New EBV drugs in the pipeline!

hixxy

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It'll be extremely expensive for at least 20 years and likely not approved for ME/CFS so unlikely to be subsidised in countries that have subsidised drug services.
 

heapsreal

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Ive posted about this guy previously and there is an article of how he put an ms patient into remission. Probably didnt get many views as a certain dr didnt believe ebv had anything to do with ms and basically shut down much debate on the thread or any thread that didnt fit his agenda.

https://msra.org.au/project/immune-control-of-epstein-barr-virus-in-ms/
 

shannah

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Ive posted about this guy previously and there is an article of how he put an ms patient into remission. Probably didnt get many views as a certain dr didnt believe ebv had anything to do with ms and basically shut down much debate on the thread or any thread that didnt fit his agenda.

https://msra.org.au/project/immune-control-of-epstein-barr-virus-in-ms/

Some interesting excerpts from the link you gave @heapsreal ...


"A large body of evidence indicates that infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has a role in MS. Prof Pender has shown that people with MS have decreased immunity to EBV which could allow the accumulation of EBV-infected cells in the brain and the subsequent development of MS. This project will look at specific immune cells involved with the response to EBV infection known as CD8 T cells."

"Professor Pender has also examined blood samples from a large number of people with all forms of MS including the earliest signs of MS, known as Clinically Isolated Syndrome (CIS). The CD8 effector memory cell deficiency is present in all of these stages and types of the disease, including the very earliest stage, CIS, suggesting that is a cause, rather than a consequence, of the disease. He has also shown that other T cell types are also decreased over the course of disease, contributing to overall T cell exhaustion."

"An exciting development in this direction was revealed earlier this year, when Professor Pender and his colleagues published the promising results for a patient with secondary progressive MS who was treated with CD8 cells primed to recognise EBV. The therapy had no adverse effects and the patient showed clinical improvement with reduced disease activity. This is the first time that this type of therapy, known as adoptive immunotherapy, has been used to treat MS or any other autoimmune disease. Professor Pender and colleagues are now planning to undertake a phase I clinical trial of the therapy."

Updated: 13 April 2015
PROFESSOR MICHAEL PENDER
UNIVERSITY OF QUEENSLAND, QLD

https://msra.org.au/project/immune-control-of-epstein-barr-virus-in-ms/

Pender has published extensively and is still very actively building on his research:
https://researchers.uq.edu.au/researcher/321



Ron Davis mentioned in his latest brief video this week that his team will be looking at the T-cell activation in ME.


Could there be something in Pender's work of interest in ME?
I wonder if Ron is aware of Pender's research with MS in Australia.

@Janet Dafoe (Rose49)
 

heapsreal

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Some interesting excerpts from the link you gave @heapsreal ...


"A large body of evidence indicates that infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has a role in MS. Prof Pender has shown that people with MS have decreased immunity to EBV which could allow the accumulation of EBV-infected cells in the brain and the subsequent development of MS. This project will look at specific immune cells involved with the response to EBV infection known as CD8 T cells."

"Professor Pender has also examined blood samples from a large number of people with all forms of MS including the earliest signs of MS, known as Clinically Isolated Syndrome (CIS). The CD8 effector memory cell deficiency is present in all of these stages and types of the disease, including the very earliest stage, CIS, suggesting that is a cause, rather than a consequence, of the disease. He has also shown that other T cell types are also decreased over the course of disease, contributing to overall T cell exhaustion."

"An exciting development in this direction was revealed earlier this year, when Professor Pender and his colleagues published the promising results for a patient with secondary progressive MS who was treated with CD8 cells primed to recognise EBV. The therapy had no adverse effects and the patient showed clinical improvement with reduced disease activity. This is the first time that this type of therapy, known as adoptive immunotherapy, has been used to treat MS or any other autoimmune disease. Professor Pender and colleagues are now planning to undertake a phase I clinical trial of the therapy."

Updated: 13 April 2015
PROFESSOR MICHAEL PENDER
UNIVERSITY OF QUEENSLAND, QLD

https://msra.org.au/project/immune-control-of-epstein-barr-virus-in-ms/

Pender has published extensively and is still very actively building on his research:
https://researchers.uq.edu.au/researcher/321



Ron Davis mentioned in his latest brief video this week that his team will be looking at the T-cell activation in ME.


Could there be something in Pender's work of interest in ME?
I wonder if Ron is aware of Pender's research with MS in Australia.

@Janet Dafoe (Rose49)
One of the nk function studies done by griffith university cfs researchers also showed cd8 t cell function was poor, even though the cd8 numbers were fine. I think its called a functional deficiency and its possible going by this research that we have this functional deficiency in nk cells and cd8 cells.
 

Wally

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https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/879140
For the current study, the researchers isolated T cells from patients with MS and grew them in the laboratory with fragments of Epstein-Barr virus in the hope of expanding the number of T cells able to attack B cells infected with the virus. The cells are then readministered to the patients as a course of four dose-escalating injections over a 6-week period. Dr Pender noted that this approach has been used to treat certain malignancies also thought be associated with Epstein-Barr virus.
This article explains how T-Cell therapy (discussed in the article posted by @heapsreal) was used without relying on a drug treatment. Not sure how expensive or practical this type of therapy might be, but I like the idea of not needing to rely on a drug to see if this approach would work as a potential treatment.
 

Daffodil

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@Wally it was always my understanding that Cher went to an expensive German clinic every 6 months for some kind of similar EBV immunotherapy for CFS....

I did contact Prof. Pender who forwarded my email to someone at Atara. They are aware of possible application of their research to ME/CFS but they are a small company and at the moment, are focusing on proving their case with MS.

Maybe the same drug would work for ME/CFS? One researcher long ago told me our illness is similar to MS...like basically the same thing but a different version or something...
 

Wally

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@Daffodil - Some in the ME research world are already looking into whether a trial like Prof. Pender has done in Australia can be duplicated in ME patients. What I liked about the Pender study is that the concept can first be tested without needing to create or re-purpose a drug in order to see if a similar result result would happen in ME. Atara or another pharma company would probably be much more interested in pursuing a drug treatment trial, if they were first presented with data for ME patients like seen with MS. Fingers crossed that such a trial does end up happening.
 
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