Positive toxoplasmosis igm and igg

Cipher

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There's a German doctor named Dr. Med. Uwe Auf der Strasse who thinks ME/CFS can be caused by a chronic active toxoplasmosis infection. He got a website with a lot of information, and he has written a book about the subject called "Shadow Disease chronic active Toxoplasmosis".
Shadow Disease chronic active Toxoplasmosis: How it deceives medicine and makes us sick - and how to diagnose and treat it

Tiredness, exhaustion, muscular pain, listlessness, shortness of breath with exertion, profuse sweating, morning stiffness, joint pains, concentration disorder, forgetfulness, depressive moods, aggressive behaviour, anxieties, visual disturbance, dizziness, sleeping disorder Toxoplasma gondii is a tiny parasite which infects 30 - 50% of the world's population. The symptoms listed above can result if it becomes chronically active – an alarming disease which affects far more people than has been historically assumed. In Germany about 800.000 patients could be affected, and it can be assumed that there are many more worldwide. Toxoplasma gondii is equipped with outstanding camouflage abilities, and often cannot be detected by our standard lab tests, and therefore the prevalence of Toxoplasma related diseases is vastly underestimated by medicine. The result is that many patients who suffer from this disease do not have a chronic active toxoplasmosis considered by their physician. Often these patients receive treatment for a supposed psychosomatic disorder, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue, seronegative rheumatoid arthritis and many more rather than the treatment they need for their very real problem. This book shows, based on basic research and in a comprehensible and comprehensive way, how chronic active toxoplasmosis can be diagnosed and how health can readily be restored by the appropriate therapy. Many patients could have a significant benefit from this, if only medicine could free itself from the incorrect and outdated idea that Toxoplasma were harmless and that its activity could be diagnosed easily and securely by standard lab procedures.
 

ChookityPop

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There's a German doctor named Dr. Med. Uwe Auf der Strasse who thinks ME/CFS can be caused by a chronic active toxoplasmosis infection. He got a website with a lot of information, and he has written a book about the subject called "Shadow Disease chronic active Toxoplasmosis".
Interersting, Im going down the rabbit hole on this now.

Do you know How he treats toxoplasmosis?
 

nerd

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It's responsible for treatment-resistant Lyme disease in combination with certain HLA-DR genotypes. So it's basically responsible for rheumatological CFS/ME after a Lyme disease trigger. I wouldn't be surprised if it also shows synergistic pathological effects with viruses, as I mentioned here, and thereby trigger post-viral CFS/ME.
 

uglevod

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Evaluation of nitazoxanide(alinia) as a novel drug for the treatment of acute and chronic toxoplasmosis
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30986380/

Significant Reduction of Brain Cysts Caused by Toxoplasma gondii after Treatment with Spiramycin Coadministered with Metronidazole in a Mouse Model of Chronic Toxoplasmosis
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3318357/

Repurposing auranofin for treatment of Experimental Cerebral Toxoplasmosis
https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11686-021-00337-z

In Vitro Effects of Ivermectin and Sulphadiazine on Toxoplasma gondii
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4116007/

[Effects of clindamycin and josamycin in experimental Toxoplasma gondii infections]
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/6504394/


EVALUATION OF THE EFFECT OF TYLOSIN (MACROLIDE ANTIBIOTICS) ON MURINE TOXOPLASMOSIS
https://ijpsr.com/bft-article/evalu...iotics-on-murine-toxoplasmosis/?view=fulltext

Latent Toxoplasmosis and Human
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3488815/

Toxoplasmosis is one of the most common parasitic diseases worldwide. Although estimated that one third of the world's population are infected with Toxoplasma gondii, but the most common form of the disease is latent (asymptomatic). On the other hand, recent findings indicated that latent toxoplasmosis is not only unsafe for human, but also may play various roles in the etiology of different mental disorders. This paper reviews new findings about importance of latent toxoplasmosis (except in immunocompromised patients) in alterations of behavioral parameters and also its role in the etiology of schizophrenia and depressive disorders, obsessive–compulsive disorder, Alzheimer's diseases and Parkinson's disease, epilepsy, headache and or migraine, mental retardation and intelligence quotients, suicide attempt, risk of traffic accidents, sex ratio and some possible mechanisms of T. gondii that could contribute in the etiology of these alterations.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8539083
Azithromycin can inhibit the growth of Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoïtes in vitro, but the effect is only observed with prolonged incubation with the drug, reflecting the delayed mode of action of this macrolide on the parasite.

