NIH Conference: "Beyond the Symptom: The Biology of Fatigue" September 27 - 28, 2021

Pyrrhus

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There is an upcoming NIH Conference:

"Beyond the Symptom: The Biology of Fatigue"
September 27 - 28, 2021
https://web.cvent.com/event/4630788...sitePage:645d57e4-75eb-4769-b2c0-f201a0bfc6ce

Agenda
September 27-28, 2021

DAY 1: September 27, 2021
10:00 – 10:10 am Introductions and Welcome – Vicky Whittemore, PhD, NIH/NINDS and H. Craig Heller, PhD, Stanford
University & Sleep Research Society
10:10 – 10:20 am Goals of the Workshop – David Raizen, MD, PhD (University of Pennsylvania)

SESSION 1: Fatigue in the Setting of Disease
Moderators: Erin Gibson, PhD (Stanford University) and Anthony L. Komaroff, MD (Harvard Medical School)
10:20 – 10:40 am Acute to Chronic Infection - Josh Fessel, MD, PhD (NIH/NHLBI)
10:40 – 11:00 am Post-Cancer Treatment Fatigue – Leorey Saligan, PhD (NIH/NINR)
11:00 – 11:20 am Autoimmune Disorders – Lauren Krupp, MD (New York University)
11:20 – 11:40 am Exercise-induced Fatigue and Recovery – H. Craig Heller, PhD (Stanford University & Sleep
Research Society)

11:40 – 11:55 am Break

11:55 am – 12:15 pm ME/CFS – Betsy Keller, PhD (Ithaca College)
12:15 – 12:35 pm Altered Sensory (Proprioception, Vision and Audition) Processing: A Possible Common
Mechanism of Chronic Fatigue in Nurological Diseases - Anna Kuppuswamy, PhD
(University College London)
12:35 – 12:55 pm Sleep Disruption/Fragmentation – Phyllis Zee, MD, PhD (Northwestern University)
12:55 – 1:30 pm Session 1: Discussion

1:30 – 2:00 pm Break

SESSION 2: Theories for Mechanisms of Fatigue
Moderators: Nancy Klimas, MD (Nova Southeastern University) and Avindra Nath, MD (NIH/NINDS)
2:00 – 2:20 pm Brain->Immune Interactions - Asya Rolls, PhD (Technion – Israel Institute of Technology)
2:20 – 2:40 pm Immunomodulators as Regulators of Sleep and Fatigue - Mark Opp, PhD (University of Colorado)
2:40 – 3:00 pm Inflammation Effects on the Brain and Behavior: Relevance to Fatigue – Andrew H. Miller, PhD
(Emory School of Medicine)
3:00 – 3:20 pm Immune Dysfunction in ME/CFS - Maureen Hanson, PhD (Cornell University)
3:20 – 3:40 pm Molecular and Cellular Biology in ME/CFS – W. Ian Lipkin, MD (Columbia University)

3:40 – 3:55 pm Break

3:55 – 4:15 pm The Role of the Metabolic Trap in Fatigue - Ron Davis, PhD (Stanford University)
4:15 – 4:35 pm Neuron-glia Metabolic Coupling: Roles in Plasticity and Pathology - Pierre Magistretti, MD, PhD
(King Abdullah University of Science and Technology)
4:35 – 4:55 pm Gut-brain Axis – Gerard Clarke, PhD (University of Cork)
4:55 – 5:15 pm Reactive Oxygen Species in the Brain and in the Periphery - Dragona Ragulja, PhD (Harvard University)
5:15 – 5:35 pm Circadian Misalignment- Beth Klerman, MD, PhD (Harvard University)
5:35– 6:00 pm Session 2: Discussion

DAY 2 – September 28, 2021
10:00 – 10:10 am Introduction to Day 2 – Janet Mullington, PhD (Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center & Harvard
Medical School)
10:10 – 10:25 am Comments from NINDS Director – Walter Koroshetz, MD (NIH/NINDS)

SESSION 3: Approaches to Study Fatigue
Moderator: Mary Harrington, PhD (Smith College)
10:25 – 10:55 pm Omics in Human Disease - Ron Tompkins, MD (Massachusetts General Hospital)
10:55 – 11:15 am GWAS: Use of the UKBB for Genetic Discovery – Richa Saxena, PhD (Massachusetts General Hospital
Center for Genomic Medicine)
11:15 – 11:25 am Use of EHR for Understanding Disease - Marilyn Richie, PhD (University of Pennsylvania)
11:25 – 11:45 am Electroencephalography of Non-refreshing Sleep – Janet Mullington, PhD (Beth Israel Deaconess
Medical Center & Harvard Medical School)

11:45 am – 12:00 pm Break

Models for Studying Fatigue
12:00 – 12:25 pm Approaches to Study the Biology of Fatigue in Preclinical Models - Robert Dantzer, DVM, PhD
(The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center)
12:25 – 12:45 pm Use of LPS to Model Human Fatigue – Julie Lasselin, PhD (Stockholm University)
12:45 – 1:05 pm Pharmacology of Fatigue Behavior in Rodents - John Salamone, PhD (University of Connecticut)
1:05 – 1:25 pm Studying Hibernation Biology to Gain Insights into Fatigue – Kelly Drew, PhD (University of Alaska)
1:25 – 1:45 pm Studying Fatigued Behavior in Invertebrates - David Raizen, MD (University of Pennsylvania)
1:45 – 2:05 pm Session 3: Discussion

