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red faced

Judee

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I was watching a documentary on ME/CFS and noticed that many of the patients had a lot of redness on their faces--cheeks, nose, forehead, and ears.

My ears don't seem to be affected but I do have redness on the other areas and have for years. Initially it was diagnosed as rosacea and later as keratosis pillaris but really I don't think that later diagnosis is correct either. (I have also been tested for Lupus since it runs in my family but that was negative.)

Anyway, just wondering how many other people here have that redness on their faces. My niece, used to say I had 5th's disease which is caused by parvovirus B19 and I see that Healthrising had an article on that in 2003 as causing some cases of ME/CFS.

Has anyone been tested for parvovirus B19 and had positive titers?
 

Wolfcub

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No I haven't been tested for Parvovirus....I never thought of that. I did have a blood test checked specifically for any form of infection -at all -and it came back squeaky clean.
I don't have redness of my face or any other body part, or ears. I do however have some redness of my hands, yet liver results are all healthy and OK. I thought it was from the harsh way my hands have been treated over many years. (detergent, ice, not wearing gloves when I should, hot water as I wash clothes by hand.)
 

Wishful

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Yes to redness. I assume it's rosacea, though I never bothered to ask a doctor. Its severity correlates with immune activation, so I wouldn't be surprised that it's more common among ME/CFS patients, with our misbehaving immune systems. On days when I'm feeling reasonably well, my skin returns to normal.
 

Gondwanaland

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I have been diagnosed with Rosacea.

According to my dermatologist, who only treats symptoms, the main cause for Rosacea is UVA rays. So she prescribes a UVA blocker to apply on the face. A friend of mine resolved her rosacea with this approach. Unfortunately I am completely intolerant to any type of make up / cosmetic lotions on my face (even hypoallergenic).

I noticed that vit B2 and vit A (taken orally) improve the redness, but do not resolve it. Interestingly B2 and vit A should always be taken at bedtime since they are photosensitizers. I think the use of UVA blocker is precisely to avoid the degradation of these two vitamins in the skin.

According to my orthomolecular dr, Rosacea is caused by pancreatic insufficiency. In fact, I noticed that it is closely related with fructose malabsorption - not as much from sugar, but pretty much from fruit, so I would say that SIBO is also an issue. Also, years ago when I still tolerated a little alcohol, a sip of wine would paint my face red. :oops:

In the past I had Keratosis Pilaris in my arms, but this one is definetly caused by low vit A and defficiency in other fat-soluble vitamins.
 

Wishful

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I don't know for absolute sure that I have clinical rosacea, but whatever it is, it correlates to immune activation. I haven't noticed a correlation to sun exposure. UVA is a 'main cause' for only 60% of sufferers, so there's still that other 40% with different causes.
 

Learner1

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From Karger:
As some rosacea patients complain of gastrointestinal troubles and the administration of pancreatic extracts ameliorates both dyspepsia and skin lesions, the pancreatic exocrine function in 21 subjects affected with rosacea has been investigated by means of the secretin-cerulein infusion test. 21 healthy controls have been studied for comparison. No difference was found between rosacea and control subjects for flow rate, bicarbonate and chymotrypsin concentration and output, while lipase concentration and output was significantly lower in rosacea patients, with a decrease ranging from 18.5 to 66% of normal values.

Therefore, a deficient lipase secretion could be responsible, at least partly, for the clinical manifestations of rosacea.
 

Gondwanaland

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Back in 2013 I realized that eating Bananas noticeably worsened my Rosacea. I went to a nutritionist who suggested a GF diet, which greatly helped my skin issues ( @Wishful immune activation o_O ) but didn't resolve it. A couple of months later I took Metronidazole and my skin cleared completely for several years. Perhaps it's time to take abx again :rolleyes:

@Learner1 Interestingly I measured serum Lipase early this year and the reference range here is < 60 U/L. My resul was out of range at 76. I got elevated Amilase as well, but within range.
 