Activity of minocycline against Toxoplasma gondii infection in mice.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1885421

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC284352/
The activity of the macrolide antibiotic clarithromycin was examined alone or in combination with other drugs for the treatment of acute or chronic infections with Toxoplasma gondii in mice. A dose of 300 mg of clarithromycin per kg per day administered alone for 10 days, beginning 24 hours after infection, protected 10 to 30% of mice infected with lethal inocula of tachyzoites or tissue cysts of different strains of T. gondii, including some strains isolated from patients with both AIDS and toxoplasmosis. Although clarithromycin was protective, a wide variation in its activity against different strains was observed. Survival of infected mice was increased significantly by treatment with clarithromycin in combination with pyrimethamine or with sulfadiazine. Treatment of chronically infected mice with clarithromycin at 300 mg/kg/day administered alone for 8 weeks resulted in significant reduction in the numbers of T. gondii cysts in their brains


https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC284352/
The combination of clarithromycin and minocycline resulted in an activity against T. gondii cysts that was significantly greater than the activity of clarithromycin or minocycline administered alone. These results indicate a role for clarithromycin in the treatment of human toxoplasmosis, particularly when this antibiotic is used in combination with other drugs with activity against T. gondii.

Successful Treatment of Cerebral Toxoplasmosis with Clindamycin: A Case Report
2012 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3472581/

Toxoplasmosis is caused by infection with the obligate intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii. Toxoplasmosis is generally a late complication of HIV infection and usually occurs in patients with CD4 + T-cell counts below 200/μl. Co-trimoxazole (trimethoprim plus sulfamethoxazole) is the most common drug used in India for the treatment of AIDS-associated cerebral toxoplasmosis. Other alternative drugs used for the treatment of cerebral toxoplasmosis are clindamycin plus pyrimethamine and clarithromycin with pyrimethamine.

Cerebral toxoplasmosis treated with clindamycin alone in an HIV-positive patient allergic to sulfonamides
http://www.ijidonline.com/article/S1201-9712(04)00170-5/abstract

Combination of Clindamycin and Azithromycin as Alternative Treatment for Toxoplasma gondii Encephalitis
https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/25/4/18-1689_article

Removal of Toxoplasma gondii Cysts from the Brain by Perforin-Mediated Activity of CD8+ T Cells
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2843452/

Activity of minocycline against Toxoplasma gondii infection in mice.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1885421

1994 Treatment of Presumed Cerebral Toxoplasmosis with Azithromycin
http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJM199402243300817#t=article

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1655433
In vivo activity of the macrolide antibiotics azithromycin, roxithromycin and spiramycin against Toxoplasma gondii.The macrolide antibiotics azithromycin, roxithromycin and spiramycin were examined in parallel for in vivo activity against Toxoplasma gondii. Azithromycin was considerably more active in protecting mice against death due to acute toxoplasmosis even when the other two antibiotics were used at twice its dose.
 

sometexan84

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I was neg. for T gondii

Though it could be involved in chronic fatigue, I see it often in my research. It can cause SLE, antiphospholipid syndrome, NMDA antibodies, complement dysfunction, and this is all I know.
 

uglevod

Senior Member
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There's a German doctor named Dr. Med. Uwe Auf der Strasse who thinks ME/CFS can be caused by a chronic active toxoplasmosis infection. He got a website with a lot of information, and he has written a book about the subject called "Shadow Disease chronic active Toxoplasmosis".
Interesting, thanks for posting this.

https://en.toxoplasmachronic.com/2-faelle-mit-positivem-ltt

I developed a Revolving Therapy concept, which proofed to be highly effective in these cases - this is one of the possible combinations I prescribe in many cases:

- Pyrimethamine 25 mg 2 x 1 and Calciumfolinate 6,35 mg 1 x 1 were taken continuously.


An antiobiotic was added, at first
- Cotrimoxazole 960 mg 2 x 1, after 5 days this was changed to
- Clarithromycine 500 mg 2 x 1, after 5 days this was changed to
- Clindamycine 300 mg 3 x 1, after 5 days this was switched back to
- Cotrimoxazole 960 mg 2 x 1 again, and the whole system was repeated.

This revolving therapy resulted in a continuous improvement of all symptoms.


^^^
So basically he rotates different antibiotics(to mess with parasite resistance to the particular one).


