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Researchers identify bacteria as possible trigger for MS

Sea

Senior Member
Messages
1,286
Location
NSW Australia
I haven't chased up the actual study which the article says is published in PloS ONE but this looks interesting.

http://www.news-medical.net/news/20...a-believed-to-trigger-multiple-sclerosis.aspx


"Variant of common soil-based pathogen found for the first time in a patient with MS

A research team from Weill Cornell Medical College and The Rockefeller University has identified a bacterium it believes may trigger multiple sclerosis (MS), a chronic, debilitating disorder that damages myelin forming cells in the brain and spinal cord.

Their study, published in PLoS ONE, is the first to identify the bacterium, Clostridium (C.) perfringens type B, in humans.

The scientists say their study is small and must be expanded before a definitive connection between the pathogen and MS can be made, but they also say their findings are so intriguing that they have already begun to work on new treatments for the disease."
...
 
Messages
64
Chlamydia pneumonia and rickettsia have also been linked to MS in the past. There's a genetic component in MS as well so I wonder if this isn't just another possible trigger which doesn't reveal much about the disease or how to treat.
 

SOC

Senior Member
Messages
7,849
Nice find! Still, this is a common soil-based organism, so millions of people are exposed to it every year, but only a relative few get MS. There has to be a lot more to the story.
 

Creekee

Senior Member
Messages
143
Location
Arizona
Also, Stephen Fry claims he finds his protomyxzoa rheumatica cootie in virtually all his MS patients. Yet another possible trigger...
 

SOC

Senior Member
Messages
7,849
Also, Stephen Fry claims he finds his protomyxzoa rheumatica cootie in virtually all his MS patients. Yet another possible trigger...

Triggers or opportunistic infections due to immune dysfunction, I wonder.