
1645535074029.png



Hepcidin is the ultimate limiting factor for iron absorption, both heme or non heme

1645535277169.png




A Review of Nutrients and Compounds, Which Promote or Inhibit Intestinal Iron Absorption: Making a Platform for Dietary Measures That Can Reduce Iron Uptake in Patients with Genetic Haemochromatosis (hindawi.com)
 

pattismith

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I don't know but I have a sense we all might have something going on with iron because of a pathogen load.
Maybe it's pathogens, or maybe it's alpha1 adrenergic overactivation (some of us have high level of autoantibodies activating these receptors)

The α1-adrenergic receptor is involved in hepcidin upregulation induced by adrenaline and norepinephrine via the STAT3 pathway - PubMed (nih.gov)

Taken together, we found that ADrenaline or Noradrenaline increase hepatic hepcidin expression via the α1-adrenergic receptor and STAT3 pathways in mice.
And when hepcidin raise, iron absorption is reduced...