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Please consider bone density if severe

Little Bluestem

All Good Things Must Come to an End
Messages
4,930
According to my dr., bones need a lot more than calcium and vitamin D.
Specifically:
Phosphorus
Magnesium
Selenium
Copper
Manganese
Molybdenum
Boron
Vitamin K1
Vitamin K2
Folate
Ipriflavone


I have read (I don't recall where) that the drugs produce brittle bone. Even though your bones are denser, you are still at risk for a broken bone.
 

u&iraok

Senior Member
Messages
427
Location
U.S.
Posting here as people probably won't look at the bone section until they have a problem.
Blogged about trying to prevent osteoporosis in severe M.E, something we are at risk of but gets over looked. Not got the energy to copy/re write here so linking http://blogfullofhope.blogspot.co.uk/2016/05/bone-density-and-avoiding-osteoporsis.html

Thanks for this. I found out in my 30's that I was at risk for osteoporosis and went on a mad dash to get all the nutrients that @Little Bluestem mentions. I hope I did it in time.

Also: germanium

Too many funny little unknown trace elements that we current or former SAD eaters and modern-hybrid-veg-grown- with-pesticides-far-away-in-poor-soil recipients are deficient in.
 

PatJ

Forum Support Assistant
Messages
5,288
Location
Canada
When I take Vitamin D some of my other symptoms become worse so I've been avoiding it for years. A decade ago my blood tests showed low vitamin D.

A couple of months ago I tried 2,000 IU of D3 per day for a week, then 8,000 IU of D3 per day for a few days (along with a vitamin K complex for better absorption). After two days my bones started to ache. Could this be a sign that my bones were finally getting what they need, such as taking in more calcium due to the supplemented vitamin D?

I'm mostly bedbound at the moment due to OI so I can't make it to the hospital for a bone scan.
 

Little Bluestem

All Good Things Must Come to an End
Messages
4,930
@u&iraok , strontium is another mineral recommend for bones. It is supposed to be taken at least 4 hours away from calcium, which can be challenging.
 

u&iraok

Senior Member
Messages
427
Location
U.S.
@u&iraok , strontium is another mineral recommend for bones. It is supposed to be taken at least 4 hours away from calcium, which can be challenging.

Yes, that one too!

That is challenging to take it 4 hours away from calcium since it's usually in a multi or in a supplement with calcium.

The 'take this on an empty stomach', 'take this with food', 'take this in the morning', 'take this 45 minutes away from that' is enough to drive you crazy!
 

worldbackwards

Senior Member
Messages
2,051
I was diagnosed with osteopenia a couple of years ago after over a decade in bed. However, given that I am, in a general sense, on the up (with it's weebles and wobbles), my doctor said that if I continue to become ever more mobile (which has been the trend) then I probably wouldn't have anything to worry about and that it would correct itself over time.

But he does have a tendency to but a positive gloss on things that he can't do anything about. Still, best be hopeful anyway...
 

u&iraok

Senior Member
Messages
427
Location
U.S.
I was diagnosed with osteopenia a couple of years ago after over a decade in bed. However, given that I am, in a general sense, on the up (with it's weebles and wobbles), my doctor said that if I continue to become ever more mobile (which has been the trend) then I probably wouldn't have anything to worry about and that it would correct itself over time.

But he does have a tendency to but a positive gloss on things that he can't do anything about. Still, best be hopeful anyway...

The osteopenia thing is scaring people unessesarily (can't spell that!):

Avoid overdiagnosis and overtreatment: Usually, osteopenia doesn’t progress to osteoporosis. Fewer than 10 percent of post-menopausal women with mild osteopenia develop the condition within 15 years, fewer than 10 percent of women with moderate osteopenia develop it within five years, and fewer than 10 percent of women with advanced osteopenia progress to osteoporosis within a year, according to a 2012 study in the New England Journal of Medicine.
Most of the time, no treatment for osteopenia is needed other than diet and lifestyle changes. The evidence that osteoporosis drugs such as alendronate (Fosamax and generic) help during this stage is inconsistent. Instead, consider a repeat bone scan after several years.

http://www.pressreader.com/

We observe that manufacturer's reference ranges may not be appropriate for the local population and may lead to an erroneously high diagnosis of osteopenia and osteoporosis, which would lead to unnecessary patient anxiety and perhaps errors regarding treatment.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9425500
 

Rvanson

Senior Member
Messages
312
Location
USA
Fluoridated water can also cause decreased bone density as well, so its important to either stop the fluoride from being added to your drinking water, or to filter it out or buy non-fluoride water for consumption. The human body has NO need for any fluoride at all, and it can be a source of hormone and neurotransmitter disruption, as well.

Further, the main chemicals used to fluoridate drinking water are known as “silicofluorides” (i.e., hydrofluorosilicic acid and sodium fluorosilicate). Silicofluorides are not pharmaceutical-grade fluoride products; they are unnprocessed
industrial by-products (toxic wastes) of the phosphate fertilizer industry.

Since these silicofluorides undergo no purification procedures, they can contain elevated levels of arsenic — more so than any other water treatment chemical. In addition, recent research suggests that the addition of silicofluorides to water is a risk factor for elevated Lead exposure, particularly among residents who live in homes with older pipes.
 

wastwater

Senior Member
Messages
1,267
Location
uk
I have quite a bit of hip pain,sometimes femur too,seems to get better if I have milk.
 

PatJ

Forum Support Assistant
Messages
5,288
Location
Canada
A couple of months ago I tried 2,000 IU of D3 per day for a week, then 8,000 IU of D3 per day for a few days (along with a vitamin K complex for better absorption). After two days my bones started to ache. Could this be a sign that my bones were finally getting what they need, such as taking in more calcium due to the supplemented vitamin D?

I found an answer to my question here, at a very useful site for vitamin D and cofactor information.
When a person with somewhat spongy bones takes vitamin d, it allows your body to absorb calcium quickly -- and with that calcium fluids go into the bones too, just like a sponge. And when this happens, it actually can make your bones swell against the outer covering of your bones. And because this outer covering of your bones is not flexible, you can experience this swelling as pain.