Please help me find this thread/article

Alvin2

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Within the last month or two there was an article or study posted on PR that mentioned three parts of the body the immune system does not operate in, i forget what parts they were and what article/link it was from.
I thought i bookmarked it but apparently my brain is playing tricks on me.

If this sounds familiar please toss a link in to this thread.

TIA
 

Pyrrhus

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Don't know of the thread/article, but the three parts of the body that are though of as "immune-privileged" are the central nervous system, the eyes, and the testicles.

Although the blood-borne immune system is blocked from those three parts of the body, each of these "immune-privileged" parts of the body harbor their own "tissue-resident" immune cells, which function kind of like their own little immune system, separate from the blood-borne immune system.

Hope this helps.
 

Wishful

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The body doesn't have "an" immune system, it has several that interact with each other in various ways. There's the IG system and the t-cells, the brain has glial cells, I haven't read about different ones in eyes and testicles. You could possibly consider our microbiomes as several different immune systems, since they may attack invaders or defective cells.

Given the way researchers have been finding previously unknown organs and cell types, any day now they might report discovering a completely new immune system.
 

halcyon

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There's the IG system and the t-cells
It’s arbitrary and largely wrong to draw to draw silos around these, immunoglobulin synthesis is heavily reliant on T cells, by way of antigen presentation to B cells. It’s called a system because it’s a sum of individual parts all working together, with possibly an unknowable amount of crosstalk and co-dependence between all the various moving parts.
 

Wishful

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It’s arbitrary and largely wrong to draw to draw silos around these
I disagree. I expect that IG cells and t cells evolved from different progenitors. Evolution would have increased their interdependency, but they retain separate system cores. Cells and mitochondria are highly interdependent, but they still remain separate entities.
 

Alvin2

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halcyon

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I disagree. I expect that IG cells and t cells evolved from different progenitors. Evolution would have increased their interdependency, but they retain separate system cores.
I doubt that's correct. T cells and B cells differentiate from the same lymphoid progenitor line, they're morphologically indistinguishable without further staining (though this isn't necessarily proof of evolutionary relation, and their differentiation is way more complex than the picture shows). The TCR and BCR genes share sequence homology and both receptors are generated by an effectively identical VDJ recombination process, effected by the same recombinase enzymes. For example, Flajnik and Kasahara (2010) states:
Antibodies were discovered over 100 years ago, and major questions relating to the generation of diversity were solved in the 1970s with the detection of somatic hypermutation1 and variable–diversity–joining rearrangement (VDJ rearrangement)2 of antibody (or immunoglobulin (Ig) or B cell receptor (BCR)) genes. In the 1980s, T cell receptors (TCRs) were discovered and there was universal agreement that they shared a common ancestor with BCR genes, based on their similar domain organization and reliance on the same rearrangement mechanism to generate diversity3. After the discovery of enzymes that are involved in the rearrangement of BCR and TCR genes4 and of hypermutation of BCR genes5, attention shifted to asking how a system that is capable of generating such diversity evolved.
BCR and TCR are the most closely related members of the larger immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF). There is some evidence to suggest that a γδ-like T cell was the more basal of antigen detecting lymphocytes, and that αβ T cells and B cells derive from it (Richards & Nelson, 2000).
 

Wishful

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I was thinking of the cells involved in common type 1 allergies, which are mast cells, and quite distantly related by that diagram. I was mistaken in my vague memory that there were different evolutionary origins for the IG and t-cell lines.