Neural stimulation technology to reach the LC via the vagus.

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This may interest some who have sensory hyper sensitivities as part of their picture.
Sounds like he's looking at non invasive stimulation to target the deeper brain structures.
"Wang's research has long been focused on the locus coeruleus (LC), which plays a pivotal role in modulating brain functions through its regulation of arousal levels. The LC is the primary source of norepinephrine (NE) and scientists think that decreases in NE levels in the brain when the LC is damaged may underlie many neuropsychiatric disorders and neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's, ADHD, schizophrenia, autism, and depression. But because the LC is so small and located so deeply within the brainstem, it has been a major challenge to access it safely and to manipulate its activity."
https://eurekalert.org/pub_releases...8r7cy2rRdkqWv7W-1cNvGOkCWZejbnTokTrTnq_CJ-Anw
 

Sidny

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Excellent post, thank you. While my illness started with sensory hypersensitivity it has shifted to sensory loss and seeing as how the LC is central to so many processes I’m sure some sort of injury there is playing a role in me.

I think damage to the area fits in line with Van Elzakkers theory on brain stem dysfunction quite well.

I wonder if there are other ways to stimulate it or induce nuerogenisis there?
I read a few papers on it, seems like it’s implicated in most major neurodegenerative diseases and depression. I practically lost my fight or flight/startle response and it’s intresting to read this area of the brain plays a central role in that process.

Here are a couple good links for more info on the LC

“Uptake of environmental toxicants by the locus ceruleus: A potential trigger for neurodegenerative, demyelinating and psychiatric disorders”

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0306987713005434

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Locus_coeruleus
 
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Transcutaneous auricular vagal nerve stimulation apparently activates the LC via the nucleus tractus solitaries.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27898202
I have been using t-vns and same as other interventions that supports vagal tone I do notice some general improvement, but who knows if it's manipulating the LC's activity in any significant way! :) It will be interesting to see what kind of stimulation this researcher proposes might be effective.
 

Hip

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It's interesting how some ME/CFS patients, as well as those with autism or ADHD, can get substantially better during the time they have a fever (from a cold).

This so called "fever effect" is thought to be driven by locus coeruleus (LC) activation, as the LC is responsible for controlling fever.