 

ChookityPop

Senior Member
Messages
527
Likes
686
Evaluation of nitazoxanide(alinia) as a novel drug for the treatment of acute and chronic toxoplasmosis
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30986380/

Significant Reduction of Brain Cysts Caused by Toxoplasma gondii after Treatment with Spiramycin Coadministered with Metronidazole in a Mouse Model of Chronic Toxoplasmosis
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3318357/

Repurposing auranofin for treatment of Experimental Cerebral Toxoplasmosis
https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11686-021-00337-z

In Vitro Effects of Ivermectin and Sulphadiazine on Toxoplasma gondii
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4116007/

[Effects of clindamycin and josamycin in experimental Toxoplasma gondii infections]
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/6504394/


EVALUATION OF THE EFFECT OF TYLOSIN (MACROLIDE ANTIBIOTICS) ON MURINE TOXOPLASMOSIS
https://ijpsr.com/bft-article/evalu...iotics-on-murine-toxoplasmosis/?view=fulltext

Latent Toxoplasmosis and Human
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3488815/

Toxoplasmosis is one of the most common parasitic diseases worldwide. Although estimated that one third of the world's population are infected with Toxoplasma gondii, but the most common form of the disease is latent (asymptomatic). On the other hand, recent findings indicated that latent toxoplasmosis is not only unsafe for human, but also may play various roles in the etiology of different mental disorders. This paper reviews new findings about importance of latent toxoplasmosis (except in immunocompromised patients) in alterations of behavioral parameters and also its role in the etiology of schizophrenia and depressive disorders, obsessive–compulsive disorder, Alzheimer's diseases and Parkinson's disease, epilepsy, headache and or migraine, mental retardation and intelligence quotients, suicide attempt, risk of traffic accidents, sex ratio and some possible mechanisms of T. gondii that could contribute in the etiology of these alterations.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8539083
Azithromycin can inhibit the growth of Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoïtes in vitro, but the effect is only observed with prolonged incubation with the drug, reflecting the delayed mode of action of this macrolide on the parasite.

Activity of minocycline against Toxoplasma gondii infection in mice.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1885421

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC284352/
The activity of the macrolide antibiotic clarithromycin was examined alone or in combination with other drugs for the treatment of acute or chronic infections with Toxoplasma gondii in mice. A dose of 300 mg of clarithromycin per kg per day administered alone for 10 days, beginning 24 hours after infection, protected 10 to 30% of mice infected with lethal inocula of tachyzoites or tissue cysts of different strains of T. gondii, including some strains isolated from patients with both AIDS and toxoplasmosis. Although clarithromycin was protective, a wide variation in its activity against different strains was observed. Survival of infected mice was increased significantly by treatment with clarithromycin in combination with pyrimethamine or with sulfadiazine. Treatment of chronically infected mice with clarithromycin at 300 mg/kg/day administered alone for 8 weeks resulted in significant reduction in the numbers of T. gondii cysts in their brains


https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC284352/
The combination of clarithromycin and minocycline resulted in an activity against T. gondii cysts that was significantly greater than the activity of clarithromycin or minocycline administered alone. These results indicate a role for clarithromycin in the treatment of human toxoplasmosis, particularly when this antibiotic is used in combination with other drugs with activity against T. gondii.

Successful Treatment of Cerebral Toxoplasmosis with Clindamycin: A Case Report
2012 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3472581/

Toxoplasmosis is caused by infection with the obligate intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii. Toxoplasmosis is generally a late complication of HIV infection and usually occurs in patients with CD4 + T-cell counts below 200/μl. Co-trimoxazole (trimethoprim plus sulfamethoxazole) is the most common drug used in India for the treatment of AIDS-associated cerebral toxoplasmosis. Other alternative drugs used for the treatment of cerebral toxoplasmosis are clindamycin plus pyrimethamine and clarithromycin with pyrimethamine.

Cerebral toxoplasmosis treated with clindamycin alone in an HIV-positive patient allergic to sulfonamides
http://www.ijidonline.com/article/S1201-9712(04)00170-5/abstract

Combination of Clindamycin and Azithromycin as Alternative Treatment for Toxoplasma gondii Encephalitis
https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/25/4/18-1689_article

Removal of Toxoplasma gondii Cysts from the Brain by Perforin-Mediated Activity of CD8+ T Cells
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2843452/

Activity of minocycline against Toxoplasma gondii infection in mice.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1885421

1994 Treatment of Presumed Cerebral Toxoplasmosis with Azithromycin
http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJM199402243300817#t=article

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1655433
In vivo activity of the macrolide antibiotics azithromycin, roxithromycin and spiramycin against Toxoplasma gondii.The macrolide antibiotics azithromycin, roxithromycin and spiramycin were examined in parallel for in vivo activity against Toxoplasma gondii. Azithromycin was considerably more active in protecting mice against death due to acute toxoplasmosis even when the other two antibiotics were used at twice its dose.
Thank you so much, I really appreciate this! I will dig into this!
 

ChookityPop

Senior Member
Messages
527
Likes
686
I was neg. for T gondii

Though it could be involved in chronic fatigue, I see it often in my research. It can cause SLE, antiphospholipid syndrome, NMDA antibodies, complement dysfunction, and this is all I know.
Interesting! I will have a look at this!