NCF funds research on cyanobacteria and Agrobacterium and its molecular basis

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Alan Cocchetto's submission to co-cure was posted Dec 13 09

I have so much catching up to do. I've never heard of this group.

National CFIDS Foundation Adds to its Innovative Research Grant Funding for 2009
Press Release - December 11, 2009

The National CFIDS Foundation (NCF) of Needham, MA has announced its latest research grant recipient to add to its growing list of funded projects which total $ 451,160 for 2009.

Vitaly Citovsky, Ph.D., Professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Cell Biology at SUNY Stony Brook, is the latest recipient of a research grant for $ 105,000 from the NCF. Citovsky's grant is titled Potential synergism between cyanobacteria and Agrobacterium and its molecular basis.

According to Alan Cocchetto, NCF's Medical Director, This research is aimed at determining if there is a synergistic relationship between two very unique bacteria. It may be possible for agrobacterium to develop a symbiotic relationship with cyanobacteria within the human microbiome, ultimately enhancing the cyanobacteria's pathogenicity and to aggravate the medical condition of the host. This is important since agrobacterium is known to genetically transform human cells. Furthermore, this research will complement the toxicology work currently underway by Harry Davis, Ph.D. and his team at the University of Hawaii on ciguatera and cyanobacteria and how they relate to CFIDS/ME.

Gail Kansky, NCF's President stated 2009 has been a terrific year for the Foundation. Through the hard work of dedicated volunteers along with generous donations from patients and benefactors, we have been able to provide directed funding to some truly outstanding researchers worldwide in an effort to conquer this disease. 2009 represents our largest funding year ever since the Foundation first began its formal research grant program in 2002. We have made tremendous strides in our knowledge of this disease. These grants reflect our efforts to build upon our previous research in a step-by-step fashion to connect all the scientific and medical dots relating to CFIDS/ME. The NCF represents what a true charity should be as there are no paid employees and our donations go to fund innovative research projects. We look forward to 2010 because the results of this research should provide much hope to millions of patients around the globe.

Founded in 1997, the goals of the NCF are to help fund medical research to find a cause, expedite treatments and eventually a cure for CFIDS/ME. The NCF is funded solely by individual contributions. Additional information can be found on our website at www.ncf-net.org and in The National Forum quarterly newsletter. The NCF can be reached by phone at 781-449-3535
 

alicec

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I just got back my ubiome results and cyanobacteria is listed as one of the unusual flora.....Is this something I should pursue? @alicec
Cyanobacteria are one of the minor phyla present in the gut at low levels in some individuals. They are normal gut constituents.

Like many of the minor phyla constituents, not much is known about function in the gut. Here is a study.
 

alicec

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What is ubiome?
I have never heard of it.
uBiome (the u is really the greek letter mu, short for micro) is a SanFrancisco based company which identifies human microbiome constituents by DNA sequencing. It started out as a citizen scientist type project whereby anyone can order tests and be given the results to interpret themselves.

More recently they have added a couple of more specific tests where interpretation is offered, but these must be ordered through a doctor and results are sent to the doctor.
 

wastwater

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Was just looking at cyanobacteria found in lakes it makes BMAA replacing l serine causing misfolded proteins
 

S-VV

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I have a hunch that agrobacterium, used to genetically modify plants, will be proven to play a bigger role in chronic disease than was suspected.

Not too long ago, there was "no evidence" of horizontal gene transfer from agrobacterium to human cells. Now there is.

However, decades will have to pass before any of it's damaging effects will be recognized. Just imagine all the lawsuits against Monsanto & co.