Learner1

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There are other reasons for rosacea, too:

From: https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/78839.php

The scientists found that people with rosacea have high levels of the anti microbial peptide cathelicidin in their skin and the proteins this produces are different to those found in people who do not have the disease. Another important contributor is an enzyme called stratum corneum tryptic enzyme (SCTE).
And allergies (which may be related to gut dysbiosis):

One of the best ways to approach rosacea is to look for and uncover triggers. A trigger is something that, once consumed, will lead to a flaring of symptoms. Each person has their own unique set of triggers. Some of the most common triggers are alcohol, caffeine, and hot drinks, but here is a list of other common triggers:
  • Caffeine containing foods and beverages: hot tea and coffee being the worse.
  • Foods high in histamines: these include fermented foods (including wine, beer, ciders and vinegars) canned fish (such as anchovies, tuna, herring, sardines, and mackerel) processed meats (beef, pork, chicken) and even some Oriental foods.
  • Any spicy food: paprika, pepper, cayenne and others.
  • Additives: while the list of addictives can be long, the most common culprits are nitrates, sulfates and MSG.
  • Other foods: citrus fruits, sharp cheeses, chocolate, tomatoes.
It is well worth the effort of keeping a food journal for a few months to uncover your triggers.

Some health practitioners also associate rosacea with food allergies. This is not the kind of food allergy that produces severe reactions (like to peanuts), but more of a low-level allergy that can produce other symptoms such as upset stomach, itching, and other rashes. Many of these food allergies go unnoticed and are only made clear by their removal and the clearing up of rosacea.

The most common food allergies are to wheat, dairy, eggs, soy, corn and nuts.

While it can be quite a challenge to remove these foods form the diet, a trial of a week or two away from all these, followed by reintroduction of these foods (one at a time), is a great way to zero in on your own personal food allergies
Another area to look into is low stomach acid and nutrient deficiencies:

https://www.pulselightclinic.co.uk/rosacea/nutritional-deficiencies-in-those-with-rosacea
 

Malea

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I had a red face all my life and got diagnosed with rosacea in my teens. Nothing (wearing sun lotion every day, laser treatment,..) helped. It was last year, when I had the outbreak of my severe MCAS and couldn‘t tolerate most foods anymore that my rosacea disappeared.

I first thought it was a histamine topic, but when I tried to reintroduce spelt-products into my diet the redness immediately came back. So, I think in my case, it surely has something to do with gluten. I never had positive antibodies/ biopies for a gluten intolerance, though.
 
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Gondwanaland

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it surely has something to do with gluten. I never had positive antibodies/ biopies for a gluten intolerance, though.
If you are not celiac, then it is intolerance to the starch in some grains, AKA intolerance to FODMAPs (study attached).

My understanding is that at some point dysbiosis occurred and I lost the beneficial bacteria which digested that stuff for me.
 

Attachments

Malea

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If you are not celiac, then it is intolerance to the starch in some grains, AKA intolerance to FODMAPs (study attached).

My understanding is that at some point dysbiosis occurred and I lost the beneficial bacteria which digested that stuff for me.

I don‘t really feel like it is about starch. I eat a lot of rice, which, if I’m right, contains a lot of starch. But the redness doesn‘t occur with rice.

Thanks for the attached study, I will have a look at it.
 

pamojja

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I noticed that vit B2 and vit A (taken orally) improve the redness, but do not resolve it. Interestingly B2 and vit A should always be taken at bedtime since they are photosensitizers.
That's new to me. Though it probably doesn't ably to me - having to take vit A and B2 at bedtime - because since I started comprehensive supplementation I haven't gotten even once a sun-burn. And Redness exclusively with Niacin flushing only.
 

Wishful

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I went to a nutritionist who suggested a GF diet, which greatly helped my skin issues ( @Wishful immune activation o_O ) but didn't resolve it.
It's just my observation of what triggers my rosacea. Specifically t-cell activation. When I had my type IV food sensitivity (which activates t-cells), I noticed that whenever I managed to avoid triggering a reaction, my skin cleared up. When I next triggered a reaction, red, oily skin again. Muscle strain (which also activates t-cells) does the same thing. I can't remember whether I paid attention during viral infections, but I assume they triggered rosacea flare-ups too.
 

Gondwanaland

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I don‘t really feel like it is about starch. I eat a lot of rice, which, if I’m right, contains a lot of starch. But the redness doesn‘t occur with rice.
AFAIK the starch in rice is very different from the other grasses. Rice is considered a safe starch in most diets that allow starch. I have no problem with it either.