Question regarding differential diagnosis

Mrparadise

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Dear PR members

I am curious which other diseases are mimicking ME/CFS the best. Also I would like to know which one of those have the highest prevalence and should therefore be ruled out first. The diseases/problems I am most interested in are:

-UARS (upper airway resistance syndrome) - - > because of a deviated septum and a misplaced jaw
-Occult infections that most doctors are not able to find or regular tests often miss (something like mycoplasma)
-Hormonal imbalance becaue of chronic drug abuse (mostly cannabis)
-Deficiency of trace minerals (like zinc, selenium, etc.)
-A latent Virus without with high IGM levels found (and not even extremely high IGG levels)
-A neurochemical imbalance of some neurotransmitters
-Gut Dysbiosis/SIBO
-Scoliosis
-AAI/CCI/Chiari

Like, I would love to know what of those diseases/problems mentioned above are most likely to affect someome and in the same time could mimick CFS the best.

Many thanks in advance!
 
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add: Lordosis (since your including scoliosus).

My lordosis was the original spinal problem: seen in my toddler body. And its a major energy blockage in the spine. Its incredibly likely for stenosis to occur someplace, and teethered cord likely here.
 

pattismith

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Mrparadise

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Many thanks to everyone for responding - highly appreciated.

What would you say are the things, which are most likely to affect people (highest prevalence)? I am about to exclude more diseases because this is in my opinion the best thing we could do as there is still nothing that really helps or cures ME/CFS.... :/

Have most of you already ruled out all those diseases from the above list yet?

@pattismith Do you really think that Gilbert's is able to mimic ME/CFS? Also, are there any tests in order to exclude D Lactic acidosis?

Do we have a list which states how many people thought they have ME/CFS (or even got officially diagnosed with it) but in the end were affected by anything else? I mean something like: 5% in this forum had undiagnosed sleep apnea, 3% AAI/CCI, etc?
 
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pattismith

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I don't think we have statistics like this on PR, but people on the forum have had occasionally these diagnostics, so you will find informations here about it if you look for it.

One of the most common rheumatic disease diagnosed among PR members is Sjogren with associated SFN (small fiber neuropathy), and especially Seronegative Sjogren, because it's often missed by medical system.
 

Learner1

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Many thanks to everyone for responding - highly appreciated.

What would you say are the things, which are most likely to affect people (highest prevalence)? I am about to exclude more diseases because this is in my opinion the best thing we could do as there is still nothing that really helps or cures ME/CFS.... :/

Have most of you already ruled out all those diseases from the above list yet?

@pattismith Do you really think that Gilbert's is able to mimic ME/CFS? Also, are there any tests in order to exclude D Lactic acidosis?

Do we have a list which states how many people thought they have ME/CFS (or even got officially diagnosed with it) but in the end were affected by anything else? I mean something like: 5% in this forum had undiagnosed sleep apnea, 3% AAI/CCI, etc?
Most people with ME/CFS have one or several other treatable conditions. The two lists in the documents that @wabi-sabi posted are an excellent place to hunt for these conditions. There are also cases of mitochondrial disease and many other rare diseases. Treating the things that can be treated can dramatically improve outcomes.
 

Martial

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Lyme disease and co infections, as well as any other chronic stealth infections. This is a big thing a lot of people miss because it's so hard to get proper diagnosis and tests can be very hit or miss. The longer you're sick or more severely the less chance you'll have antibodies that show up enough on blood tests like the western blot. Which in turn will mean by CDC standards that you are lyme negative, even if you have a completely overwhelming infection.