Pacing with a Heart Rate Monitor

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Hi everyone :)

Alice - I've added you to the group.

My own thoughts on drinking water is that our body has to work harder when we consume something colder. That might be nonsense but I'm sure I read something about athletes being discouraged from taking onboard fluids that were chilled for that reason.

The formula for calculating AT is far from perfect, I acknowledge that. The only 'ideal' way is to be properly tested but that costs money. I'm finding that the more I come to learn about how my heart rate influences how I feel at the time (and afterwards) the more I can be pragmatic about when to stop what I'm doing. For example, I know that if I let my heart rate get to 140 I am going to be forced to lay flat for around 20 minutes to get it back down to acceptable levels. Conversely, I have come to realise that letting it go above my AT (109) for a minute or so whilst I walk around isn't going to cause me any future problems.

I'm still thinking about how to make the group as useful as possible for everyone. At the minute, we have a good collection of articles/research materials and we have the benefit of user experiences from those of us who are already up and running. I was thinking a regular diary would be a good feature so others could pick up tips along the way so that might be an option in the near future. Also, I think the question invariably turns to "what next?" once we learn to live alongside using a heart rate monitor. To that end, I'm thinking of devising a standardised routine that can act as a guide for me to measure progress/deteriation and to try to identify patterns in terms of what I can and cannot do on 'good' or 'bad' days. Work in progress.

Take care everyone :)
OnlyResting-
It seems like the AT calculation formula is a good general guideline as a place to start, and then to modify as our own unique physiological characteristics warrant. I can barely leave the house right now for doctor appointments and lab tests; getting any kind of tests would be overwhelming to me right now, the AT calculation is definitely preferable for me.
I like your idea of devising a standardized routine. That's what I'm trying to figure out, too. Something that works within my schedule and capabilities right now, but allows me to tract progress (hopefully) in an objective manner.
 
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Oh, almost forgot.....

I don't want to say to you all "don't wory about radiation/EMFs" as we all have to make our own judgement calls on risks. I would like to say though that the levels are very small. I did a bit of digging around on this subject a while back and found that other household devices were giving off much higher levels. As an example, my BlackBerry gives off massively more than my HRM.
OnlyResting-
I suspect you're right that the risks are relatively small given the stuff we're exposed to pretty constantly, but I'd sure like to see some research on the matter. I bought this thingy that you attach to your cell phone that's supposed to divert the EMF's away from the head for my husband and son's cell phones. I suppose if I get too paranoid I can buy one of those for this monitor.
 
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Hi Only,

Thanks for your thoughts.

I'm always pleased when I hear my experience lines up with others. I've tried drinking room temperature water and basically the same thing happens - maybe I should try warm and see what happens.

Do others notice their heart rate drops when eating? Is this common?
Shannah-
I hate the flavor of water and have to drink lots of it for the medicines I'm taking, so I tend to chug it down. I've noticed that when I drink it more slowly and take breaks while drinking I can control my heart rate better.
I haven't really paid attention to the eating part but that may be because I'm paying more attention to what drives the heart rate up than what brings it down right now. I have noticed that when my blood sugar level rises from eating too much junk food my heart rate rises.
 
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I couldn't agree more, Helen :)

Armed with the knowledge the HRM is giving us, combined with the after-effects in terms of symptoms, we would be foolish to keep pushing. Like you, I have split even the most basic task into little chunks. Everything takes so long as a result (and I'm not the most patient person) but I've seen the benefits of this approach for myself now.... so, I go with it.
OnlyResting and Helen41-
I haven't yet tried the monitor in public but suspect I'll try turning off the alarm and just looking at it frequently.
I agree with you both that pacing and patience is key to the monitor helping us out. I am by nature a slow, patient person, and have a real difficult time pacing myself at the rate I need to go based on the monitor. I can't imagine how much more difficult this would be if I were more of a Type A personality.
 

Sallysblooms

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Alice z, I just received my new strapless monitor this morning It does not constrict. I put two fingers on it for the heart rate. I don't want to wear the one with the strap all day in case it isn 't good to do that. I have been doing it for months though. I will wear when I need to though. That monitor has been great.
 
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Alice z, I just received my new strapless monitor this morning It does not constrict. I put two fingers on it for the heart rate. I don't want to wear the one with the strap all day in case it isn 't good to do that. I have been doing it for months though. I will wear when I need to though. That monitor has been great.
Sallysblooms-
What is it called? Have you noticed whether it's accurate if your hand is cold? I have this biofeedback game that uses finger receptors to measure pulse and heart rate and I sometimes have a hard time getting it to pick anything up, as I have poor circulation and tend to have cold fingers.
 

Sallysblooms

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My new one is called Health Smart brand. I have tested it for accuracy against my other monitor with the strap and my blood pressure monitor. It does a great job. I had read that they less accurate but I have not found that to be true. It does work for me so I din't have to wear the strap. If I go out where I have do walk more I wear the strap because it is always giving you the number. I like having both. This new one is much prettier too.
 
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I just got my Polar F7 (?). I'm trying to figure out my AT. With the formula its only 88 which like someone else said means I'm over it when I stand up.

Is there an updated formula?

Great thread! I also asked to join the group on facebook.
 

slayadragon

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I have also noticed the connection between drinking water and heart rate with the monitor, which I had never noticed before getting the monitor, Shannah.
Would those people who find a connection between drinking water (or washing their hands with water!) be willing to do an experiment where they try drinking a "good" brand of bottled water, or distilled water, to see if the heartbeat rate goes up?

Perhaps the increase in heartbeat rate is due to contamination of the water. If that's what's happening, switching to some other kind of water might be worthwhile.

