Moving to the U.S. 90% likely, where would you live?

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Where would you live (U.S.) if you could choose? It’s a broad question, I suppose I’m asking from an ME/CFS, hEDS, dysautonomia, and overall healthcare standpoint. I may be moving (90% likely) to the U.S. next year. I am coming from a small town in France. One of the things I would be looking forward to are increased health resources and doctors. Looking forward to hearing from anyone.
 

bensmith

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Northern california has some decent doctors and is pretty and nice. Utah has some too and is also pretty. Utah has some odd culture though.

new orleans has french culture but prob not a good idea to move there with climate change, plus likely not great medical care.
 
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geraldt52

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...One of the things I would be looking forward to are increased health resources and doctors...
I'm sorry, but a lot of us who have lived in the U.S. all our lives would find that concept laughable...from a general standpoint, and even more specifically from a ME/CFS standpoint.

Unless you're somehow entitled to some first class health insurance in the U.S., expect any health care you get to be incredibly expensive, especially from the vast majority of the so-called "CFS specialists". Don't move anywhere until you have this figured out...
 

Mary

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Unless you're somehow entitled to some first class health insurance in the U.S., expect any health care you get to be incredibly expensive, especially from the vast majority of the so-called "CFS specialists". Don't move anywhere until you have this figured out...
I agree. Good health care insurance is expensive and in my experience most ME/CFS "specialists" won't take insurance anyways. So odds are you'd be paying out-of-pocket for health care, which can be very expensive.

I'd avoid California in general (even though I like California overall and live in southern California!) Housing is very expensive, and we've had several years of drought, so some horrific wildfires. There are more affordable areas in the U.S. with access to decent health care - and other PR members could hopefully give you some tips about that.
 

SWAlexander

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Unless you are or become a federal Employee private health insurance can be a real problem. Suggest you inform yourself of the details. California has HMOs (Kaiser Permanente) - or you check out The Blue Cross and Blue and others. You may pay attention to possible very high co-pays. I lived in CA and NM. You find better doctors and uni-clinics in CA, but rent in CA is outrageous.
 

5vforest

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The only good thing about being in the US is that you have "freedom" to choose your medical care. However, if you have ME/CFS, you are probably going to pay for everything out of pocket, with the possible exception of medications that might be covered by insurance.

It probably doesn't matter too much where you live, unless you have a specific doctor(s) that you want to see.

Aside from individual doctors, any major city should be more or less the same, I would think.
 

bensmith

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honestly its prob just better to find someplace you enjoy. I dont think a doctor can make much difference. But thats my opinion, maybe you can get help. But like others have said, it will be very very expensive and out of pocket. I hate that tney do this, its so wrong.
 
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Hi,
I would move somewhere that you have the most social supports already available to make a smoother transition and avoid isolation which can happen even to a healthy person moving to a new place. I would look for places with the least weather changes, if you google about best places to live with migraine that is a place to start, good migraine places tend to have less severe weather changes. Climate, are you ok with dry or moist, do you want water nearby or are you ok landlocked? I feel like the east coast gives one more options as far as healthcare, things are not so spread out making it easier to travel to access care/specialists. I think you should also try to match up to areas that are suitable for your personality. Different parts of the country have different culture, different personalities and a different vibe, some people like to poo poo me when I talk about this but it's a real thing and for me it affects my wellbeing and happiness. Maybe investigate local allergens if you are allergy prone, you don't want a big surprise, allergies vary by region.
 

SWAlexander

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Hi,
I would move somewhere that you have the most social supports already available to make a smoother transition and avoid isolation which can happen even to a healthy person moving to a new place. I would look for places with the least weather changes, if you google about best places to live with migraine that is a place to start, good migraine places tend to have less severe weather changes. Climate, are you ok with dry or moist, do you want water nearby or are you ok landlocked? I feel like the east coast gives one more options as far as healthcare, things are not so spread out making it easier to travel to access care/specialists. I think you should also try to match up to areas that are suitable for your personality. Different parts of the country have different culture, different personalities and a different vibe, some people like to poo poo me when I talk about this but it's a real thing and for me it affects my wellbeing and happiness. Maybe investigate local allergens if you are allergy prone, you don't want a big surprise, allergies vary by region.
No "poo poo" from me. I know exactly what you mean.
 

lenora

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HI.....Lots of things vary by region. Allergies are almost a fact of life everywhere today and sadly, we've done it to ourselves. Generally they kick in about 2 yrs. after you've moved.

