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Researchers propose ultrasound stimulation as an effective therapy for Alzheimer's disease in new study January 24, 2022

Alvin2

The good news is patients don't die the bad news..
Messages
3,036
Interesting, it may be breaking up the β-amyloid plaques and tau protein accumulations or dislodging them.
A symptom treatment and not a cure but if it works thats awesome.
I would expect increased brain bleeds or clots in aggregate over time but for the quality of life improvements people will line up for it if it works.
 

Alvin2

The good news is patients don't die the bad news..
Messages
3,036
where do we sign up?
I doubt you can but you could build your own.
A 30hz sound should be findable online and many computer speakers can play it.

That said there is no evidence that it will work for ME as it is not Alzheimers or Parkinsons.
 

Alvin2

The good news is patients don't die the bad news..
Messages
3,036
I doubt you can but you could build your own.
A 30hz sound should be findable online and many computer speakers can play it.

That said there is no evidence that it will work for ME as it is not Alzheimers or Parkinsons.
I have some sounds of different frequencies from years ago saved on my computer, i don't know how to upload them to PR
 

Alvin2

The good news is patients don't die the bad news..
Messages
3,036
Agree, but tempting none the less.....
Fair enough, they just give me a headache.

I have about 30 .wav files of different frequencies, but have no idea how to upload them to PR.
Also many speakers will have trouble with the super low frequencies but you don't know till you try.
 

Wishful

Senior Member
Messages
5,790
Location
Alberta
A 30hz sound should be findable online and many computer speakers can play it.

It's not a 30 Hz sound; it's an ultrasonic signal modulated at 30 Hz. Most computer speakers won't handle signals > 20 kHz (many won't even reach that). The article doesn't say what frequency of ultrasound or power levels or whether it has to be tightly focused. It's still possible to reproduce it at home (if they provide specifications), but it's not as simple as a .wav file through computer speakers.
 

Alvin2

The good news is patients don't die the bad news..
Messages
3,036
It's not a 30 Hz sound; it's an ultrasonic signal modulated at 30 Hz. Most computer speakers won't handle signals > 20 kHz (many won't even reach that). The article doesn't say what frequency of ultrasound or power levels or whether it has to be tightly focused. It's still possible to reproduce it at home (if they provide specifications), but it's not as simple as a .wav file through computer speakers.
Are you sure on this, the article says

applying ultrasound pulses at 40 Hz, i.e., in the gamma frequency band, into the brain of an AD-model mice.
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2022/01/220124103914.htm

Also
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/ar...ma-band activity (GBA),and motor control [23].
 

Alvin2

The good news is patients don't die the bad news..
Messages
3,036
A zip file with different frequency sounds.
I warn you that these are taxing mentally and physically to listen to.

So do so at your own risk, a crash is not worth it.
 

Attachments

  • Different Frequency Sounds.zip
    7.2 MB · Views: 10

Wishful

Senior Member
Messages
5,790
Location
Alberta
Are you sure on this, the article says

Yes, 'ultrasound pulses at 40 Hz' means short bursts of ultrasound (wild guess of >40 kHz) at a repetition rate of 40 pulses per second. Bats and cetaceans echolocate by emitting short bursts of ultrasound. I suppose you could try training them to provide the pulses. :whistle:

The article didn't give the ultrasonic frequency or the pulse width or the power level, so you'd have to experiment or better yet, just ask them. I expect the lab equipment is producing fairly high power levels (100's of watts) fairly tightly beamed, so this is not a 'listen to your computer speakers' technique; ears are not involved.