Please let me know if you figure out anything!

Thanks, Lisa
 

shannah

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Would those people who find a connection between drinking water (or washing their hands with water!) be willing to do an experiment where they try drinking a "good" brand of bottled water, or distilled water, to see if the heartbeat rate goes up?

Perhaps the increase in heartbeat rate is due to contamination of the water. If that's what's happening, switching to some other kind of water might be worthwhile.

Please let me know if you figure out anything!

Thanks, Lisa

Hi Lisa,

I only drink purchased reverse osmosis water. It usually measures 0 with a TDS meter whereas both tap water and bottled water measure somewhere around 200 and up. I made my own colloidal silver back a few months ago so had to know the measurements of the various kinds of water.

Also, HR still increases whether it's cold or room temperature. Thought maybe it could possible have something to do with not breathing as you're drinking the water, but still rises taking small mouthfuls with breaks or chugging a few gulps at a time. Wierd!
 

slayadragon

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Hi Lisa,

I only drink purchased reverse osmosis water. It usually measures 0 with a TDS meter whereas both tap water and bottled water measure somewhere around 200 and up. I made my own colloidal silver back a few months ago so had to know the measurements of the various kinds of water.

Also, HR still increases whether it's cold or room temperature. Thought maybe it could possible have something to do with not breathing as you're drinking the water, but still rises taking small mouthfuls with breaks or chugging a few gulps at a time. Wierd!
Would you be willing to humor me and experiment with drinking different waters to see if your heartbeat increases with all of them?

I'm thinking about chemical toxins in the water, and in particular those made by toxic cyanobacteria.

http://www.HABlegislation.com/system/files/FreshwaterReport_final_2008.pdf

In reading the descriptions of reverse osmosis water, it seems to me that the toxins might be able to make it through the process into the finished water.

I'm very sensitive to these kinds of biotoxins and got very sick this summer from drinking some tainted water. So I'm interested in whether other people might be too.

Thanks for your help.

Best, Lisa
 

shannah

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Well I just drank some distilled water Lisa and HR went from 85 to 107 in a few seconds then dropped back down again.
 

shannah

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I was reading about how Co Q10 was supposed to help high blood pressure so took some yesterday and again today. I haven't taken my blood pressure yet but HR has lowered a little and seems a little more stable than what it has been lately.
 

slayadragon

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Well I just drank some distilled water Lisa and HR went from 85 to 107 in a few seconds then dropped back down again.
Thanks for doing that. So I still wonder why drinking water (at least for some people) would make the heart rate go up when eating does not.

This may have been talked about on the Facebook site (which I have yet to peruse), but does this seem applicable in general for the testing of how we react to different substances (e.g. like Cheney does with his Echo Terrain Mapping machine)?

I spent some time doing pulse tests of various foods, and found them to be far more useful at finding my food sensitivities than any kind of lab tests. Having the heart rate monitor doing this automatically (rather than having to get out the blood pressure cuff or take my pulse) could be even more informative, I would think.

I'd like to hear about other things that seem to make the heart rate go up, or that make it go up under some circumstances but not others.

This would be a much better investment than spending $10k for an office visit with Cheney, if it ended up doing the same thing, I would think.

:)

Best, Lisa
 

Sallysblooms

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Shannah, supplements can take a while to help, they don't usually help bp, etc, right after you take them. They have to begin to replenish when they are needed.
 
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Thanks for doing that. So I still wonder why drinking water (at least for some people) would make the heart rate go up when eating does not.

This may have been talked about on the Facebook site (which I have yet to peruse), but does this seem applicable in general for the testing of how we react to different substances (e.g. like Cheney does with his Echo Terrain Mapping machine)?

I spent some time doing pulse tests of various foods, and found them to be far more useful at finding my food sensitivities than any kind of lab tests. Having the heart rate monitor doing this automatically (rather than having to get out the blood pressure cuff or take my pulse) could be even more informative, I would think.

I'd like to hear about other things that seem to make the heart rate go up, or that make it go up under some circumstances but not others.

This would be a much better investment than spending $10k for an office visit with Cheney, if it ended up doing the same thing, I would think.

:)

Best, Lisa
Hi Lisa,

I agree that there is a world of small-scale personal research we can do alongside using a heart rate monitor and it's one of the things I want to focus on once the basics of the Facebook group are settled. Very interesting potential.
 

shannah

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Shannah, supplements can take a while to help, they don't usually help bp, etc, right after you take them. They have to begin to replenish when they are needed.
I'm only reporting what I've experienced. One thing I've come to learn is that we are a strange lot indeed with our hyper sensitivities, reverse reactions, anomalies that don't make sense, previously unheard of responses, etc., etc.
 

Sallysblooms

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Strange indeed, I have POTS to boot so I know what you are talking about. Supplements have been fantastic for me. Some take a while to work, but not usually too long, especially when we are missing the nutrient.
 

slayadragon

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I tried looking through this thread and then at different monitors on Amazon, but I'm still confused.

What features should I be looking for? It seems like one that has the ability to work with a chest strap (for continuous monitoring) and on its own (for one touch readings), but I'm not totally sure that's right. And I don't know if there are others features that matter. (I don't think I'm interested in the pedometer.)

Has anyone found a brand they particularly like?

One thing is that I'm very small -boned and really need something small. And preferably attractive.

Thanks for any suggestions folks might be able to provide.

Best, Lisa
 

Sallysblooms

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I like having boh. Wearing the strap gets old all day but continuous readings are great when you need that. I do most of the time. I have an Omron.

My strapless one is a Health Smart. You touch it with two fingers for the reading. It looks better than my Omron. Niceto have when go out to dinner etc. It is a small one too.