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skullcap?

leaves

Senior Member
Messages
1,193
Any experience with this herb? I hear it reduces seizures and allergies and anxiety and improves sleep...
 

perchance dreamer

Senior Member
Messages
1,685
I haven't tried skullcap by itself, but it is part of a supplement I take every night for sleep. It really helps.

The product name is Jarrow Stresstame. For a description and user reviews, go to the Health Superstore web site and do a search on Jarrow Stresstame.

This supplement is really potent. I can't take more than 1, but that's probably because I take a lot of other things for sleep.
 

leaves

Senior Member
Messages
1,193
Thanks Dreamer,
I like to try supplements separately to see how I react but this def sounds like something I want to try :)
 

Mya Symons

Mya Symons
Messages
1,029
Location
Washington
Thanks Dreamer,
I like to try supplements separately to see how I react but this def sounds like something I want to try :)

This does sound really interesting. I am going to try this. It sounds like it would stop muscle twitching. This is a description from Mountain Rose Herbs:

Scutellaria lateriflora, Scutellaria, Scullcap, Scute, Blue Skullcap, Mad-Dog Skullcap, and Madweed.

Introduction
Skullcap is an herbaceous perennial mint with ridged leaves and tiny flowers that can range in color from purple and blue to pink and white. The two-lobed flowers resemble the military helmets worn by early European settlers—hence the herb's name. A hardy plant, it grows 1 to 4 feet (25 cm to 1 m) high, thriving in the woods and swamplands of eastern North America. Skullcap has been traditionally used by North American Indians as a nerve tonic and diuretic. It was highly valued by the Cherokee and other tribes as an emmenagogue and female medicinal herb, sometimes used as a ceremonial plant to introduce young girls into womanhood. Settlers in the late 1700's promoted the herb's effectiveness as a cure for rabies, giving rise to one of its common names, mad dog weed. This claim was later discarded, and herbalists began to focus on the plant's considerable value as a sedative. Skullcap reduces stress, anxiety and nervous tension, promotes inner calm, and counteracts insomnia. Because of its antispasmodic action, it may also be helpful in treating menstrual cramps, childbirth pains, and convulsions.
 

leaves

Senior Member
Messages
1,193
Yes but be sure you get Chinese skullcap : studies show it reduces seizures. American skullcap may actually increase seizures.