There are some great answers to your question, but homesickness is probably going to be your biggest foe. It seems that no one is ever quite prepared for it.

Insofar as medical care is concerned, this can vary from state to state. Your company may offer a wonderful plan, or one that isn't so great.

People like Dr. Nancy Klimas (I haven't been to her) out of FL are excellent, and many places such as The Cleveland Clinic have excellent departments. It's very hard to get answers to all of our problems, but then you already probably noticed that where you are.

One of the first things you should do is find a neurologist or rheumatologist who will specialize in the care you need. A fairly modern facility is best b/c you'll have access to newer MRI's and other machines that may be needed. I tell people to keep all of the documents (copies) and they're easily available at a dept. next to where the MRI (for example) is given. Keep copies of all blood tests as medicine is literally changing by the day. You'll have a deductible each year with respect to your insurance.

I won't even mention Medicare b/c you don't look old enough for it. Medical care can be expensive, but it is quite thorough IF you get the right doctor. I'm not cured, don't expect to be, but my doctors do care and keep me as comfortable as possible. Dentistry and eye care are separate from medical insurance, so bear that in mind. Prescription costs can often be cheaper than insurance by the use of something called a Gold Card...ask your pharmacist about it. They're readily available.

You and you alone have to decide on where you want to live. North will definitely have a winter flavor, but in the south or places like TX (where I am) the hot weather can get wearisome from about mid-July on. If you're used to that....fine. The winters can be very mixed. There are a lot of places to choose from....rent don't buy to begin with. That way you can decide at your own leisure where you'd like to settle down. Good luck. Yours, Lenora.
 

Mouse girl

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Why not stay in France? Has the best health care in the world?

I would say, if you have money, depends on who you are in many ways. New York City has come good docs. Housing has gotten insane in America during covid. I wouldn't move anywhere unless you have to during covid. But I speak from experience since i moved during covid. I would wait till a more stable time.

If you are moving here due to a partner's work, now, that's another story. California is great. I live in So Cal. If you can afford it, it's wonderful. Central California is cool too as is Northern California. Oregon is much cheaper and loads of people like the slower pace.
 

Mouse girl

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There is one good doc in Los Angeles that i know of. He's a regular doctor so he won't try to sell you suppliments or make loads of money off you, that is very important as health care is a huge business in the states so there are endless doctors or alternative medicine people who see us as huge cash cows.
 

sometexan84

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Cali, 100%

Florida would be good for you. But Cali would too and for whatever reason has the CFS docs

Good weather and nice places in general, can have a positive impact on the condition.
 

Alvin2

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One of the things I would be looking forward to are increased health resources and doctors.
As others have mentioned this is the exact opposite of what you will find. Unless you have countless millions of dollars. And i do mean millions, there are many news articles of millionaires worrying about ending up with a chronic disease and dying destitute.
If you had to go to the emergency room you could end up paying 5 to 6 figures for routine care you would get for free in most other developed countries.

Assume you are going to have no more medical treatment the rest of your life and anything you can afford is a bonus if you move to the USA.
 

Booble

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Where would you live (U.S.) if you could choose? It’s a broad question, I suppose I’m asking from an ME/CFS, hEDS, dysautonomia, and overall healthcare standpoint. I may be moving (90% likely) to the U.S. next year. I am coming from a small town in France. One of the things I would be looking forward to are increased health resources and doctors. Looking forward to hearing from anyone.
Bonjour!

If you are in a small town in France and would like easier to access to healthcare I would consider a suburb of a major city. Someplace outside of Boston or New York City or Chicago or Philadelphia or Minneapolis. There are nice towns 20 miles or so away from the city that will have their own good hospitals and doctors and then you are also close enough to the big city as needed.