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Nutritional Ketosis and Mitohormesis: Potential Implications for Mitochondrial Function and Health

nanonug

Senior Member
Messages
1,709
Location
Virginia, USA
(This is a beautiful review article extolling the virtues of the ketogenic diet)

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5828461/

Abstract
Impaired mitochondrial function often results in excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and is involved in the etiology of many chronic diseases, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, neurodegenerative disorders, and cancer. Moderate levels of mitochondrial ROS, however, can protect against chronic disease by inducing upregulation of mitochondrial capacity and endogenous antioxidant defense. This phenomenon, referred to as mitohormesis, is induced through increased reliance on mitochondrial respiration, which can occur through diet or exercise. Nutritional ketosis is a safe and physiological metabolic state induced through a ketogenic diet low in carbohydrate and moderate in protein. Such a diet increases reliance on mitochondrial respiration and may, therefore, induce mitohormesis. Furthermore, the ketone β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), which is elevated during nutritional ketosis to levels no greater than those resulting from fasting, acts as a signaling molecule in addition to its traditionally known role as an energy substrate. BHB signaling induces adaptations similar to mitohormesis, thereby expanding the potential benefit of nutritional ketosis beyond carbohydrate restriction. This review describes the evidence supporting enhancement of mitochondrial function and endogenous antioxidant defense in response to nutritional ketosis, as well as the potential mechanisms leading to these adaptations.
 

Wishful

Senior Member
Messages
5,657
Location
Alberta
Interesting article, but I tried a keto diet and it made my symptoms worse. Also, my response to antioxidants and peroxynitrite scavengers seems to imply that I have too little ROS formation, or it's being broken down at the wrong time or place. As the article states, ROS have critical roles to play at the correct levels. I expect they play a role in the positive feedback loop of ME.
 

Wishful

Senior Member
Messages
5,657
Location
Alberta
I forget. A few weeks? Maybe a month or two? I'm not sure that I had enough fat for the protein content (not trivial to measure), but it didn't convince me that more fat would have made me feel better rather than worse. Since I seem to have opposite reactions to other things other people claim helps them, and react to other things that other people don't mention, I'm not too surprised at my reaction to a keto diet. Not that there's actually a 'standard ME/CFS' to compare myself to.