2:05 – 2:20 pm Break

SESSION 4: Neurobiology of Fatigue
Moderator: Cliff Saper, MD, PhD (Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center & Harvard University)
2:20 – 2:40 pm Neuroimaging: PET, fMRI, MRS - Jarred Younger, PhD (University of Alabama at Birmingham)
2:40 – 3:00 pm Psychomotor Slowing – Professor Hugo Critchley (University of Sussex)
3:00 – 3:20 pm Evidence for a Network of Fatigue-Related Areas in the Brain – Glenn Wylie, DPhil
(Kessler Foundation)
3:20 – 3:40 pm Hypothalamus – Patrick Fuller, PhD (University of California, Davis)
3:40 – 4:00 pm The Role of the Brainstem in Slow-Wave-Sleep Control – Christelle Anaclet, PhD (University
of Massachusetts)

4:00 – 4:15 pm Break

4:15 – 4:35 pm Role of Glympathics in Sleep and Fatigue – Maiken Nedergaard, MD, DMSc (University of Rochester
Medical Center)
4:35 – 4:55 PM CSF Flow and Slow Wave Oscillations During Sleep – Laura Lewis, PhD (Boston University)
4:55 – 5:25 PM Session 4: Discussion

5:25 – 6:00 pm Workshop Wrap-up
 

Boba

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@crepant Proprioception will be discussed as well

12:15 – 12:35 pm Altered Sensory (Proprioception, Vision and Audition) Processing: A Possible Common
Mechanism of Chronic Fatigue in Nurological Diseases - Anna Kuppuswamy, PhD
(University College London
 

SWAlexander

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ooooooo, this is a good one.

The Biology of Fatigue, I hope they have some answers. This was one of the first topics I researched, never found a good answer. Posted this over a year ago, the dumber version of myself did. And yet I know nothing more about it now than I did then - https://forums.phoenixrising.me/threads/direct-causes-of-fatigue-in-cfs.80467/
It is a big puzzle and I´m also waiting for a pinpointed answer. Even science finds an answer, we will have another problem. Who is instructing doctors to acknowledge ME/CFS and order the right tests?
 

Woof!

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As a conference speaker and guest lecturer for many years, I'm disappointed each segment is allotted only 20 minutes. Good grief! That amounts to a quick introduction, a 10-minute synopsis and a few minutes to post references attendees can access to learn more.

Okay for a bunch of post-grads looking for a quickie way to get speaker creds, but not the best way for attendees to learn more about fatigue!
 

junkcrap50

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Looks like some good mix of speakers. I know it's from the NIH, but I can't tell if it's a ME/CFS conference with invited outside-of-Me/CFS / mainstream specialists; or a general fatigue conference of mainstream researchers that invited several ME/CFS researchers. Hopefully there's some good cross pollination of ideas & knowledge.
 

wabi-sabi

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Today was another fascinating day! I missed some of the afternoon sessions unfortunately, but made it back for the final discussion.

One of the scientists asked NIH if they were putting out more funding for ME/CFS research. The answer was no, we already have that AND this conference isn't about ME/CFS anyway, it's about fatigue. Now I'm just crushed instead of inspired.

At least that's what I thought I heard in my brain inflamed state. Anyone else hear the same?
 
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The answer was no, we already have that AND this conference isn't about ME/CFS anyway, it's about fatigue. Now I'm just crushed instead of inspired.
I didn't hear it, but don' t we have some BIG Chunks of Change right now? Which may be what they mean by "already" have that....

What we seem to be unable to explain is who is getting that funding, when will our researchers be successful in getting some of it. (as opposed to receiving "idiotic" comments from the peer reviewers, I presume)....

Meanwhile, I think I saw a slide from the conference earlier and the main term used was TIRED.

did any of us nap today? I doubt it.
 

wabi-sabi

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One suggestion I liked from one of the researchers at the end was to take all these people with fatigue-depression, cancer, ME/CFS, strokes-and give them the same tests. That way we could see if what was going on in our bodies was similar or different.

This sounded really sensible to me! I would love for all these types to get the 2 day CPET. That would be really illuminating.
 

RYO

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As I was watching one of the researchers discuss murine studies of fatigue as it relates to cancer, the thought occurred to me that perhaps a researcher could take the plasma or some plasma isolate from MECFS patients and inject it into mice to study it’s effects.

This would test the theory that there is an unknown factor in the blood of MECFS patients (ie exosomes) as suggested by Ron Davis’s nanoneedle study.
 

BrightCandle

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As I was watching one of the researchers discuss murine studies of fatigue as it relates to cancer, the thought occurred to me that perhaps a researcher could take the plasma or some plasma isolate from MECFS patients and inject it into mice to study it’s effects.
It has been shown in vitro with human cells so we know the plasma carries something that is causing cells to shut down and behave differently. Not sure that injecting mice/rats necessarily adds much because if they don't develop ME/CFS it doesn't say much, if they do it might inform the possible factors at best.
 
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One suggestion I liked from one of the researchers at the end was to take all these people with fatigue-depression, cancer, ME/CFS, strokes-and give them the same tests. That way we could see if what was going on in our bodies was similar or different.
It was therefore interesting that the new OMF publication, presents data showing no overlap between the Severely ill patient cohort and depression.

Im a bit vague on what that data is, but it seems to show something. And differences with the general CFS patients as well. I need to read some more of that for further clarity.
 

SWAlexander

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On September 27-28, 2021 NIH will host a virtual workshop intitled Beyond the Symptom: Biology of Fatigue to bring together individuals who do research on fatigue, health care providers who see patients with fatigue, and individuals who have fatigue and patient advocates. This workshop is a joint workshop of the NIH Blueprint Neuroscience Research Program and the Sleep Research Society.
https://videocast.nih.gov/watch=42565